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Sonotubometry, a useful tool for the evaluation of the Eustachian tube ventilatory function.

Borangiu A, Popescu CR, Purcarea VL - J Med Life (2014 Oct-Dec)

Bottom Line: This requires equilibrium between the middle ear and ambient gas pressure, which makes the normal functioning of active ET opening of critical importance.The paper describes the test pattern used, and the computer-based platform based on: (1) Digital Signal Processing (DSP) for sound acquisition and low-level processing; (2) Artificial Intelligence techniques to extract significant sound features from sonotubograms and learn a manifold context database.Results are reported from test series carried out in healthy children; a similar study between tests is included in the final Discussions section.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: "Carol Davila" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, "M.S. Curie" Clinical Hospital.

ABSTRACT
From the three Eustachian tube (ET) functions: middle ear protection, secretion clearance and middle ear ventilation, the ventilatory function is unanimously considered the most important one, because proper hearing is established only when tympanic membrane compliance is normal. This requires equilibrium between the middle ear and ambient gas pressure, which makes the normal functioning of active ET opening of critical importance. There are several methods and tests that can assess such a complex and variable mechanism. Sonotubometry is one such method; despite the fact that it has been continuously improved in the last 20 years, it is not yet systematically used to evaluate the ET ventilatory function, because its measurement pattern, context mapping (patient, clinic data, medication, treatment), validation, reproducibility and value for clinic practice, have not yet been fully consolidated and integrated in a knowledge-based, service-oriented system, that can provide decision support or even diagnostic. The paper reviews the role of tubal sonometry as a non-invasive, physiologic and easy to use method in assessing the ventilatory function and investigates the validity and reproducibility of a measuring pattern and test in a group of children. The paper describes the test pattern used, and the computer-based platform based on: (1) Digital Signal Processing (DSP) for sound acquisition and low-level processing; (2) Artificial Intelligence techniques to extract significant sound features from sonotubograms and learn a manifold context database. Results are reported from test series carried out in healthy children; a similar study between tests is included in the final Discussions section.

No MeSH data available.


The sonotubometry method
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Figure 2: The sonotubometry method

Mentions: 3. Sonotubometry: this type of test conveys sound from the nose to the Eustachian tube and captures it from the external ear (Fig. 2). A constant sound source (e.g. sine, 7 KHz, 100 dB) is applied to the nostril, while a microphone placed in the external auditory canal records the transmitted and alternated sound pressure through the Eustachian tube and middle ear. The patient performs a specific manoeuvre (swallowing, yawning, Valsalva) and in the normal case of ET opening, a significant increase in sound level will be registered in the external ear canal. Thus, the ventilatory function of the tube can be non-invasively evaluated, and the measurements occur under physiological circumstances, without the need to use external pressures or to perforate the tympanic membrane [11].


Sonotubometry, a useful tool for the evaluation of the Eustachian tube ventilatory function.

Borangiu A, Popescu CR, Purcarea VL - J Med Life (2014 Oct-Dec)

The sonotubometry method
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4316148&req=5

Figure 2: The sonotubometry method
Mentions: 3. Sonotubometry: this type of test conveys sound from the nose to the Eustachian tube and captures it from the external ear (Fig. 2). A constant sound source (e.g. sine, 7 KHz, 100 dB) is applied to the nostril, while a microphone placed in the external auditory canal records the transmitted and alternated sound pressure through the Eustachian tube and middle ear. The patient performs a specific manoeuvre (swallowing, yawning, Valsalva) and in the normal case of ET opening, a significant increase in sound level will be registered in the external ear canal. Thus, the ventilatory function of the tube can be non-invasively evaluated, and the measurements occur under physiological circumstances, without the need to use external pressures or to perforate the tympanic membrane [11].

Bottom Line: This requires equilibrium between the middle ear and ambient gas pressure, which makes the normal functioning of active ET opening of critical importance.The paper describes the test pattern used, and the computer-based platform based on: (1) Digital Signal Processing (DSP) for sound acquisition and low-level processing; (2) Artificial Intelligence techniques to extract significant sound features from sonotubograms and learn a manifold context database.Results are reported from test series carried out in healthy children; a similar study between tests is included in the final Discussions section.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: "Carol Davila" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, "M.S. Curie" Clinical Hospital.

ABSTRACT
From the three Eustachian tube (ET) functions: middle ear protection, secretion clearance and middle ear ventilation, the ventilatory function is unanimously considered the most important one, because proper hearing is established only when tympanic membrane compliance is normal. This requires equilibrium between the middle ear and ambient gas pressure, which makes the normal functioning of active ET opening of critical importance. There are several methods and tests that can assess such a complex and variable mechanism. Sonotubometry is one such method; despite the fact that it has been continuously improved in the last 20 years, it is not yet systematically used to evaluate the ET ventilatory function, because its measurement pattern, context mapping (patient, clinic data, medication, treatment), validation, reproducibility and value for clinic practice, have not yet been fully consolidated and integrated in a knowledge-based, service-oriented system, that can provide decision support or even diagnostic. The paper reviews the role of tubal sonometry as a non-invasive, physiologic and easy to use method in assessing the ventilatory function and investigates the validity and reproducibility of a measuring pattern and test in a group of children. The paper describes the test pattern used, and the computer-based platform based on: (1) Digital Signal Processing (DSP) for sound acquisition and low-level processing; (2) Artificial Intelligence techniques to extract significant sound features from sonotubograms and learn a manifold context database. Results are reported from test series carried out in healthy children; a similar study between tests is included in the final Discussions section.

No MeSH data available.