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Mercury in precipitation over the coastal zone of the southern Baltic Sea, Poland.

Siudek P, Falkowska L, Brodecka A, Kowalski A, Frankowski M, Siepak J - Environ Sci Pollut Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: Elevated concentrations of Hg in wintertime precipitation were generally the result of local urban atmospheric emission connected with the following anthropogenic sources: intensive combustion of fossil fuels in domestic furnaces, individual power/heat generating plants, and motor vehicles.The results presented in this work indicate that rainwater Hg concentration and deposition values are not much higher in comparison with other urban locations along the Baltic Sea basin and other coastal cities.However, the elevated mercury concentration in rainwater and, consequently, higher deposition ratio could appear occasionally as an effect of intensive anthropogenic emissions (domestic heating) and/or photochemical reactions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Marine Chemistry and Environmental Protection, Institute of Oceanography, Gdansk University, Marszalka Pilsudskiego 46, 81-378, Gdynia, Poland, pat.s@amu.edu.pl.

ABSTRACT
An investigation of atmospheric mercury was conducted in the urban coastal zone of the Gulf of Gdansk (Baltic Sea, Poland) in 2008. Rainwater samples were collected in bulk samplers and Hg concentration was determined using AAS method. Total mercury concentration ranged from 1.9 to 14.8 ng l(-1) (the mean was 8.3 ng l(-1) with standard deviation ±3.7), out of which about 34 % were water-soluble Hg(II) forms. Distribution of Hg species in rainwater was related to both the emission source and the atmospheric processes. During the sampling period, two maxima of Hg concentration in precipitation were observed: the first in the cold season and the second one in the warm season. Elevated concentrations of Hg in wintertime precipitation were generally the result of local urban atmospheric emission connected with the following anthropogenic sources: intensive combustion of fossil fuels in domestic furnaces, individual power/heat generating plants, and motor vehicles. During summertime, Hg° re-emitted from contaminated land and sea surfaces was photochemically oxidized by active atmospheric substances (e.g., hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen peroxide, halogens) and could be an additional source of atmospherically deposited Hg. The results presented in this work indicate that rainwater Hg concentration and deposition values are not much higher in comparison with other urban locations along the Baltic Sea basin and other coastal cities. However, the elevated mercury concentration in rainwater and, consequently, higher deposition ratio could appear occasionally as an effect of intensive anthropogenic emissions (domestic heating) and/or photochemical reactions.

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Sampling location for Hg measurements in Gdynia (Poland) between January and December 2008
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Fig1: Sampling location for Hg measurements in Gdynia (Poland) between January and December 2008

Mentions: Rainwater samples were collected in Gdynia during the entire year of field measurements. The sampling site (φ = 54°30′34″N, λ = 18°32′30″E) was representative for the surrounding urban Pomerania region, situated ∼100 m from the heavy-traffic road and about 1,000 m from the coastline, on the roof of the Oceanography Institute of Gdansk University (20 m above ground level and above the tree-tops) (Fig. 1).Fig. 1


Mercury in precipitation over the coastal zone of the southern Baltic Sea, Poland.

Siudek P, Falkowska L, Brodecka A, Kowalski A, Frankowski M, Siepak J - Environ Sci Pollut Res Int (2014)

Sampling location for Hg measurements in Gdynia (Poland) between January and December 2008
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4315877&req=5

Fig1: Sampling location for Hg measurements in Gdynia (Poland) between January and December 2008
Mentions: Rainwater samples were collected in Gdynia during the entire year of field measurements. The sampling site (φ = 54°30′34″N, λ = 18°32′30″E) was representative for the surrounding urban Pomerania region, situated ∼100 m from the heavy-traffic road and about 1,000 m from the coastline, on the roof of the Oceanography Institute of Gdansk University (20 m above ground level and above the tree-tops) (Fig. 1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Elevated concentrations of Hg in wintertime precipitation were generally the result of local urban atmospheric emission connected with the following anthropogenic sources: intensive combustion of fossil fuels in domestic furnaces, individual power/heat generating plants, and motor vehicles.The results presented in this work indicate that rainwater Hg concentration and deposition values are not much higher in comparison with other urban locations along the Baltic Sea basin and other coastal cities.However, the elevated mercury concentration in rainwater and, consequently, higher deposition ratio could appear occasionally as an effect of intensive anthropogenic emissions (domestic heating) and/or photochemical reactions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Marine Chemistry and Environmental Protection, Institute of Oceanography, Gdansk University, Marszalka Pilsudskiego 46, 81-378, Gdynia, Poland, pat.s@amu.edu.pl.

ABSTRACT
An investigation of atmospheric mercury was conducted in the urban coastal zone of the Gulf of Gdansk (Baltic Sea, Poland) in 2008. Rainwater samples were collected in bulk samplers and Hg concentration was determined using AAS method. Total mercury concentration ranged from 1.9 to 14.8 ng l(-1) (the mean was 8.3 ng l(-1) with standard deviation ±3.7), out of which about 34 % were water-soluble Hg(II) forms. Distribution of Hg species in rainwater was related to both the emission source and the atmospheric processes. During the sampling period, two maxima of Hg concentration in precipitation were observed: the first in the cold season and the second one in the warm season. Elevated concentrations of Hg in wintertime precipitation were generally the result of local urban atmospheric emission connected with the following anthropogenic sources: intensive combustion of fossil fuels in domestic furnaces, individual power/heat generating plants, and motor vehicles. During summertime, Hg° re-emitted from contaminated land and sea surfaces was photochemically oxidized by active atmospheric substances (e.g., hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen peroxide, halogens) and could be an additional source of atmospherically deposited Hg. The results presented in this work indicate that rainwater Hg concentration and deposition values are not much higher in comparison with other urban locations along the Baltic Sea basin and other coastal cities. However, the elevated mercury concentration in rainwater and, consequently, higher deposition ratio could appear occasionally as an effect of intensive anthropogenic emissions (domestic heating) and/or photochemical reactions.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus