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Association between objectively measured sleep quality and obesity in community-dwelling adults aged 80 years or older: a cross-sectional study.

Kim M - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: Participants wore an accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X+) on their non-dominant wrist 24 hr per day for 7 consecutive nights.Sleep parameters measured included total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and wake after sleep onset (WASO) during the night.We found that poor sleep quality was an independent risk factor for obesity in community-dwelling Japanese adults aged ≥ 80 yr, even after controlling for potential confounding factors, including daily physical activity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Team for Promoting Independence of the Elderly, Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital and Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to examine the association between objective measures of sleep quality and obesity in older community-dwelling people. This cross-sectional study included 189 community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 80 yr (83.4 ± 2.5 yr [age range, 80-95 yr]). Participants wore an accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X+) on their non-dominant wrist 24 hr per day for 7 consecutive nights. Sleep parameters measured included total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and wake after sleep onset (WASO) during the night. Associations between sleep parameters and obesity were investigated by using multivariate logistic regression analysis. In multivariate models, those with sleep efficiency lower than 85% had a 2.85-fold increased odds of obesity, compared with those with sleep efficiency of 85% or higher. Similarly, those with WASO of ≥ 60 min (compared with < 60 min) had a 3.13-fold increased odds of obesity. However, there were no significant associations between total sleep time or self-reported napping duration and obesity. We found that poor sleep quality was an independent risk factor for obesity in community-dwelling Japanese adults aged ≥ 80 yr, even after controlling for potential confounding factors, including daily physical activity.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The association between the body mass index and (A) sleep efficiency and (B) wake time after sleep onset in men and women.
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Figure 1: The association between the body mass index and (A) sleep efficiency and (B) wake time after sleep onset in men and women.

Mentions: Table 2 shows a comparison of sleep parameters and physical activity between the 2 groups. Accelerometer data were collected for an average of 6.4±0.6 nights. With regard to total sleep time, 25.9% of the subjects had <6 hr a night, and 10.1% had >8 hr a night. There was no significant difference in total sleep time between the 2 groups. Subjects with obesity had higher average total counts in bedtime than the subjects with normal weight. Those with obesity had longer WASO and lower sleep efficiency than those with normal weight. In addition, sleep quality, such as lower sleep efficiency (<85%) and more nocturnal awakenings (WASO ≥60 min), were significant difference between the 2 groups. Average nap duration for those who napped was 52.5±29.9 min. There was no significant difference in average nap duration between the 2 groups. The overall physical activity was 1,744.2±489.2 counts per minute per day. The correlations between BMI and sleep quality are shown in Fig. 1. Sleep efficiency showed a significant negative correlation with BMI. In contrast, WASO had a significant positive correlation with BMI. In addition, total counts in bedtime and daily physical activity correlated slightly with BMI (r=0.127, P=0.083, and r=-0.129, P=0.077, respectively). However, there was no association between total sleep time and BMI (data not shown).


Association between objectively measured sleep quality and obesity in community-dwelling adults aged 80 years or older: a cross-sectional study.

Kim M - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2015)

The association between the body mass index and (A) sleep efficiency and (B) wake time after sleep onset in men and women.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4310948&req=5

Figure 1: The association between the body mass index and (A) sleep efficiency and (B) wake time after sleep onset in men and women.
Mentions: Table 2 shows a comparison of sleep parameters and physical activity between the 2 groups. Accelerometer data were collected for an average of 6.4±0.6 nights. With regard to total sleep time, 25.9% of the subjects had <6 hr a night, and 10.1% had >8 hr a night. There was no significant difference in total sleep time between the 2 groups. Subjects with obesity had higher average total counts in bedtime than the subjects with normal weight. Those with obesity had longer WASO and lower sleep efficiency than those with normal weight. In addition, sleep quality, such as lower sleep efficiency (<85%) and more nocturnal awakenings (WASO ≥60 min), were significant difference between the 2 groups. Average nap duration for those who napped was 52.5±29.9 min. There was no significant difference in average nap duration between the 2 groups. The overall physical activity was 1,744.2±489.2 counts per minute per day. The correlations between BMI and sleep quality are shown in Fig. 1. Sleep efficiency showed a significant negative correlation with BMI. In contrast, WASO had a significant positive correlation with BMI. In addition, total counts in bedtime and daily physical activity correlated slightly with BMI (r=0.127, P=0.083, and r=-0.129, P=0.077, respectively). However, there was no association between total sleep time and BMI (data not shown).

Bottom Line: Participants wore an accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X+) on their non-dominant wrist 24 hr per day for 7 consecutive nights.Sleep parameters measured included total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and wake after sleep onset (WASO) during the night.We found that poor sleep quality was an independent risk factor for obesity in community-dwelling Japanese adults aged ≥ 80 yr, even after controlling for potential confounding factors, including daily physical activity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Team for Promoting Independence of the Elderly, Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital and Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to examine the association between objective measures of sleep quality and obesity in older community-dwelling people. This cross-sectional study included 189 community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 80 yr (83.4 ± 2.5 yr [age range, 80-95 yr]). Participants wore an accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X+) on their non-dominant wrist 24 hr per day for 7 consecutive nights. Sleep parameters measured included total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and wake after sleep onset (WASO) during the night. Associations between sleep parameters and obesity were investigated by using multivariate logistic regression analysis. In multivariate models, those with sleep efficiency lower than 85% had a 2.85-fold increased odds of obesity, compared with those with sleep efficiency of 85% or higher. Similarly, those with WASO of ≥ 60 min (compared with < 60 min) had a 3.13-fold increased odds of obesity. However, there were no significant associations between total sleep time or self-reported napping duration and obesity. We found that poor sleep quality was an independent risk factor for obesity in community-dwelling Japanese adults aged ≥ 80 yr, even after controlling for potential confounding factors, including daily physical activity.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus