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Linear regression analysis of Hospital Episode Statistics predicts a large increase in demand for elective hand surgery in England.

Bebbington E, Furniss D - J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg (2014)

Bottom Line: We analysed Hospital Episode Statistics data for Dupuytren's disease, carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, and trigger finger from 1998 to 2011.Combined with future population data, we calculate that the total operative burden for these four conditions will increase from 87,582 in 2011 to 170,166 (95% confidence interval 144,517-195,353) in 2030.The prevalence of these diseases in the ageing population, and increasing prevalence of predisposing factors such as obesity and diabetes, may account for the predicted increase in workload.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The School of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, The John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK.

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Absolute numbers of diagnoses for four common hand conditions, 2000–2011. Solid lines represent the means, and dotted lines the 95% confidence intervals of linear regression analysis performed on the data. For carpal tunnel r2 = 0.90; Dupuytren's disease r2 = 0.96; trigger finger r2 = 0.93; cubital tunnel r2 = 0.94.
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fig6: Absolute numbers of diagnoses for four common hand conditions, 2000–2011. Solid lines represent the means, and dotted lines the 95% confidence intervals of linear regression analysis performed on the data. For carpal tunnel r2 = 0.90; Dupuytren's disease r2 = 0.96; trigger finger r2 = 0.93; cubital tunnel r2 = 0.94.

Mentions: In parallel with the data reported for Dupuytren's disease, the number of diagnoses for all hand diseases analysed have increased between 1998 and 2011 (Figure 6). The fastest rate of increase is in carpal tunnel disease (slope mean 1768, 95% CI 1392–2144). Furthermore, the number of diagnoses as a percentage of the population has also increased for all four conditions.


Linear regression analysis of Hospital Episode Statistics predicts a large increase in demand for elective hand surgery in England.

Bebbington E, Furniss D - J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg (2014)

Absolute numbers of diagnoses for four common hand conditions, 2000–2011. Solid lines represent the means, and dotted lines the 95% confidence intervals of linear regression analysis performed on the data. For carpal tunnel r2 = 0.90; Dupuytren's disease r2 = 0.96; trigger finger r2 = 0.93; cubital tunnel r2 = 0.94.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4315884&req=5

fig6: Absolute numbers of diagnoses for four common hand conditions, 2000–2011. Solid lines represent the means, and dotted lines the 95% confidence intervals of linear regression analysis performed on the data. For carpal tunnel r2 = 0.90; Dupuytren's disease r2 = 0.96; trigger finger r2 = 0.93; cubital tunnel r2 = 0.94.
Mentions: In parallel with the data reported for Dupuytren's disease, the number of diagnoses for all hand diseases analysed have increased between 1998 and 2011 (Figure 6). The fastest rate of increase is in carpal tunnel disease (slope mean 1768, 95% CI 1392–2144). Furthermore, the number of diagnoses as a percentage of the population has also increased for all four conditions.

Bottom Line: We analysed Hospital Episode Statistics data for Dupuytren's disease, carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, and trigger finger from 1998 to 2011.Combined with future population data, we calculate that the total operative burden for these four conditions will increase from 87,582 in 2011 to 170,166 (95% confidence interval 144,517-195,353) in 2030.The prevalence of these diseases in the ageing population, and increasing prevalence of predisposing factors such as obesity and diabetes, may account for the predicted increase in workload.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The School of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, The John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus