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A case of advanced malignant pleural mesothelioma treatment with chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy.

Ryu JW, Kim YS - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2015)

Bottom Line: Our patient received chemotherapy using pemetrexed/cisplatin.Afterwards, he received a single PDT treatment and then later took chemotherapy using gemcitabine/cisplatin.The patient showed a survival time of 27 months, which is longer than median survival time in advanced MPM patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive, treatment-resistant, and generally fatal disease. A 68-year-old male who was diagnosed with MPM at another hospital came to our hospital with dyspnea. We advised him to take combination chemotherapy but he refused to take the treatment. That was because he had already received chemotherapy with supportive care at another hospital but his condition worsened. Thus, we recommended photodynamic therapy (PDT) to deal with the dyspnea and MPM. After PDT, the dyspnea improved and the patient then decided to take the combination chemotherapy. Our patient received chemotherapy using pemetrexed/cisplatin. Afterwards, he received a single PDT treatment and then later took chemotherapy using gemcitabine/cisplatin. The patient showed a survival time of 27 months, which is longer than median survival time in advanced MPM patients. Further research and clinical trials are needed to demonstrate any synergistic effect between the combination chemotherapy and PDT.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The initial chest radiograph at our hospital shows a huge mass with multiple pleural nodules and pleural effusion in the right hemithorax.
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Figure 1: The initial chest radiograph at our hospital shows a huge mass with multiple pleural nodules and pleural effusion in the right hemithorax.

Mentions: A 68-year-old male came to our hospital because of dyspnea. He had symptoms like dyspnea and weight loss for 4 months before he came to our hospital. He was admitted to another university hospital and diagnosed with MPM through thoracoscopic biopsy. So, pathological examination was not performed on the patient in our hospital. In the other hospital, chemotherapy had been already performed on him but the symptoms did not improve. To control dyspnea, pleurodesis was carried out following two times of chest tube insertion. Instead, increased effusion on the right sided pleura aggravated dyspnea. Eventually he had to come to our hospital with aggravated dyspnea. He had taken medications for 3 years to treat hypertension. His smoking history was 30 pack years. His job had nothing to do with asbestos. At the time of admission in our hospital, his initial vital signs are as follows: blood pressure, 150/80 mm Hg; respiratory rate, 28 breaths per minute; pulse rate, 86 beats per minute; and body temperature, 36.5℃. Chest auscultation revealed decrease in breathing sound over the entire right lung. The chest radiography taken at the time of admission showed about 11-cm mass with multiple pleural nodules and pleural effusion in the right hemithorax (Figure 1). Chest computed tomography (CT) scans revealed about 11.5×16-cm mass with pleural effusion and disseminated pleura metastasis in the right hemithorax. Direct invasion to paratracheal lymph node, right paraaortic nodal station, and pleura in the back of the right lower lobe was observed (Figure 2A, B). Bone scan revealed bone metastasis on the ninth right rib and the fourth lumbar spine.


A case of advanced malignant pleural mesothelioma treatment with chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy.

Ryu JW, Kim YS - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2015)

The initial chest radiograph at our hospital shows a huge mass with multiple pleural nodules and pleural effusion in the right hemithorax.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4311034&req=5

Figure 1: The initial chest radiograph at our hospital shows a huge mass with multiple pleural nodules and pleural effusion in the right hemithorax.
Mentions: A 68-year-old male came to our hospital because of dyspnea. He had symptoms like dyspnea and weight loss for 4 months before he came to our hospital. He was admitted to another university hospital and diagnosed with MPM through thoracoscopic biopsy. So, pathological examination was not performed on the patient in our hospital. In the other hospital, chemotherapy had been already performed on him but the symptoms did not improve. To control dyspnea, pleurodesis was carried out following two times of chest tube insertion. Instead, increased effusion on the right sided pleura aggravated dyspnea. Eventually he had to come to our hospital with aggravated dyspnea. He had taken medications for 3 years to treat hypertension. His smoking history was 30 pack years. His job had nothing to do with asbestos. At the time of admission in our hospital, his initial vital signs are as follows: blood pressure, 150/80 mm Hg; respiratory rate, 28 breaths per minute; pulse rate, 86 beats per minute; and body temperature, 36.5℃. Chest auscultation revealed decrease in breathing sound over the entire right lung. The chest radiography taken at the time of admission showed about 11-cm mass with multiple pleural nodules and pleural effusion in the right hemithorax (Figure 1). Chest computed tomography (CT) scans revealed about 11.5×16-cm mass with pleural effusion and disseminated pleura metastasis in the right hemithorax. Direct invasion to paratracheal lymph node, right paraaortic nodal station, and pleura in the back of the right lower lobe was observed (Figure 2A, B). Bone scan revealed bone metastasis on the ninth right rib and the fourth lumbar spine.

Bottom Line: Our patient received chemotherapy using pemetrexed/cisplatin.Afterwards, he received a single PDT treatment and then later took chemotherapy using gemcitabine/cisplatin.The patient showed a survival time of 27 months, which is longer than median survival time in advanced MPM patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive, treatment-resistant, and generally fatal disease. A 68-year-old male who was diagnosed with MPM at another hospital came to our hospital with dyspnea. We advised him to take combination chemotherapy but he refused to take the treatment. That was because he had already received chemotherapy with supportive care at another hospital but his condition worsened. Thus, we recommended photodynamic therapy (PDT) to deal with the dyspnea and MPM. After PDT, the dyspnea improved and the patient then decided to take the combination chemotherapy. Our patient received chemotherapy using pemetrexed/cisplatin. Afterwards, he received a single PDT treatment and then later took chemotherapy using gemcitabine/cisplatin. The patient showed a survival time of 27 months, which is longer than median survival time in advanced MPM patients. Further research and clinical trials are needed to demonstrate any synergistic effect between the combination chemotherapy and PDT.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus