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Fully printed flexible and disposable wireless cyclic voltammetry tag.

Jung Y, Park H, Park JA, Noh J, Choi Y, Jung M, Jung K, Pyo M, Chen K, Javey A, Cho G - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: By simply dropping any specimen solution on the electrochemical cell in the CV tag, the presence of solutes in the solution can be detected and shown on the signage of the CV tag in five sec. 10 mM of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) was used as a standard solute to prove the working concept of fully printed disposable wireless CV tag.Within five seconds, we can wirelessly diagnose the presence of TMPD in the solution using the CV tag in the proximity of the 13.56 MHz RF reader.This fully printed and wirelessly operated flexible CV tag is the first of its kind and marks the path for the utilization of inexpensive and disposable wireless electrochemical sensor systems for initial diagnose hazardous chemicals and biological molecules to improve public hygiene and health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Printed Electronics Engineering, Sunchon National University, Maegok, Sunchon, Jeonnam 540-742 Korea.

ABSTRACT
A disposable cyclic voltammetry (CV) tag is printed on a plastic film by integrating wireless power transmitter, polarized triangle wave generator, electrochemical cell and signage through a scalable gravure printing method. By proximity of 13.56 MHz RF reader, the printed CV tag generates 320 mHz of triangular sweep wave from +500 mV to -500 mV which enable to scan a printed electrochemical cell in the CV tag. By simply dropping any specimen solution on the electrochemical cell in the CV tag, the presence of solutes in the solution can be detected and shown on the signage of the CV tag in five sec. 10 mM of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) was used as a standard solute to prove the working concept of fully printed disposable wireless CV tag. Within five seconds, we can wirelessly diagnose the presence of TMPD in the solution using the CV tag in the proximity of the 13.56 MHz RF reader. This fully printed and wirelessly operated flexible CV tag is the first of its kind and marks the path for the utilization of inexpensive and disposable wireless electrochemical sensor systems for initial diagnose hazardous chemicals and biological molecules to improve public hygiene and health.

No MeSH data available.


(a) Optical image of fully printed wireless cyclic voltammetry tag. (b) Operation images of CV tag with and (c) without TMPD in the solution on 13.56 MHz reader. (d) Converted cyclic voltammogram from the printed wireless CV tag vs (e) a commercial CV instrument (please refer the interconnected video file for the demonstration of wireless CV tag operation in Figure S12 in Supplementary Information).
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f4: (a) Optical image of fully printed wireless cyclic voltammetry tag. (b) Operation images of CV tag with and (c) without TMPD in the solution on 13.56 MHz reader. (d) Converted cyclic voltammogram from the printed wireless CV tag vs (e) a commercial CV instrument (please refer the interconnected video file for the demonstration of wireless CV tag operation in Figure S12 in Supplementary Information).

Mentions: The fully printed flexible CV tag was completed by assembling the printed circuits including ring oscillator, buffer, electrochemical cell, amplifier, and signage onto the previously R2R gravure printed rectenna. The resultant CV tag is shown in Figure 4a. The working concept of the wireless and flexible CV tag is demonstrated in the following sequences (watch the video file by clicking Figure S12 in Supplementary Information). After dropping 500 μl of TMPD solution (10 mM) on the printed electrochemical cell, the CV tag was placed on the custom made RF (13.56 MHz) reader (Figure S13 in Supplementary Information). The antenna was subsequently coupled to 13.56 MHz AC. The coupled AC was rectified into polarized DC (> ± 10 V) through two diodes and two capacitors which caused the ring oscillator to generate a pseudo triangular waveform with output voltage of 7 V at 320 mHz. This was then passed through the buffer unit to scan the electrochemical cell. The output signal after scanning the electrochemical cell was amplified to turn on the signage according to the concentration level of TMPD in the solution. In this work, whenever the concentration of TMPD was higher than 10 mM, the signage “PE” blinked (Figure 4b) while it did not show anything (Figure 4c) when it was lower than 10 mM. Furthermore, clear cyclic voltammograms for scanning the electrochemical cell with and without 10 mM of TMPD were obtained by re-plotting the output triangular voltage waveform (Figure 4d). The attained half potential (E1/2 ~ 0.05 V, oxidation potential is 0.22 V and reduction potential is −0.17 V) of TMPD from the CV tag was nearly identical to the value obtained from a commercial CV instrument, SP-240, Biologic, which uses the same frequency for the triangular voltage waveform and printed electrochemical cell (Figure 4e). However, when the generated triangle wave frequency is higher than 0.6 Hz in the CV tag, the clear redox peaks cannot be observed as shown in Figure S14 (Supplementary Information). Furthermore, as a typical example of testing a specimen in aqueous solution, 10 mM of K3(FeCN)6 aqueous solution was checked using the CV tag, and results of converted cyclic voltammogram was shown in Figure S15 (Supplementary Information). Those results support that the CV tag can examine specimens not only in organic solution, but also in aqueous one.


Fully printed flexible and disposable wireless cyclic voltammetry tag.

Jung Y, Park H, Park JA, Noh J, Choi Y, Jung M, Jung K, Pyo M, Chen K, Javey A, Cho G - Sci Rep (2015)

(a) Optical image of fully printed wireless cyclic voltammetry tag. (b) Operation images of CV tag with and (c) without TMPD in the solution on 13.56 MHz reader. (d) Converted cyclic voltammogram from the printed wireless CV tag vs (e) a commercial CV instrument (please refer the interconnected video file for the demonstration of wireless CV tag operation in Figure S12 in Supplementary Information).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4309959&req=5

f4: (a) Optical image of fully printed wireless cyclic voltammetry tag. (b) Operation images of CV tag with and (c) without TMPD in the solution on 13.56 MHz reader. (d) Converted cyclic voltammogram from the printed wireless CV tag vs (e) a commercial CV instrument (please refer the interconnected video file for the demonstration of wireless CV tag operation in Figure S12 in Supplementary Information).
Mentions: The fully printed flexible CV tag was completed by assembling the printed circuits including ring oscillator, buffer, electrochemical cell, amplifier, and signage onto the previously R2R gravure printed rectenna. The resultant CV tag is shown in Figure 4a. The working concept of the wireless and flexible CV tag is demonstrated in the following sequences (watch the video file by clicking Figure S12 in Supplementary Information). After dropping 500 μl of TMPD solution (10 mM) on the printed electrochemical cell, the CV tag was placed on the custom made RF (13.56 MHz) reader (Figure S13 in Supplementary Information). The antenna was subsequently coupled to 13.56 MHz AC. The coupled AC was rectified into polarized DC (> ± 10 V) through two diodes and two capacitors which caused the ring oscillator to generate a pseudo triangular waveform with output voltage of 7 V at 320 mHz. This was then passed through the buffer unit to scan the electrochemical cell. The output signal after scanning the electrochemical cell was amplified to turn on the signage according to the concentration level of TMPD in the solution. In this work, whenever the concentration of TMPD was higher than 10 mM, the signage “PE” blinked (Figure 4b) while it did not show anything (Figure 4c) when it was lower than 10 mM. Furthermore, clear cyclic voltammograms for scanning the electrochemical cell with and without 10 mM of TMPD were obtained by re-plotting the output triangular voltage waveform (Figure 4d). The attained half potential (E1/2 ~ 0.05 V, oxidation potential is 0.22 V and reduction potential is −0.17 V) of TMPD from the CV tag was nearly identical to the value obtained from a commercial CV instrument, SP-240, Biologic, which uses the same frequency for the triangular voltage waveform and printed electrochemical cell (Figure 4e). However, when the generated triangle wave frequency is higher than 0.6 Hz in the CV tag, the clear redox peaks cannot be observed as shown in Figure S14 (Supplementary Information). Furthermore, as a typical example of testing a specimen in aqueous solution, 10 mM of K3(FeCN)6 aqueous solution was checked using the CV tag, and results of converted cyclic voltammogram was shown in Figure S15 (Supplementary Information). Those results support that the CV tag can examine specimens not only in organic solution, but also in aqueous one.

Bottom Line: By simply dropping any specimen solution on the electrochemical cell in the CV tag, the presence of solutes in the solution can be detected and shown on the signage of the CV tag in five sec. 10 mM of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) was used as a standard solute to prove the working concept of fully printed disposable wireless CV tag.Within five seconds, we can wirelessly diagnose the presence of TMPD in the solution using the CV tag in the proximity of the 13.56 MHz RF reader.This fully printed and wirelessly operated flexible CV tag is the first of its kind and marks the path for the utilization of inexpensive and disposable wireless electrochemical sensor systems for initial diagnose hazardous chemicals and biological molecules to improve public hygiene and health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Printed Electronics Engineering, Sunchon National University, Maegok, Sunchon, Jeonnam 540-742 Korea.

ABSTRACT
A disposable cyclic voltammetry (CV) tag is printed on a plastic film by integrating wireless power transmitter, polarized triangle wave generator, electrochemical cell and signage through a scalable gravure printing method. By proximity of 13.56 MHz RF reader, the printed CV tag generates 320 mHz of triangular sweep wave from +500 mV to -500 mV which enable to scan a printed electrochemical cell in the CV tag. By simply dropping any specimen solution on the electrochemical cell in the CV tag, the presence of solutes in the solution can be detected and shown on the signage of the CV tag in five sec. 10 mM of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) was used as a standard solute to prove the working concept of fully printed disposable wireless CV tag. Within five seconds, we can wirelessly diagnose the presence of TMPD in the solution using the CV tag in the proximity of the 13.56 MHz RF reader. This fully printed and wirelessly operated flexible CV tag is the first of its kind and marks the path for the utilization of inexpensive and disposable wireless electrochemical sensor systems for initial diagnose hazardous chemicals and biological molecules to improve public hygiene and health.

No MeSH data available.