Limits...
Individual and socioeconomic contextual effects on depressive symptom in Korea: multilevel analysis of cross-sectional nationwide survey.

Lee EW, Park JH - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: The results of this study showed that people in the highest level of community income had a higher risk of depressive symptom compared with people in the lowest (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.4-1.9).Moreover a significant interaction was found between household income and community mean income (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.97-0.99).This study identified that the level of community income has an inverse association, and its effect is especially stronger among low income individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.

ABSTRACT
This study was aimed to examine the relationship between individual, socioeconomic context and depressive symptom among Korean population. Data were the Korean Community Health Survey (KCHS), a nationwide survey collected from 253 local communities including 230,715 adults aged 19 yr or over. To identify depressive symptom, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D) was used. This study employed multilevel logistic regression to analyze the hierarchical data that included individual and community level variables. The results of this study showed that people in the highest level of community income had a higher risk of depressive symptom compared with people in the lowest (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.4-1.9). In a chi-square test for trend, the prevalence of depressive symptom was significantly increased with increased level of community income among all groups of the family income (P<0.001). Moreover a significant interaction was found between household income and community mean income (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.97-0.99). Among individual level variables, age, sex, education, income, living alone, and the number of illnesses were associated with depressive symptom. This study identified that the level of community income has an inverse association, and its effect is especially stronger among low income individuals.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

The prevalence of depressive symptom and interaction between household income and community income.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4310946&req=5

Figure 1: The prevalence of depressive symptom and interaction between household income and community income.

Mentions: Fig. 1 provides the prevalence of depressive symptom for individuals grouped by family income level according to the community mean income level of their residence. As a result of chi-square test for trend, the pattern with regard to community income level was consistent. The prevalence increased consistently with increased community income level in all groups of the family income (P<0.001), but the magnitude of the difference in prevalence between those with the lowest income and those with highest income was quite different. The gap of the prevalence within the lowest family income group was around 7% (from 17.9% to 24.9%) whereas the gap within highest family income group was around 1% (from 5.7% to 6.9%). It showed that those with lower income are more sensitive to community income level than those with higher family income.


Individual and socioeconomic contextual effects on depressive symptom in Korea: multilevel analysis of cross-sectional nationwide survey.

Lee EW, Park JH - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2015)

The prevalence of depressive symptom and interaction between household income and community income.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4310946&req=5

Figure 1: The prevalence of depressive symptom and interaction between household income and community income.
Mentions: Fig. 1 provides the prevalence of depressive symptom for individuals grouped by family income level according to the community mean income level of their residence. As a result of chi-square test for trend, the pattern with regard to community income level was consistent. The prevalence increased consistently with increased community income level in all groups of the family income (P<0.001), but the magnitude of the difference in prevalence between those with the lowest income and those with highest income was quite different. The gap of the prevalence within the lowest family income group was around 7% (from 17.9% to 24.9%) whereas the gap within highest family income group was around 1% (from 5.7% to 6.9%). It showed that those with lower income are more sensitive to community income level than those with higher family income.

Bottom Line: The results of this study showed that people in the highest level of community income had a higher risk of depressive symptom compared with people in the lowest (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.4-1.9).Moreover a significant interaction was found between household income and community mean income (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.97-0.99).This study identified that the level of community income has an inverse association, and its effect is especially stronger among low income individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.

ABSTRACT
This study was aimed to examine the relationship between individual, socioeconomic context and depressive symptom among Korean population. Data were the Korean Community Health Survey (KCHS), a nationwide survey collected from 253 local communities including 230,715 adults aged 19 yr or over. To identify depressive symptom, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D) was used. This study employed multilevel logistic regression to analyze the hierarchical data that included individual and community level variables. The results of this study showed that people in the highest level of community income had a higher risk of depressive symptom compared with people in the lowest (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.4-1.9). In a chi-square test for trend, the prevalence of depressive symptom was significantly increased with increased level of community income among all groups of the family income (P<0.001). Moreover a significant interaction was found between household income and community mean income (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.97-0.99). Among individual level variables, age, sex, education, income, living alone, and the number of illnesses were associated with depressive symptom. This study identified that the level of community income has an inverse association, and its effect is especially stronger among low income individuals.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus