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A whole-genome microarray study of Arabidopsis thaliana semisolid callus cultures exposed to microgravity and nonmicrogravity related spaceflight conditions for 5 days on board of Shenzhou 8.

Fengler S, Spirer I, Neef M, Ecke M, Nieselt K, Hampp R - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: The results show a major impact of nonmicrogravity related spaceflight conditions.In contrast to short-term effects of microgravity (seconds, minutes), this mission identified only minor changes after 5 days of microgravity.These concerned genes coding for proteins involved in the plastid-associated translation machinery, mitochondrial electron transport, and energy production.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physiological Ecology of Plants, University of Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 1, 72076 Tübingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The Simbox mission was the first joint space project between Germany and China in November 2011. Eleven-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana wild type semisolid callus cultures were integrated into fully automated plant cultivation containers and exposed to spaceflight conditions within the Simbox hardware on board of the spacecraft Shenzhou 8. The related ground experiment was conducted under similar conditions. The use of an in-flight centrifuge provided a 1 g gravitational field in space. The cells were metabolically quenched after 5 days via RNAlater injection. The impact on the Arabidopsis transcriptome was investigated by means of whole-genome gene expression analysis. The results show a major impact of nonmicrogravity related spaceflight conditions. Genes that were significantly altered in transcript abundance are mainly involved in protein phosphorylation and MAPK cascade-related signaling processes, as well as in the cellular defense and stress responses. In contrast to short-term effects of microgravity (seconds, minutes), this mission identified only minor changes after 5 days of microgravity. These concerned genes coding for proteins involved in the plastid-associated translation machinery, mitochondrial electron transport, and energy production.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Temperature profile as recorded by 3 temperature sensors (TP1-3) attached to the Simbox incubator during integration of ECs into the incubator, transport to Shenzhou, and launch (data: Astrium).
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fig4: Temperature profile as recorded by 3 temperature sensors (TP1-3) attached to the Simbox incubator during integration of ECs into the incubator, transport to Shenzhou, and launch (data: Astrium).

Mentions: One day before the launch, 11-day-old semisolid callus cultures were transferred into the CCs with 2 mL agar containing medium (Figures 2 and 3). Two ECs were used for the spaceflight (flight models: FM 16001 and FM 16002) and one for the ground experiment (FM 16003), respectively. One of the two ECs was contained in the centrifuge rotor, and the other one was fixed at the experiment/static platform (flight platform), respectively (Figure 1). Metabolic quenching of the samples was by the injection of RNAlater (Ambion, Life Technologies, Darmstadt, Germany). This reagent is also used to stabilize nucleic acids. Twenty mL of this fixative was filled into the fixative/waste unit attached to the bottom of the EC. Between handover and integration into the Simbox flight/ground incubator, the ECs were stored at nominal laboratory temperature conditions (22–24°C). The Simbox incubator was unpowered for about 3 hours during transport to the spacecraft. During this time, the lowest temperature was 21°C (Figure 4).


A whole-genome microarray study of Arabidopsis thaliana semisolid callus cultures exposed to microgravity and nonmicrogravity related spaceflight conditions for 5 days on board of Shenzhou 8.

Fengler S, Spirer I, Neef M, Ecke M, Nieselt K, Hampp R - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Temperature profile as recorded by 3 temperature sensors (TP1-3) attached to the Simbox incubator during integration of ECs into the incubator, transport to Shenzhou, and launch (data: Astrium).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4309294&req=5

fig4: Temperature profile as recorded by 3 temperature sensors (TP1-3) attached to the Simbox incubator during integration of ECs into the incubator, transport to Shenzhou, and launch (data: Astrium).
Mentions: One day before the launch, 11-day-old semisolid callus cultures were transferred into the CCs with 2 mL agar containing medium (Figures 2 and 3). Two ECs were used for the spaceflight (flight models: FM 16001 and FM 16002) and one for the ground experiment (FM 16003), respectively. One of the two ECs was contained in the centrifuge rotor, and the other one was fixed at the experiment/static platform (flight platform), respectively (Figure 1). Metabolic quenching of the samples was by the injection of RNAlater (Ambion, Life Technologies, Darmstadt, Germany). This reagent is also used to stabilize nucleic acids. Twenty mL of this fixative was filled into the fixative/waste unit attached to the bottom of the EC. Between handover and integration into the Simbox flight/ground incubator, the ECs were stored at nominal laboratory temperature conditions (22–24°C). The Simbox incubator was unpowered for about 3 hours during transport to the spacecraft. During this time, the lowest temperature was 21°C (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: The results show a major impact of nonmicrogravity related spaceflight conditions.In contrast to short-term effects of microgravity (seconds, minutes), this mission identified only minor changes after 5 days of microgravity.These concerned genes coding for proteins involved in the plastid-associated translation machinery, mitochondrial electron transport, and energy production.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physiological Ecology of Plants, University of Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 1, 72076 Tübingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The Simbox mission was the first joint space project between Germany and China in November 2011. Eleven-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana wild type semisolid callus cultures were integrated into fully automated plant cultivation containers and exposed to spaceflight conditions within the Simbox hardware on board of the spacecraft Shenzhou 8. The related ground experiment was conducted under similar conditions. The use of an in-flight centrifuge provided a 1 g gravitational field in space. The cells were metabolically quenched after 5 days via RNAlater injection. The impact on the Arabidopsis transcriptome was investigated by means of whole-genome gene expression analysis. The results show a major impact of nonmicrogravity related spaceflight conditions. Genes that were significantly altered in transcript abundance are mainly involved in protein phosphorylation and MAPK cascade-related signaling processes, as well as in the cellular defense and stress responses. In contrast to short-term effects of microgravity (seconds, minutes), this mission identified only minor changes after 5 days of microgravity. These concerned genes coding for proteins involved in the plastid-associated translation machinery, mitochondrial electron transport, and energy production.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus