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Diagnostic performance of body mass index using the Western Pacific Regional Office of World Health Organization reference standards for body fat percentage.

Yoon JL, Cho JJ, Park KM, Noh HM, Park YS - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: Associations between body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage (BF%), and health risks differ between Asian and European populations.The optimal BMI cut-off (24.2 kg/m(2)) had 78% sensitivity and 71% specificity.BMI demonstrated limited diagnostic accuracy for adiposity in Korea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Associations between body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage (BF%), and health risks differ between Asian and European populations. BMI is commonly used to diagnose obesity; however, its accuracy in detecting adiposity in Koreans is unknown. The present cross-sectional study aimed at assessing the accuracy of BMI in determining BF%-defined obesity in 6,017 subjects (age 20-69 yr, 43.6% men) from the 2009 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We assessed the diagnostic performance of BMI using the Western Pacific Regional Office of World Health Organization reference standard for BF%-defined obesity by sex and age and identified the optimal BMI cut-off for BF%-defined obesity using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. BMI-defined obesity (≥25 kg/m(2)) was observed in 38.7% of men and 28.1% of women, with a high specificity (89%, men; 84%, women) but poor sensitivity (56%, men; 72% women) for BF%-defined obesity (25.2%, men; 31.1%, women). The optimal BMI cut-off (24.2 kg/m(2)) had 78% sensitivity and 71% specificity. BMI demonstrated limited diagnostic accuracy for adiposity in Korea. There was a -1.3 kg/m(2) difference in optimal BMI cut-offs between Korea and America, smaller than the 5-unit difference between the Western Pacific Regional Office and global World Health Organization obesity criteria.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for body mass index (BMI) to detect body fat percentage (BF%)-defined obesity for all subjects and by sex. AUC, area under the curve; BMI, body mass index.
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Figure 1: Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for body mass index (BMI) to detect body fat percentage (BF%)-defined obesity for all subjects and by sex. AUC, area under the curve; BMI, body mass index.

Mentions: Fig. 1 shows the ROC curves for detecting BF%-defined obesity using BMI as well as the diagnostic performance for the optimal BMI cut-off in all subjects and by sex. Overall, the area under the curve was 0.82 for BMI to detect excess BF%, and the optimal cut-off was 24.2 kg/m2, which resulted in 78% sensitivity and 71% specificity; after stratifying by sex, the optimal cut-offs for men and women were 24.6 kg/m2 (80% sensitivity and 67% specificity) and 24.1 kg/m2 (74% sensitivity and 79% specificity), respectively.


Diagnostic performance of body mass index using the Western Pacific Regional Office of World Health Organization reference standards for body fat percentage.

Yoon JL, Cho JJ, Park KM, Noh HM, Park YS - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2015)

Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for body mass index (BMI) to detect body fat percentage (BF%)-defined obesity for all subjects and by sex. AUC, area under the curve; BMI, body mass index.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4310942&req=5

Figure 1: Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for body mass index (BMI) to detect body fat percentage (BF%)-defined obesity for all subjects and by sex. AUC, area under the curve; BMI, body mass index.
Mentions: Fig. 1 shows the ROC curves for detecting BF%-defined obesity using BMI as well as the diagnostic performance for the optimal BMI cut-off in all subjects and by sex. Overall, the area under the curve was 0.82 for BMI to detect excess BF%, and the optimal cut-off was 24.2 kg/m2, which resulted in 78% sensitivity and 71% specificity; after stratifying by sex, the optimal cut-offs for men and women were 24.6 kg/m2 (80% sensitivity and 67% specificity) and 24.1 kg/m2 (74% sensitivity and 79% specificity), respectively.

Bottom Line: Associations between body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage (BF%), and health risks differ between Asian and European populations.The optimal BMI cut-off (24.2 kg/m(2)) had 78% sensitivity and 71% specificity.BMI demonstrated limited diagnostic accuracy for adiposity in Korea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Associations between body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage (BF%), and health risks differ between Asian and European populations. BMI is commonly used to diagnose obesity; however, its accuracy in detecting adiposity in Koreans is unknown. The present cross-sectional study aimed at assessing the accuracy of BMI in determining BF%-defined obesity in 6,017 subjects (age 20-69 yr, 43.6% men) from the 2009 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We assessed the diagnostic performance of BMI using the Western Pacific Regional Office of World Health Organization reference standard for BF%-defined obesity by sex and age and identified the optimal BMI cut-off for BF%-defined obesity using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. BMI-defined obesity (≥25 kg/m(2)) was observed in 38.7% of men and 28.1% of women, with a high specificity (89%, men; 84%, women) but poor sensitivity (56%, men; 72% women) for BF%-defined obesity (25.2%, men; 31.1%, women). The optimal BMI cut-off (24.2 kg/m(2)) had 78% sensitivity and 71% specificity. BMI demonstrated limited diagnostic accuracy for adiposity in Korea. There was a -1.3 kg/m(2) difference in optimal BMI cut-offs between Korea and America, smaller than the 5-unit difference between the Western Pacific Regional Office and global World Health Organization obesity criteria.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus