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Transdiagnostic Case Conceptualization of Emotional Problems in Youth with ASD: An Emotion Regulation Approach.

Weiss JA - Clin Psychol (New York) (2014)

Bottom Line: A number of authors have designed cognitive-behavioral interventions to address transdiagnostic factors related to multiple emotional problems, although none have applied this focus to youth with ASD.The current review article describes how a transdiagnostic emotion regulation framework may inform cognitive-behavioral interventions for youth with ASD, which until now have focused almost exclusively on anxiety.Research is needed to empirically test how a transdiagnostic intervention can address the processes of emotion regulation and assist youth with ASD to cope with their emotional disorders.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: York University.

ABSTRACT

Youth with autism spectrum disorder often struggle to cope with co-occurring anxiety, depression, or anger, and having both internalizing and externalizing symptoms is a common clinical presentation. A number of authors have designed cognitive-behavioral interventions to address transdiagnostic factors related to multiple emotional problems, although none have applied this focus to youth with ASD. The current review article describes how a transdiagnostic emotion regulation framework may inform cognitive-behavioral interventions for youth with ASD, which until now have focused almost exclusively on anxiety. Research is needed to empirically test how a transdiagnostic intervention can address the processes of emotion regulation and assist youth with ASD to cope with their emotional disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Transdiagnostic emotion regulation model. The five processes of Gross and Thompson's (2007) modal model of emotion regulation, with each one leading to the next, and response modulation affecting one's situation selection or other ER domains (Level 2). Successful emotion regulation, at any one domain, is considered an individual–relational interaction with parents/caregivers, peers, and other authority figures (e.g., teachers; Level 1). Each process may be “adaptive” or “maladaptive,” depending on any given strategy's short- and long-term outcomes.
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fig01: Transdiagnostic emotion regulation model. The five processes of Gross and Thompson's (2007) modal model of emotion regulation, with each one leading to the next, and response modulation affecting one's situation selection or other ER domains (Level 2). Successful emotion regulation, at any one domain, is considered an individual–relational interaction with parents/caregivers, peers, and other authority figures (e.g., teachers; Level 1). Each process may be “adaptive” or “maladaptive,” depending on any given strategy's short- and long-term outcomes.

Mentions: Gross and Thompson (2007) describe five temporally linked domains of a person–situation interaction where emotions can be regulated: situation selection, situation modification, attentional deployment, cognitive change, and response modulation. By employing a transdiagnostic case conceptualization that examines each component, clinicians can foster a child's internal skills to help him or her regulate emotions when confronted with challenges. For instance, these five components serve as the framework of Ehrenreich-May's UP-Y program, informing intervention design to address emotion regulation problems in youth without ASD. Understanding how youth with ASD demonstrate maladaptive and adaptive emotion regulation processes can greatly assist treatment planning. Figure1 presents common adaptive and maladaptive aspects of each component, and how it can be examined with an ASD lens (described below).


Transdiagnostic Case Conceptualization of Emotional Problems in Youth with ASD: An Emotion Regulation Approach.

Weiss JA - Clin Psychol (New York) (2014)

Transdiagnostic emotion regulation model. The five processes of Gross and Thompson's (2007) modal model of emotion regulation, with each one leading to the next, and response modulation affecting one's situation selection or other ER domains (Level 2). Successful emotion regulation, at any one domain, is considered an individual–relational interaction with parents/caregivers, peers, and other authority figures (e.g., teachers; Level 1). Each process may be “adaptive” or “maladaptive,” depending on any given strategy's short- and long-term outcomes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4310071&req=5

fig01: Transdiagnostic emotion regulation model. The five processes of Gross and Thompson's (2007) modal model of emotion regulation, with each one leading to the next, and response modulation affecting one's situation selection or other ER domains (Level 2). Successful emotion regulation, at any one domain, is considered an individual–relational interaction with parents/caregivers, peers, and other authority figures (e.g., teachers; Level 1). Each process may be “adaptive” or “maladaptive,” depending on any given strategy's short- and long-term outcomes.
Mentions: Gross and Thompson (2007) describe five temporally linked domains of a person–situation interaction where emotions can be regulated: situation selection, situation modification, attentional deployment, cognitive change, and response modulation. By employing a transdiagnostic case conceptualization that examines each component, clinicians can foster a child's internal skills to help him or her regulate emotions when confronted with challenges. For instance, these five components serve as the framework of Ehrenreich-May's UP-Y program, informing intervention design to address emotion regulation problems in youth without ASD. Understanding how youth with ASD demonstrate maladaptive and adaptive emotion regulation processes can greatly assist treatment planning. Figure1 presents common adaptive and maladaptive aspects of each component, and how it can be examined with an ASD lens (described below).

Bottom Line: A number of authors have designed cognitive-behavioral interventions to address transdiagnostic factors related to multiple emotional problems, although none have applied this focus to youth with ASD.The current review article describes how a transdiagnostic emotion regulation framework may inform cognitive-behavioral interventions for youth with ASD, which until now have focused almost exclusively on anxiety.Research is needed to empirically test how a transdiagnostic intervention can address the processes of emotion regulation and assist youth with ASD to cope with their emotional disorders.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: York University.

ABSTRACT

Youth with autism spectrum disorder often struggle to cope with co-occurring anxiety, depression, or anger, and having both internalizing and externalizing symptoms is a common clinical presentation. A number of authors have designed cognitive-behavioral interventions to address transdiagnostic factors related to multiple emotional problems, although none have applied this focus to youth with ASD. The current review article describes how a transdiagnostic emotion regulation framework may inform cognitive-behavioral interventions for youth with ASD, which until now have focused almost exclusively on anxiety. Research is needed to empirically test how a transdiagnostic intervention can address the processes of emotion regulation and assist youth with ASD to cope with their emotional disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus