Limits...
An injectable acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon.

Deng ZD, Carlson TJ, Li H, Xiao J, Myjak MJ, Lu J, Martinez JJ, Woodley CM, Weiland MA, Eppard MB - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Salmon recovery and the potential detrimental effects of dams on fish have been attracting national attention due to the environmental and economic implications.Because the new transmitter costs significantly less to use and may substantially reduce adverse effects of implantation and tag burden, it will allow for study of migration behavior and survival of species and sizes of fish that have never been studied before.The new technology will lead to critical information needed for salmon recovery and the development of fish-friendly hydroelectric systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352.

ABSTRACT
Salmon recovery and the potential detrimental effects of dams on fish have been attracting national attention due to the environmental and economic implications. In recent years acoustic telemetry has been the primary method for studying salmon passage. However, the size of the existing transmitters limits the minimum size of fish that can be studied, introducing a bias to the study results. We developed the first acoustic fish transmitter that can be implanted by injection instead of surgery. The new injectable transmitter lasts four times longer and weighs 30% less than other transmitters. Because the new transmitter costs significantly less to use and may substantially reduce adverse effects of implantation and tag burden, it will allow for study of migration behavior and survival of species and sizes of fish that have never been studied before. The new technology will lead to critical information needed for salmon recovery and the development of fish-friendly hydroelectric systems.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Photographs of the injectable transmitter and the PNNL-developed micro-battery used by the injectable transmitter: (a) the injectable transmitter; (b) the micro-battery standing next to a commercial 337 button-cell battery which is used by the existing commercial JSATS transmitters.(photos by H.L.)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4309970&req=5

f3: Photographs of the injectable transmitter and the PNNL-developed micro-battery used by the injectable transmitter: (a) the injectable transmitter; (b) the micro-battery standing next to a commercial 337 button-cell battery which is used by the existing commercial JSATS transmitters.(photos by H.L.)

Mentions: Figure 2 is a schematic of the transmitter, showing from three different angles the three main components encapsulated by epoxy in a primarily cylindrical body. For weight reduction as well as acoustic beam pattern optimization purposes, the front portion containing the PZT and circuit board has a smaller cross section than the rear portion. The transmitter is 15.0 mm long and has a diameter of 3.38 mm, which allows it to be injected using an 8-gauge needle. The dry weight of the transmitter is 217 milligrams, about 30% lighter than the smallest commercially available acoustic fish transmitter16, offering significant tag burden reduction to the tagged fish. Tag burden is defined as the ratio of the dry weight of the transmitter relative to the dry weight of the fish in which it is implanted. A photograph of the prototype injectable transmitter is shown in Figure 3a.


An injectable acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon.

Deng ZD, Carlson TJ, Li H, Xiao J, Myjak MJ, Lu J, Martinez JJ, Woodley CM, Weiland MA, Eppard MB - Sci Rep (2015)

Photographs of the injectable transmitter and the PNNL-developed micro-battery used by the injectable transmitter: (a) the injectable transmitter; (b) the micro-battery standing next to a commercial 337 button-cell battery which is used by the existing commercial JSATS transmitters.(photos by H.L.)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4309970&req=5

f3: Photographs of the injectable transmitter and the PNNL-developed micro-battery used by the injectable transmitter: (a) the injectable transmitter; (b) the micro-battery standing next to a commercial 337 button-cell battery which is used by the existing commercial JSATS transmitters.(photos by H.L.)
Mentions: Figure 2 is a schematic of the transmitter, showing from three different angles the three main components encapsulated by epoxy in a primarily cylindrical body. For weight reduction as well as acoustic beam pattern optimization purposes, the front portion containing the PZT and circuit board has a smaller cross section than the rear portion. The transmitter is 15.0 mm long and has a diameter of 3.38 mm, which allows it to be injected using an 8-gauge needle. The dry weight of the transmitter is 217 milligrams, about 30% lighter than the smallest commercially available acoustic fish transmitter16, offering significant tag burden reduction to the tagged fish. Tag burden is defined as the ratio of the dry weight of the transmitter relative to the dry weight of the fish in which it is implanted. A photograph of the prototype injectable transmitter is shown in Figure 3a.

Bottom Line: Salmon recovery and the potential detrimental effects of dams on fish have been attracting national attention due to the environmental and economic implications.Because the new transmitter costs significantly less to use and may substantially reduce adverse effects of implantation and tag burden, it will allow for study of migration behavior and survival of species and sizes of fish that have never been studied before.The new technology will lead to critical information needed for salmon recovery and the development of fish-friendly hydroelectric systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352.

ABSTRACT
Salmon recovery and the potential detrimental effects of dams on fish have been attracting national attention due to the environmental and economic implications. In recent years acoustic telemetry has been the primary method for studying salmon passage. However, the size of the existing transmitters limits the minimum size of fish that can be studied, introducing a bias to the study results. We developed the first acoustic fish transmitter that can be implanted by injection instead of surgery. The new injectable transmitter lasts four times longer and weighs 30% less than other transmitters. Because the new transmitter costs significantly less to use and may substantially reduce adverse effects of implantation and tag burden, it will allow for study of migration behavior and survival of species and sizes of fish that have never been studied before. The new technology will lead to critical information needed for salmon recovery and the development of fish-friendly hydroelectric systems.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus