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Intraosseous ganglion of the distal tibia: clinical, radiological, and operative management.

Sedeek SM, Choudry Q, Garg S - Case Rep Orthop (2015)

Bottom Line: Intraosseous ganglion cysts of the ankle are relatively uncommon.We present a case of recurrent intraosseous ganglion in the ankle of a 41-year-old female who had recurrence after initial surgery.At the final follow-up, satisfactory results were obtained with no recurrence or complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, Blackburn BB2 3HH, UK.

ABSTRACT
Intraosseous ganglia are benign cystic lesions located in the subchondral bone. Intraosseous ganglion cysts of the ankle are relatively uncommon. We present a case of recurrent intraosseous ganglion in the ankle of a 41-year-old female who had recurrence after initial surgery. She was treated effectively by curettage and autogenous cancellous bone grafting. At the final follow-up, satisfactory results were obtained with no recurrence or complications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

AP X-ray of ankle showing cystic lesion in distal tibia.
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fig2: AP X-ray of ankle showing cystic lesion in distal tibia.

Mentions: A 41-year-old woman presented with a 2-year history of right ankle pain and limping which had deteriorated in the past 6 months. There was no history of trauma. On examination, there was no effusion swelling or tenderness of the right ankle. The patient had full range of motion in her ankle, and there was no vascular or neurological abnormality. Inflammatory blood markers were elevated. Plain radiographs demonstrated a cystic lesion of the lower tibia extending into the medial malleolus (Figures 1 and 2). Benign cyst, nonossifying fibroma, and Brodie abscess were considered in the differential diagnosis. A Brodie abscess was thought to be the likely cause and she underwent percutaneous drilling under image guidance. Intraoperatively there was no pus detected; a swab for culture and sensitivity was taken. No organisms were grown from the microbiology swab specimen. Postoperatively she was afebrile and able to mobilise and was discharged home with a simple dressing. At follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic. The cavity was radiologically filled and she returned to work.


Intraosseous ganglion of the distal tibia: clinical, radiological, and operative management.

Sedeek SM, Choudry Q, Garg S - Case Rep Orthop (2015)

AP X-ray of ankle showing cystic lesion in distal tibia.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4309300&req=5

fig2: AP X-ray of ankle showing cystic lesion in distal tibia.
Mentions: A 41-year-old woman presented with a 2-year history of right ankle pain and limping which had deteriorated in the past 6 months. There was no history of trauma. On examination, there was no effusion swelling or tenderness of the right ankle. The patient had full range of motion in her ankle, and there was no vascular or neurological abnormality. Inflammatory blood markers were elevated. Plain radiographs demonstrated a cystic lesion of the lower tibia extending into the medial malleolus (Figures 1 and 2). Benign cyst, nonossifying fibroma, and Brodie abscess were considered in the differential diagnosis. A Brodie abscess was thought to be the likely cause and she underwent percutaneous drilling under image guidance. Intraoperatively there was no pus detected; a swab for culture and sensitivity was taken. No organisms were grown from the microbiology swab specimen. Postoperatively she was afebrile and able to mobilise and was discharged home with a simple dressing. At follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic. The cavity was radiologically filled and she returned to work.

Bottom Line: Intraosseous ganglion cysts of the ankle are relatively uncommon.We present a case of recurrent intraosseous ganglion in the ankle of a 41-year-old female who had recurrence after initial surgery.At the final follow-up, satisfactory results were obtained with no recurrence or complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, Blackburn BB2 3HH, UK.

ABSTRACT
Intraosseous ganglia are benign cystic lesions located in the subchondral bone. Intraosseous ganglion cysts of the ankle are relatively uncommon. We present a case of recurrent intraosseous ganglion in the ankle of a 41-year-old female who had recurrence after initial surgery. She was treated effectively by curettage and autogenous cancellous bone grafting. At the final follow-up, satisfactory results were obtained with no recurrence or complications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus