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Pain and depression: a neurobiological perspective of their relationship.

Han C, Pae CU - Psychiatry Investig (2015)

Bottom Line: The principal role of neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones has been proposed in the development of pain and depression.With the progression of molecular biology, an intricate interaction among biological factors accountable to the development and management of pain and depression has been also shown in a numerous preclinical and clinical researches.This mini-review will briefly describe the current issues and future research direction for better understanding of the relationship between pain and depression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Remarkable progresses have been achieved regarding the understanding of the neurobiological bases of pain and depression. The principal role of neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones has been proposed in the development of pain and depression. With the progression of molecular biology, an intricate interaction among biological factors accountable to the development and management of pain and depression has been also shown in a numerous preclinical and clinical researches. This mini-review will briefly describe the current issues and future research direction for better understanding of the relationship between pain and depression.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The physiological pathway of pain. FC: frontal cortex, PSC: primary sensory cortex, HT: hypothalamus,CC: cingulated cortex, AMD: amygdala, MTN: medial thalamic nuclei, LTN: lateral thalamic nuclei, FNE: free nerve ending. The whole process of perception of pain is following: Transduction → Transmission (central sensitization) → Modulation → Perception.
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Figure 1: The physiological pathway of pain. FC: frontal cortex, PSC: primary sensory cortex, HT: hypothalamus,CC: cingulated cortex, AMD: amygdala, MTN: medial thalamic nuclei, LTN: lateral thalamic nuclei, FNE: free nerve ending. The whole process of perception of pain is following: Transduction → Transmission (central sensitization) → Modulation → Perception.

Mentions: The principal biochemical basis for pain and depression has focused on the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine. Both the serotonin and norepinephrine pathways in the brain and their associated symptoms have been determined. As described before, both pathways originate in the brain stem nuclei and project to multiple brain regions such as somatosensory cortex, intralaminar nuclei and ventral posterior nuclei of the thalamis.35 In the context of pain regulation, peripheral pathways descend projections from the brain stem to the spinal cord. The serotonin and norepinephrine descending neurons project from the brain stem into the spinal cord's dorsal horn, where a set of biochemical cascades takes place involving other types of neurotransmitters for controlling pain.35 The Figure 1 represents schematic illustration of the pain pathway.


Pain and depression: a neurobiological perspective of their relationship.

Han C, Pae CU - Psychiatry Investig (2015)

The physiological pathway of pain. FC: frontal cortex, PSC: primary sensory cortex, HT: hypothalamus,CC: cingulated cortex, AMD: amygdala, MTN: medial thalamic nuclei, LTN: lateral thalamic nuclei, FNE: free nerve ending. The whole process of perception of pain is following: Transduction → Transmission (central sensitization) → Modulation → Perception.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4310906&req=5

Figure 1: The physiological pathway of pain. FC: frontal cortex, PSC: primary sensory cortex, HT: hypothalamus,CC: cingulated cortex, AMD: amygdala, MTN: medial thalamic nuclei, LTN: lateral thalamic nuclei, FNE: free nerve ending. The whole process of perception of pain is following: Transduction → Transmission (central sensitization) → Modulation → Perception.
Mentions: The principal biochemical basis for pain and depression has focused on the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine. Both the serotonin and norepinephrine pathways in the brain and their associated symptoms have been determined. As described before, both pathways originate in the brain stem nuclei and project to multiple brain regions such as somatosensory cortex, intralaminar nuclei and ventral posterior nuclei of the thalamis.35 In the context of pain regulation, peripheral pathways descend projections from the brain stem to the spinal cord. The serotonin and norepinephrine descending neurons project from the brain stem into the spinal cord's dorsal horn, where a set of biochemical cascades takes place involving other types of neurotransmitters for controlling pain.35 The Figure 1 represents schematic illustration of the pain pathway.

Bottom Line: The principal role of neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones has been proposed in the development of pain and depression.With the progression of molecular biology, an intricate interaction among biological factors accountable to the development and management of pain and depression has been also shown in a numerous preclinical and clinical researches.This mini-review will briefly describe the current issues and future research direction for better understanding of the relationship between pain and depression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Remarkable progresses have been achieved regarding the understanding of the neurobiological bases of pain and depression. The principal role of neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones has been proposed in the development of pain and depression. With the progression of molecular biology, an intricate interaction among biological factors accountable to the development and management of pain and depression has been also shown in a numerous preclinical and clinical researches. This mini-review will briefly describe the current issues and future research direction for better understanding of the relationship between pain and depression.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus