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An imperceptible plastic electronic wrap.

Drack M, Graz I, Sekitani T, Someya T, Kaltenbrunner M, Bauer S - Adv. Mater. Weinheim (2014)

Bottom Line: Extremely compliant sub-2-μm sensor films enable temperature mapping on complex 3D objects, like integrated circuits on printed circuit boards, food packages, and on human skin.In their stretchable form, these metal films withstand strains up to 275%.This imperceptible electronic foil technology platform offers new avenues for the design of complex, hybrid rigid-island stretchable-interconnect electronic devices such as RGB light-emitting diode (LED) strips that can be stretched and twisted without impairing their function.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Soft Matter Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstrasse 69, 4040, Linz, Austria.

No MeSH data available.


Temperature monitoring on: a,b) printed circuit boards and c,d) on food items. a) TCR circuit mounted conformably on a PCB board (left) and IR camera recordings of the circuit in OFF (top right) and ON (bottom right) state. Scale bar: 5 mm. b) Comparison of temperature recording between the TCR sensor and the IR camera. c) Packaged frozen fish equipped with a TCR sensor (left) together with IR camera recordings in the frozen (top right) and thawed state (bottom right). Scale bar: 1 cm. d) Temperature profile during defrosting (right).
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fig02: Temperature monitoring on: a,b) printed circuit boards and c,d) on food items. a) TCR circuit mounted conformably on a PCB board (left) and IR camera recordings of the circuit in OFF (top right) and ON (bottom right) state. Scale bar: 5 mm. b) Comparison of temperature recording between the TCR sensor and the IR camera. c) Packaged frozen fish equipped with a TCR sensor (left) together with IR camera recordings in the frozen (top right) and thawed state (bottom right). Scale bar: 1 cm. d) Temperature profile during defrosting (right).

Mentions: We first demonstrate the use of imperceptible electronic films as sensitive and compliant temperature sensors on printed circuit boards (Figure2a), food items ( Figure 2b) and human skin (Figure S1, Supporting Information). 100-nm-thick films of gold, copper, aluminum, and silver are thermally evaporated onto flat 1.4-μm-thick PET foils. The extremely small bending radius allows the sensor foil to wrap tightly around the electronic components of the printed circuit board and to monitor the exponential rise and the saturation of the temperature during device operation ( Figure 2a). Placed on a package of frozen fish, the thin-film sensors measure the complete defrosting period of the fish (more than 15 h) with remarkable accuracy ( Figure 2b). A thin water film forms on the sensor foil during melting, which is reflected in a small increase of noise during the temperature recording. These harsh conditions, however, do not impair the reliability of the measurement. Precise spatio-temporal temperature mapping on the human skin is an important tool for diagnostics.[18] Attached to the nose, our sensors follow on-skin temperature changes induced by drinking a cup of hot tea and subsequently a glass of cold water (Figure S1, Supporting Information). Our approach does not require microstructuring techniques and is a low-cost solution for accurate temperature recording where ultrahigh spatial resolution is not needed. Details of the calibration and the temperature coefficients of the resistivity of the thin metal films used are given in Figure S2 in the Supporting Information. The thin-film-sensor temperature recordings on the integrated electronic circuit, on the food package, and on-skin show remarkable agreement with infrared camera recordings ( Figure 2a,b and Figure S1 in the Supporting Information) and fortify the sensor's potential as a low-cost solution for consumer electronics survey, food quality monitoring, and disposable patches in healthcare.


An imperceptible plastic electronic wrap.

Drack M, Graz I, Sekitani T, Someya T, Kaltenbrunner M, Bauer S - Adv. Mater. Weinheim (2014)

Temperature monitoring on: a,b) printed circuit boards and c,d) on food items. a) TCR circuit mounted conformably on a PCB board (left) and IR camera recordings of the circuit in OFF (top right) and ON (bottom right) state. Scale bar: 5 mm. b) Comparison of temperature recording between the TCR sensor and the IR camera. c) Packaged frozen fish equipped with a TCR sensor (left) together with IR camera recordings in the frozen (top right) and thawed state (bottom right). Scale bar: 1 cm. d) Temperature profile during defrosting (right).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4315904&req=5

fig02: Temperature monitoring on: a,b) printed circuit boards and c,d) on food items. a) TCR circuit mounted conformably on a PCB board (left) and IR camera recordings of the circuit in OFF (top right) and ON (bottom right) state. Scale bar: 5 mm. b) Comparison of temperature recording between the TCR sensor and the IR camera. c) Packaged frozen fish equipped with a TCR sensor (left) together with IR camera recordings in the frozen (top right) and thawed state (bottom right). Scale bar: 1 cm. d) Temperature profile during defrosting (right).
Mentions: We first demonstrate the use of imperceptible electronic films as sensitive and compliant temperature sensors on printed circuit boards (Figure2a), food items ( Figure 2b) and human skin (Figure S1, Supporting Information). 100-nm-thick films of gold, copper, aluminum, and silver are thermally evaporated onto flat 1.4-μm-thick PET foils. The extremely small bending radius allows the sensor foil to wrap tightly around the electronic components of the printed circuit board and to monitor the exponential rise and the saturation of the temperature during device operation ( Figure 2a). Placed on a package of frozen fish, the thin-film sensors measure the complete defrosting period of the fish (more than 15 h) with remarkable accuracy ( Figure 2b). A thin water film forms on the sensor foil during melting, which is reflected in a small increase of noise during the temperature recording. These harsh conditions, however, do not impair the reliability of the measurement. Precise spatio-temporal temperature mapping on the human skin is an important tool for diagnostics.[18] Attached to the nose, our sensors follow on-skin temperature changes induced by drinking a cup of hot tea and subsequently a glass of cold water (Figure S1, Supporting Information). Our approach does not require microstructuring techniques and is a low-cost solution for accurate temperature recording where ultrahigh spatial resolution is not needed. Details of the calibration and the temperature coefficients of the resistivity of the thin metal films used are given in Figure S2 in the Supporting Information. The thin-film-sensor temperature recordings on the integrated electronic circuit, on the food package, and on-skin show remarkable agreement with infrared camera recordings ( Figure 2a,b and Figure S1 in the Supporting Information) and fortify the sensor's potential as a low-cost solution for consumer electronics survey, food quality monitoring, and disposable patches in healthcare.

Bottom Line: Extremely compliant sub-2-μm sensor films enable temperature mapping on complex 3D objects, like integrated circuits on printed circuit boards, food packages, and on human skin.In their stretchable form, these metal films withstand strains up to 275%.This imperceptible electronic foil technology platform offers new avenues for the design of complex, hybrid rigid-island stretchable-interconnect electronic devices such as RGB light-emitting diode (LED) strips that can be stretched and twisted without impairing their function.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Soft Matter Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstrasse 69, 4040, Linz, Austria.

No MeSH data available.