Limits...
Cardiac autonomic modulation in healthy elderly after different intensities of dynamic exercise.

Droguett VS, Santos Ada C, de Medeiros CE, Marques DP, do Nascimento LS, Brasileiro-Santos Mdo S - Clin Interv Aging (2015)

Bottom Line: A relevant increase in HR response was observed at 15 minutes postexercise with intensities of 60% and 40% of the maximum HR (10±2 bpm versus 5±1 bpm, respectively; P=0.005), and a significant reduction in HRV was also noted with 40% and 60% intensities during the rest period, and significant reduction in HRV (RR variance) was also observed in 40% and 60% intensities when compared to the baseline, as well as between the post-exercise intensities (1032±32 ms versus 905±5 ms) (P<0.001).A significant reduction of high frequency component at 40% and 60% intensities, however, was observed when compared to baseline (31±2 nu and 23±1 nu versus 45±1 nu, respectively; P<0.001).There was an increase in the HR, sympathetic modulation, and sympathovagal balance, as well as a reduction in vagal modulation in the elderly at both intensities of the PEX.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To investigate the heart rate (HR) and its autonomic modulation at baseline and during dynamic postexercise (P(EX)) with intensities of 40% and 60% of the maximum HR in healthy elderly.

Methods: This cross-sectional study included ten apparently healthy people who had been submitted to a protocol on a cycle ergometer for 35 minutes. Autonomic modulation was evaluated by spectral analysis of HR variability (HRV).

Results: A relevant increase in HR response was observed at 15 minutes postexercise with intensities of 60% and 40% of the maximum HR (10±2 bpm versus 5±1 bpm, respectively; P=0.005), and a significant reduction in HRV was also noted with 40% and 60% intensities during the rest period, and significant reduction in HRV (RR variance) was also observed in 40% and 60% intensities when compared to the baseline, as well as between the post-exercise intensities (1032±32 ms versus 905±5 ms) (P<0.001). In the HRV spectral analysis, a significant increase in the low frequency component HRV and autonomic balance at 40% of the maximum HR (68±2 normalized units [nu] versus 55±1 nu and 2.0±0.1 versus 1.2±0.1; P<0.001) and at 60% of the maximum HR (77±1 nu versus 55±1 nu and 3.2±0.1 versus 1.2±0.1 [P<0.001]) in relation to baseline was observed. A significant reduction of high frequency component at 40% and 60% intensities, however, was observed when compared to baseline (31±2 nu and 23±1 nu versus 45±1 nu, respectively; P<0.001). Moreover, significant differences were observed for the low frequency and high frequency components, as well as for the sympathovagal balance between participants who reached 40% and 60% of the maximum HR.

Conclusion: There was an increase in the HR, sympathetic modulation, and sympathovagal balance, as well as a reduction in vagal modulation in the elderly at both intensities of the PEX.

Show MeSH
HR responses at mild (PEX40%) and moderate (PEX60%) dynamic exercise in elderly subjects (n=10).Notes: *P<0.001 PEX40% versus PEX60%. Values are presented as the mean ± standard error.Abbreviations: HR, heart rate; PEX, postexercise; n, number.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4310707&req=5

f1-cia-10-203: HR responses at mild (PEX40%) and moderate (PEX60%) dynamic exercise in elderly subjects (n=10).Notes: *P<0.001 PEX40% versus PEX60%. Values are presented as the mean ± standard error.Abbreviations: HR, heart rate; PEX, postexercise; n, number.

Mentions: HR responses were significantly lower after mild-intensity exercise (dynamic postexercise [PEX]40%: 5±1 bpm) when compared with moderate-intensity exercise (PEX60%: 10±2 bpm) in elderly subjects (Figure 1). The R-R interval was significantly decreased in elderly subjects after mild and moderate intensive exercises (1,032±23 ms and 905±8 ms, respectively), as opposed to the baseline conditions (1,240±32 ms). Similar to the ratio between the different intensities, the R-R at PEX60% was significantly lower than that at PEX40% (905±8 ms versus 1,032±23 ms) (Figure 2A). R-R interval variance was significantly reduced at both intensities of the exercise (PEX40%: 1,535±73 ms; PEX60%: 1,213±35 ms) when compared to baseline conditions (3,154±110 ms) (Figure 2B). Elderly subjects had a considerably increased normalized LF variability in the R-R interval after mild- (PEX40%: 68±2 nu) and moderate- (PEX60%: 77±1 nu) intensity exercises when compared with baseline conditions (55±1 nu; P<0.001, all comparisons). When both components of LF (low frequency) (nu) with 40% and 60% of the maximum HR were compared, a significant statistical difference (68±1 nu and 77±1 nu; P<0.001) was observed (Figure 2C). The normalized HF variability of the R-R interval was significantly decreased after mild (PEX40%: 23±1 nu) and moderate (PEX60%: 31±2 nu) intensities of dynamic exercises when compared to baseline conditions (45±1 nu). In terms of the different intensities of the dynamic exercises, we observed that high frequency in PEX60% was significantly lower than PEX40% (31±2 high nu versus 23±1 nu) (Figure 2D). Consequently, the LF-to-HF ratio of R-R variability was increased in mild (PEX40%: 2.0±0.1) and moderate (PEX60%: 3.2±0.1) dynamic exercise intensities when compared to baseline conditions (1.2±0.1) in elderly subjects. In addition, when mild and moderate exercise intensities were compared, we observed that the sympathovagal balance was significantly lower in PEX40% compared to PEX60% (2.0±0.1 versus 3.2±0.1) (Figure 2E) (P<0.001, for all comparisons).


Cardiac autonomic modulation in healthy elderly after different intensities of dynamic exercise.

Droguett VS, Santos Ada C, de Medeiros CE, Marques DP, do Nascimento LS, Brasileiro-Santos Mdo S - Clin Interv Aging (2015)

HR responses at mild (PEX40%) and moderate (PEX60%) dynamic exercise in elderly subjects (n=10).Notes: *P<0.001 PEX40% versus PEX60%. Values are presented as the mean ± standard error.Abbreviations: HR, heart rate; PEX, postexercise; n, number.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4310707&req=5

f1-cia-10-203: HR responses at mild (PEX40%) and moderate (PEX60%) dynamic exercise in elderly subjects (n=10).Notes: *P<0.001 PEX40% versus PEX60%. Values are presented as the mean ± standard error.Abbreviations: HR, heart rate; PEX, postexercise; n, number.
Mentions: HR responses were significantly lower after mild-intensity exercise (dynamic postexercise [PEX]40%: 5±1 bpm) when compared with moderate-intensity exercise (PEX60%: 10±2 bpm) in elderly subjects (Figure 1). The R-R interval was significantly decreased in elderly subjects after mild and moderate intensive exercises (1,032±23 ms and 905±8 ms, respectively), as opposed to the baseline conditions (1,240±32 ms). Similar to the ratio between the different intensities, the R-R at PEX60% was significantly lower than that at PEX40% (905±8 ms versus 1,032±23 ms) (Figure 2A). R-R interval variance was significantly reduced at both intensities of the exercise (PEX40%: 1,535±73 ms; PEX60%: 1,213±35 ms) when compared to baseline conditions (3,154±110 ms) (Figure 2B). Elderly subjects had a considerably increased normalized LF variability in the R-R interval after mild- (PEX40%: 68±2 nu) and moderate- (PEX60%: 77±1 nu) intensity exercises when compared with baseline conditions (55±1 nu; P<0.001, all comparisons). When both components of LF (low frequency) (nu) with 40% and 60% of the maximum HR were compared, a significant statistical difference (68±1 nu and 77±1 nu; P<0.001) was observed (Figure 2C). The normalized HF variability of the R-R interval was significantly decreased after mild (PEX40%: 23±1 nu) and moderate (PEX60%: 31±2 nu) intensities of dynamic exercises when compared to baseline conditions (45±1 nu). In terms of the different intensities of the dynamic exercises, we observed that high frequency in PEX60% was significantly lower than PEX40% (31±2 high nu versus 23±1 nu) (Figure 2D). Consequently, the LF-to-HF ratio of R-R variability was increased in mild (PEX40%: 2.0±0.1) and moderate (PEX60%: 3.2±0.1) dynamic exercise intensities when compared to baseline conditions (1.2±0.1) in elderly subjects. In addition, when mild and moderate exercise intensities were compared, we observed that the sympathovagal balance was significantly lower in PEX40% compared to PEX60% (2.0±0.1 versus 3.2±0.1) (Figure 2E) (P<0.001, for all comparisons).

Bottom Line: A relevant increase in HR response was observed at 15 minutes postexercise with intensities of 60% and 40% of the maximum HR (10±2 bpm versus 5±1 bpm, respectively; P=0.005), and a significant reduction in HRV was also noted with 40% and 60% intensities during the rest period, and significant reduction in HRV (RR variance) was also observed in 40% and 60% intensities when compared to the baseline, as well as between the post-exercise intensities (1032±32 ms versus 905±5 ms) (P<0.001).A significant reduction of high frequency component at 40% and 60% intensities, however, was observed when compared to baseline (31±2 nu and 23±1 nu versus 45±1 nu, respectively; P<0.001).There was an increase in the HR, sympathetic modulation, and sympathovagal balance, as well as a reduction in vagal modulation in the elderly at both intensities of the PEX.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To investigate the heart rate (HR) and its autonomic modulation at baseline and during dynamic postexercise (P(EX)) with intensities of 40% and 60% of the maximum HR in healthy elderly.

Methods: This cross-sectional study included ten apparently healthy people who had been submitted to a protocol on a cycle ergometer for 35 minutes. Autonomic modulation was evaluated by spectral analysis of HR variability (HRV).

Results: A relevant increase in HR response was observed at 15 minutes postexercise with intensities of 60% and 40% of the maximum HR (10±2 bpm versus 5±1 bpm, respectively; P=0.005), and a significant reduction in HRV was also noted with 40% and 60% intensities during the rest period, and significant reduction in HRV (RR variance) was also observed in 40% and 60% intensities when compared to the baseline, as well as between the post-exercise intensities (1032±32 ms versus 905±5 ms) (P<0.001). In the HRV spectral analysis, a significant increase in the low frequency component HRV and autonomic balance at 40% of the maximum HR (68±2 normalized units [nu] versus 55±1 nu and 2.0±0.1 versus 1.2±0.1; P<0.001) and at 60% of the maximum HR (77±1 nu versus 55±1 nu and 3.2±0.1 versus 1.2±0.1 [P<0.001]) in relation to baseline was observed. A significant reduction of high frequency component at 40% and 60% intensities, however, was observed when compared to baseline (31±2 nu and 23±1 nu versus 45±1 nu, respectively; P<0.001). Moreover, significant differences were observed for the low frequency and high frequency components, as well as for the sympathovagal balance between participants who reached 40% and 60% of the maximum HR.

Conclusion: There was an increase in the HR, sympathetic modulation, and sympathovagal balance, as well as a reduction in vagal modulation in the elderly at both intensities of the PEX.

Show MeSH