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Computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography in the diagnosis of Crohn's disease.

Kim SH - Intest Res (2015)

Bottom Line: Imaging of the small bowel is complicated by its length and its overlapping loops.Recently, however, the development of crosssectional imaging techniques, such as computed tomography enterography (CTE) and magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) has shifted fundamental paradigms in the diagnosis and management of patients with suspected or known Crohn's disease (CD).CTE and MRE are noninvasive imaging tests that involve the use of intraluminal oral and intravenous contrast agents to evaluate the small bowel.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Imaging of the small bowel is complicated by its length and its overlapping loops. Recently, however, the development of crosssectional imaging techniques, such as computed tomography enterography (CTE) and magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) has shifted fundamental paradigms in the diagnosis and management of patients with suspected or known Crohn's disease (CD). CTE and MRE are noninvasive imaging tests that involve the use of intraluminal oral and intravenous contrast agents to evaluate the small bowel. Here, we review recent advances in each cross-sectional imaging modality, their advantages and disadvantages, and their diagnostic performances in the evaluation of small bowel lesions in CD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Coronal CT enterography images using different types of neutral enteric contrast agents. CT enterography using polyethylene glycol (middle) and sorbitol (right) distends the small bowel effectively, while CT enterography using water (left) distends the small-bowel loops suboptimally.
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Figure 1: Coronal CT enterography images using different types of neutral enteric contrast agents. CT enterography using polyethylene glycol (middle) and sorbitol (right) distends the small bowel effectively, while CT enterography using water (left) distends the small-bowel loops suboptimally.

Mentions: Patients are asked to drink approximately 1.35-2 L of oral contrast medium over 45-60 minutes.9,15 During the oral phase, the encouragement and supervision of patients are highly recommended because patient compliance is essential to the success of CTE. Examples of neutral oral contrast agents with CT attenuation properties that are similar to those of water include a water-methylcellulose solution, polyethylene glycol, 3% sorbitol, a low-density (0.1%) barium solution (VoLumenĀ®, Bracco Imaging SpA, Milan, Italy), and milk (Fig. 1).10,16,17,18 Water on its own usually results in an inadequate distension due to its rapid reabsorption, although some authors advocate its use (Fig. 1).4


Computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography in the diagnosis of Crohn's disease.

Kim SH - Intest Res (2015)

Coronal CT enterography images using different types of neutral enteric contrast agents. CT enterography using polyethylene glycol (middle) and sorbitol (right) distends the small bowel effectively, while CT enterography using water (left) distends the small-bowel loops suboptimally.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4316219&req=5

Figure 1: Coronal CT enterography images using different types of neutral enteric contrast agents. CT enterography using polyethylene glycol (middle) and sorbitol (right) distends the small bowel effectively, while CT enterography using water (left) distends the small-bowel loops suboptimally.
Mentions: Patients are asked to drink approximately 1.35-2 L of oral contrast medium over 45-60 minutes.9,15 During the oral phase, the encouragement and supervision of patients are highly recommended because patient compliance is essential to the success of CTE. Examples of neutral oral contrast agents with CT attenuation properties that are similar to those of water include a water-methylcellulose solution, polyethylene glycol, 3% sorbitol, a low-density (0.1%) barium solution (VoLumenĀ®, Bracco Imaging SpA, Milan, Italy), and milk (Fig. 1).10,16,17,18 Water on its own usually results in an inadequate distension due to its rapid reabsorption, although some authors advocate its use (Fig. 1).4

Bottom Line: Imaging of the small bowel is complicated by its length and its overlapping loops.Recently, however, the development of crosssectional imaging techniques, such as computed tomography enterography (CTE) and magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) has shifted fundamental paradigms in the diagnosis and management of patients with suspected or known Crohn's disease (CD).CTE and MRE are noninvasive imaging tests that involve the use of intraluminal oral and intravenous contrast agents to evaluate the small bowel.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Imaging of the small bowel is complicated by its length and its overlapping loops. Recently, however, the development of crosssectional imaging techniques, such as computed tomography enterography (CTE) and magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) has shifted fundamental paradigms in the diagnosis and management of patients with suspected or known Crohn's disease (CD). CTE and MRE are noninvasive imaging tests that involve the use of intraluminal oral and intravenous contrast agents to evaluate the small bowel. Here, we review recent advances in each cross-sectional imaging modality, their advantages and disadvantages, and their diagnostic performances in the evaluation of small bowel lesions in CD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus