Limits...
Evidence for high dispersal ability and mito-nuclear discordance in the small brown planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus.

Sun JT, Wang MM, Zhang YK, Chapuis MP, Jiang XY, Hu G, Yang XM, Ge C, Xue XF, Hong XY - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Our results showed that the SBPH populations in China lack significant differences in genetic structure, suggesting extensive gene flow.Multilocus sequence typing revealed that Wolbachia infection was systematic and due to the same strain (wStri) within and across populations.We explain this mito-nuclear discordance as a result of historical population recolonization or mitochondria adaptation to climate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Entomology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210095, China.

ABSTRACT
Understanding dispersal ability in pest species is critical for both theoretical aspects of evolutionary and population biology and from a practical standpoint, such as implementing effective forecasting systems. The small brown planthopper (SBPH), Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén), is an economically important pest, but few data exist on its dispersal ability. Here, we used mitochondrial and nuclear markers to elucidate the population genetic structure of SBPH and of the parasitic bacterium Wolbachia throughout temperate and subtropical China. Our results showed that the SBPH populations in China lack significant differences in genetic structure, suggesting extensive gene flow. Multilocus sequence typing revealed that Wolbachia infection was systematic and due to the same strain (wStri) within and across populations. However, the mtDNA haplogroups had a nonrandom distribution across the sampling localities, which correlated to latitudinal and climatic gradients. We explain this mito-nuclear discordance as a result of historical population recolonization or mitochondria adaptation to climate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mismatch distributions (A) and Bayesian skyline plots (B).(B) Dark lines represent mean inferred effective population size (Nef) multiplied by thegeneration time (T) in years, blue areas mark the 95% highest probability density (HPD) intervals.Nef × T·is presented on a logarithmic scale.
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f7: Mismatch distributions (A) and Bayesian skyline plots (B).(B) Dark lines represent mean inferred effective population size (Nef) multiplied by thegeneration time (T) in years, blue areas mark the 95% highest probability density (HPD) intervals.Nef × T·is presented on a logarithmic scale.

Mentions: For neutrality tests, significantly negative Tajima's D values (−2.127,P < 0.001) and Fu's FS (−26.018, P < 0.001) werefound over all populations. The mismatch distribution over all populations was deemed unimodal andfailed to reject the hypothesis of a sudden expansion because of the small, non-significantHarpending's raggedness (HR) index (0.063, P = 0.294, Fig. 7A). ABayesian skyline plot (BSP) revealed a relatively explicit demographic history for populationexpansion by showing that the SBPH population underwent a sharp demographic expansion (~100 to 1000fold) (Fig. 7B).


Evidence for high dispersal ability and mito-nuclear discordance in the small brown planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus.

Sun JT, Wang MM, Zhang YK, Chapuis MP, Jiang XY, Hu G, Yang XM, Ge C, Xue XF, Hong XY - Sci Rep (2015)

Mismatch distributions (A) and Bayesian skyline plots (B).(B) Dark lines represent mean inferred effective population size (Nef) multiplied by thegeneration time (T) in years, blue areas mark the 95% highest probability density (HPD) intervals.Nef × T·is presented on a logarithmic scale.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4309506&req=5

f7: Mismatch distributions (A) and Bayesian skyline plots (B).(B) Dark lines represent mean inferred effective population size (Nef) multiplied by thegeneration time (T) in years, blue areas mark the 95% highest probability density (HPD) intervals.Nef × T·is presented on a logarithmic scale.
Mentions: For neutrality tests, significantly negative Tajima's D values (−2.127,P < 0.001) and Fu's FS (−26.018, P < 0.001) werefound over all populations. The mismatch distribution over all populations was deemed unimodal andfailed to reject the hypothesis of a sudden expansion because of the small, non-significantHarpending's raggedness (HR) index (0.063, P = 0.294, Fig. 7A). ABayesian skyline plot (BSP) revealed a relatively explicit demographic history for populationexpansion by showing that the SBPH population underwent a sharp demographic expansion (~100 to 1000fold) (Fig. 7B).

Bottom Line: Our results showed that the SBPH populations in China lack significant differences in genetic structure, suggesting extensive gene flow.Multilocus sequence typing revealed that Wolbachia infection was systematic and due to the same strain (wStri) within and across populations.We explain this mito-nuclear discordance as a result of historical population recolonization or mitochondria adaptation to climate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Entomology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210095, China.

ABSTRACT
Understanding dispersal ability in pest species is critical for both theoretical aspects of evolutionary and population biology and from a practical standpoint, such as implementing effective forecasting systems. The small brown planthopper (SBPH), Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén), is an economically important pest, but few data exist on its dispersal ability. Here, we used mitochondrial and nuclear markers to elucidate the population genetic structure of SBPH and of the parasitic bacterium Wolbachia throughout temperate and subtropical China. Our results showed that the SBPH populations in China lack significant differences in genetic structure, suggesting extensive gene flow. Multilocus sequence typing revealed that Wolbachia infection was systematic and due to the same strain (wStri) within and across populations. However, the mtDNA haplogroups had a nonrandom distribution across the sampling localities, which correlated to latitudinal and climatic gradients. We explain this mito-nuclear discordance as a result of historical population recolonization or mitochondria adaptation to climate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus