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The effects of acute waterborne exposure to sublethal concentrations of molybdenum on the stress response in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

Ricketts CD, Bates WR, Reid SD - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Heat shock protein 72 was not induced as a result of exposure and there were no detectable changes in total hsp70 (72 and 73), hsp90, and MT levels in any of the tissues relative to controls.These experiments demonstrate that exposure to waterborne Mo of up to 1,000 mg l(-1) did not activate a physiological or cellular stress response in fish.Information from this study suggests that Mo water quality guidelines for the protection of aquatic life are highly protective of freshwater fish, namely rainbow trout.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, University of British Columbia, Okanagan campus, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada, V1V 1V7.

ABSTRACT
To determine if molybdenum (Mo) is a chemical stressor, fingerling and juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to waterborne sodium molybdate (0, 2, 20, or 1,000 mg l-1 of Mo) and components of the physiological (plasma cortisol, blood glucose, and hematocrit) and cellular (heat shock protein [hsp] 72, hsp73, and hsp90 in the liver, gills, heart, and erythrocytes and metallothionein [MT] in the liver and gills) stress responses were measured prior to initiation of exposure and at 8, 24, and 96 h. During the acute exposure, plasma cortisol, blood glucose, and hematocrit levels remained unchanged in all treatments. Heat shock protein 72 was not induced as a result of exposure and there were no detectable changes in total hsp70 (72 and 73), hsp90, and MT levels in any of the tissues relative to controls. Both fingerling and juvenile fish responded with similar lack of apparent sensitivity to Mo exposure. These experiments demonstrate that exposure to waterborne Mo of up to 1,000 mg l(-1) did not activate a physiological or cellular stress response in fish. Information from this study suggests that Mo water quality guidelines for the protection of aquatic life are highly protective of freshwater fish, namely rainbow trout.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Tissue total protein concentration (mg g-1 tissue wet weight) in rainbow trout after 96 h molybdenum exposure.Tissue total protein is shown for liver, gill, heart and erythrocyte total protein in juvenile trout exposed to 0, 2 or 20 mg l-1 (A) and liver (B) and gill (C) in fingerling trout exposed to 0, 2, 20 or 1,000 mg l-1molybdenum. Fingerlings were sampled prior to (PE = pre-exposure) and at 8, 24, and 96 h of exposure. Data plotted as means ± 1 SEM (n = 6). No significant differences (p>0.05) were found.
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pone.0115334.g003: Tissue total protein concentration (mg g-1 tissue wet weight) in rainbow trout after 96 h molybdenum exposure.Tissue total protein is shown for liver, gill, heart and erythrocyte total protein in juvenile trout exposed to 0, 2 or 20 mg l-1 (A) and liver (B) and gill (C) in fingerling trout exposed to 0, 2, 20 or 1,000 mg l-1molybdenum. Fingerlings were sampled prior to (PE = pre-exposure) and at 8, 24, and 96 h of exposure. Data plotted as means ± 1 SEM (n = 6). No significant differences (p>0.05) were found.

Mentions: Total liver, gill, heart, and erythrocyte protein concentrations from juvenile fish sampled after 96 h of exposure to 2 or 20 mg l-1 of Mo showed no statistically significant differences when compared to controls (Fig. 3A). Similar results were observed in fingerling fish (Fig. 3 B, C). There were no significant differences in liver or gill total protein concentration in fish sampled from each of the exposure chambers (0, 2, 20, and 1,000 mg l-1) prior to exposure. During the exposure period all fingerlings responded with a lack of change in total protein in both tissues.


The effects of acute waterborne exposure to sublethal concentrations of molybdenum on the stress response in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

Ricketts CD, Bates WR, Reid SD - PLoS ONE (2015)

Tissue total protein concentration (mg g-1 tissue wet weight) in rainbow trout after 96 h molybdenum exposure.Tissue total protein is shown for liver, gill, heart and erythrocyte total protein in juvenile trout exposed to 0, 2 or 20 mg l-1 (A) and liver (B) and gill (C) in fingerling trout exposed to 0, 2, 20 or 1,000 mg l-1molybdenum. Fingerlings were sampled prior to (PE = pre-exposure) and at 8, 24, and 96 h of exposure. Data plotted as means ± 1 SEM (n = 6). No significant differences (p>0.05) were found.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4309612&req=5

pone.0115334.g003: Tissue total protein concentration (mg g-1 tissue wet weight) in rainbow trout after 96 h molybdenum exposure.Tissue total protein is shown for liver, gill, heart and erythrocyte total protein in juvenile trout exposed to 0, 2 or 20 mg l-1 (A) and liver (B) and gill (C) in fingerling trout exposed to 0, 2, 20 or 1,000 mg l-1molybdenum. Fingerlings were sampled prior to (PE = pre-exposure) and at 8, 24, and 96 h of exposure. Data plotted as means ± 1 SEM (n = 6). No significant differences (p>0.05) were found.
Mentions: Total liver, gill, heart, and erythrocyte protein concentrations from juvenile fish sampled after 96 h of exposure to 2 or 20 mg l-1 of Mo showed no statistically significant differences when compared to controls (Fig. 3A). Similar results were observed in fingerling fish (Fig. 3 B, C). There were no significant differences in liver or gill total protein concentration in fish sampled from each of the exposure chambers (0, 2, 20, and 1,000 mg l-1) prior to exposure. During the exposure period all fingerlings responded with a lack of change in total protein in both tissues.

Bottom Line: Heat shock protein 72 was not induced as a result of exposure and there were no detectable changes in total hsp70 (72 and 73), hsp90, and MT levels in any of the tissues relative to controls.These experiments demonstrate that exposure to waterborne Mo of up to 1,000 mg l(-1) did not activate a physiological or cellular stress response in fish.Information from this study suggests that Mo water quality guidelines for the protection of aquatic life are highly protective of freshwater fish, namely rainbow trout.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, University of British Columbia, Okanagan campus, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada, V1V 1V7.

ABSTRACT
To determine if molybdenum (Mo) is a chemical stressor, fingerling and juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to waterborne sodium molybdate (0, 2, 20, or 1,000 mg l-1 of Mo) and components of the physiological (plasma cortisol, blood glucose, and hematocrit) and cellular (heat shock protein [hsp] 72, hsp73, and hsp90 in the liver, gills, heart, and erythrocytes and metallothionein [MT] in the liver and gills) stress responses were measured prior to initiation of exposure and at 8, 24, and 96 h. During the acute exposure, plasma cortisol, blood glucose, and hematocrit levels remained unchanged in all treatments. Heat shock protein 72 was not induced as a result of exposure and there were no detectable changes in total hsp70 (72 and 73), hsp90, and MT levels in any of the tissues relative to controls. Both fingerling and juvenile fish responded with similar lack of apparent sensitivity to Mo exposure. These experiments demonstrate that exposure to waterborne Mo of up to 1,000 mg l(-1) did not activate a physiological or cellular stress response in fish. Information from this study suggests that Mo water quality guidelines for the protection of aquatic life are highly protective of freshwater fish, namely rainbow trout.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus