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The human gut microbiota with reference to autism spectrum disorder: considering the whole as more than a sum of its parts.

Toh MC, Allen-Vercoe E - Microb. Ecol. Health Dis. (2015)

Bottom Line: The human gut microbiota is a complex microbial ecosystem that contributes an important component towards the health of its host.This highly complex ecosystem has been underestimated in its importance until recently, when a realization of the enormous scope of gut microbiota function has been (and continues to be) revealed.One of the more striking of these discoveries is the finding that the gut microbiota and the brain are connected, and thus there is potential for the microbiota in the gut to influence behavior and mental health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada.

ABSTRACT
The human gut microbiota is a complex microbial ecosystem that contributes an important component towards the health of its host. This highly complex ecosystem has been underestimated in its importance until recently, when a realization of the enormous scope of gut microbiota function has been (and continues to be) revealed. One of the more striking of these discoveries is the finding that the gut microbiota and the brain are connected, and thus there is potential for the microbiota in the gut to influence behavior and mental health. In this short review, we outline the link between brain and gut microbiota and urge the reader to consider the gut microbiota as an ecosystem 'organ' rather than just as a collection of microbes filling a niche, using the hypothesized role of the gut microbiota in autism spectrum disorder to illustrate the concept.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Trends in human microbiome research over the last decade: PubMed Citations by year using search term ‘Human microbiome’. Y-axis: number of publications.
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Figure 0001: Trends in human microbiome research over the last decade: PubMed Citations by year using search term ‘Human microbiome’. Y-axis: number of publications.

Mentions: In recent years, research into the human microbiome has captured the imagination of the general public, much in the same way that human genome research permeated public consciousness at the start of the new millennium. As a field of study, human microbiome research has exploded in the last decade (Fig. 1), which has led to a new awareness of the importance of these associated microbes to our overall health. This came as somewhat of a shock to those of us who were raised to think of all microbes as ‘germs’ to be eradicated; instead, we are beginning to see ourselves as microbe managers, tending to the needs of our microbial ‘employees’ for mutual benefit. This short review discusses how human-associated microbes – particularly those in the gut – affect health, and how the widespread phenomenon of gut microbial ‘dysbiosis’ could be driving an epidemic of chronic disease, which may include autism spectrum disorder (ASD).


The human gut microbiota with reference to autism spectrum disorder: considering the whole as more than a sum of its parts.

Toh MC, Allen-Vercoe E - Microb. Ecol. Health Dis. (2015)

Trends in human microbiome research over the last decade: PubMed Citations by year using search term ‘Human microbiome’. Y-axis: number of publications.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4310852&req=5

Figure 0001: Trends in human microbiome research over the last decade: PubMed Citations by year using search term ‘Human microbiome’. Y-axis: number of publications.
Mentions: In recent years, research into the human microbiome has captured the imagination of the general public, much in the same way that human genome research permeated public consciousness at the start of the new millennium. As a field of study, human microbiome research has exploded in the last decade (Fig. 1), which has led to a new awareness of the importance of these associated microbes to our overall health. This came as somewhat of a shock to those of us who were raised to think of all microbes as ‘germs’ to be eradicated; instead, we are beginning to see ourselves as microbe managers, tending to the needs of our microbial ‘employees’ for mutual benefit. This short review discusses how human-associated microbes – particularly those in the gut – affect health, and how the widespread phenomenon of gut microbial ‘dysbiosis’ could be driving an epidemic of chronic disease, which may include autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Bottom Line: The human gut microbiota is a complex microbial ecosystem that contributes an important component towards the health of its host.This highly complex ecosystem has been underestimated in its importance until recently, when a realization of the enormous scope of gut microbiota function has been (and continues to be) revealed.One of the more striking of these discoveries is the finding that the gut microbiota and the brain are connected, and thus there is potential for the microbiota in the gut to influence behavior and mental health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada.

ABSTRACT
The human gut microbiota is a complex microbial ecosystem that contributes an important component towards the health of its host. This highly complex ecosystem has been underestimated in its importance until recently, when a realization of the enormous scope of gut microbiota function has been (and continues to be) revealed. One of the more striking of these discoveries is the finding that the gut microbiota and the brain are connected, and thus there is potential for the microbiota in the gut to influence behavior and mental health. In this short review, we outline the link between brain and gut microbiota and urge the reader to consider the gut microbiota as an ecosystem 'organ' rather than just as a collection of microbes filling a niche, using the hypothesized role of the gut microbiota in autism spectrum disorder to illustrate the concept.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus