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Visual recognition of the elderly concerning risks of falling or stumbling indoors in the home: -comparison of visual attention points among elderly, middle aged and young individuals-.

Katsura T, Miura N, Hoshino A, Usui K, Takahashi Y, Hisamoto S - J Rural Med (2011)

Bottom Line: The rate of recognizing middle steps in the elderly was significantly lower than that in younger and middle-aged individuals.However, although the recognition rate in the elderly was lower than in younger and middle-aged individuals, no significant difference was observed. 2) When moving indoors, all of the elderly, middle-aged and young individuals showed a recognition rate of 70%-80%.The rate of recognizing steps of doorsills as well as obstacles in a Japanese-style room was lower in the elderly in comparison with middle-aged or young individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Preventive Nursing, Department of Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The objective of this study was to verify the recognition of dangers and obstacles within a house in the elderly when walking based on analyses of gaze point fixation.

Materials and methods: The rate of recognizing indoor dangers was compared among 30 elderly, 14 middle-aged and 11 young individuals using the Eye Mark Recorder.

Results: 1) All of the elderly, middle-aged and young individuals showed a high recognition rate of 100% or near 100% when ascending outdoor steps but a low rate of recognizing obstacles placed on the steps. They showed a recognition rate of about 60% when descending steps from residential premises to the street. The rate of recognizing middle steps in the elderly was significantly lower than that in younger and middle-aged individuals. Regarding recognition indoors, when ascending stairs, all of the elderly, middle-aged and young individuals showed a high recognition rate of nearly 100%. When descending stairs, they showed a recognition rate of 70-90%. However, although the recognition rate in the elderly was lower than in younger and middle-aged individuals, no significant difference was observed. 2) When moving indoors, all of the elderly, middle-aged and young individuals showed a recognition rate of 70%-80%. The recognition rate was high regarding obstacles such as floors, televisions and chests of drawers but low for obstacles in the bathroom and steps on the path. The rate of recognizing steps of doorsills forming the division between a Japanese-style room and corridor as well as obstacles in a Japanese-style room was low, and the rate in the elderly was low, being 40% or less.

Conclusion: The rate of recognizing steps of doorsills as well as obstacles in a Japanese-style room was lower in the elderly in comparison with middle-aged or young individuals.

No MeSH data available.


Visual recognition of points risky for falling or stumbling indoors at home.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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fig_004: Visual recognition of points risky for falling or stumbling indoors at home.

Mentions: Visual recognition of points risky for falling or stumbling indoors at home.


Visual recognition of the elderly concerning risks of falling or stumbling indoors in the home: -comparison of visual attention points among elderly, middle aged and young individuals-.

Katsura T, Miura N, Hoshino A, Usui K, Takahashi Y, Hisamoto S - J Rural Med (2011)

Visual recognition of points risky for falling or stumbling indoors at home.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4309355&req=5

fig_004: Visual recognition of points risky for falling or stumbling indoors at home.
Mentions: Visual recognition of points risky for falling or stumbling indoors at home.

Bottom Line: The rate of recognizing middle steps in the elderly was significantly lower than that in younger and middle-aged individuals.However, although the recognition rate in the elderly was lower than in younger and middle-aged individuals, no significant difference was observed. 2) When moving indoors, all of the elderly, middle-aged and young individuals showed a recognition rate of 70%-80%.The rate of recognizing steps of doorsills as well as obstacles in a Japanese-style room was lower in the elderly in comparison with middle-aged or young individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Preventive Nursing, Department of Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The objective of this study was to verify the recognition of dangers and obstacles within a house in the elderly when walking based on analyses of gaze point fixation.

Materials and methods: The rate of recognizing indoor dangers was compared among 30 elderly, 14 middle-aged and 11 young individuals using the Eye Mark Recorder.

Results: 1) All of the elderly, middle-aged and young individuals showed a high recognition rate of 100% or near 100% when ascending outdoor steps but a low rate of recognizing obstacles placed on the steps. They showed a recognition rate of about 60% when descending steps from residential premises to the street. The rate of recognizing middle steps in the elderly was significantly lower than that in younger and middle-aged individuals. Regarding recognition indoors, when ascending stairs, all of the elderly, middle-aged and young individuals showed a high recognition rate of nearly 100%. When descending stairs, they showed a recognition rate of 70-90%. However, although the recognition rate in the elderly was lower than in younger and middle-aged individuals, no significant difference was observed. 2) When moving indoors, all of the elderly, middle-aged and young individuals showed a recognition rate of 70%-80%. The recognition rate was high regarding obstacles such as floors, televisions and chests of drawers but low for obstacles in the bathroom and steps on the path. The rate of recognizing steps of doorsills forming the division between a Japanese-style room and corridor as well as obstacles in a Japanese-style room was low, and the rate in the elderly was low, being 40% or less.

Conclusion: The rate of recognizing steps of doorsills as well as obstacles in a Japanese-style room was lower in the elderly in comparison with middle-aged or young individuals.

No MeSH data available.