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Clinical Alarms in intensive care: implications of alarm fatigue for the safety of patients.

Bridi AC, Louro TQ, da Silva RC - Rev Lat Am Enfermagem (2014)

Bottom Line: to identify the number of electro-medical pieces of equipment in a coronary care unit, characterize their types, and analyze implications for the safety of patients from the perspective of alarm fatigue. this quantitative, observational, descriptive, non-participatory study was conducted in a coronary care unit of a cardiology hospital with 170 beds. a total of 426 alarms were recorded in 40 hours of observation: 227 were triggered by multi-parametric monitors and 199 were triggered by other equipment (infusion pumps, dialysis pumps, mechanical ventilators, and intra-aortic balloons); that is an average of 10.6 alarms per hour. the results reinforce the importance of properly configuring physiological variables, the volume and parameters of alarms of multi-parametric monitors within the routine of intensive care units.The alarms of equipment intended to protect patients have increased noise within the unit, the level of distraction and interruptions in the workflow, leading to a false sense of security.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: to identify the number of electro-medical pieces of equipment in a coronary care unit, characterize their types, and analyze implications for the safety of patients from the perspective of alarm fatigue.

Method: this quantitative, observational, descriptive, non-participatory study was conducted in a coronary care unit of a cardiology hospital with 170 beds.

Results: a total of 426 alarms were recorded in 40 hours of observation: 227 were triggered by multi-parametric monitors and 199 were triggered by other equipment (infusion pumps, dialysis pumps, mechanical ventilators, and intra-aortic balloons); that is an average of 10.6 alarms per hour.

Conclusion: the results reinforce the importance of properly configuring physiological variables, the volume and parameters of alarms of multi-parametric monitors within the routine of intensive care units. The alarms of equipment intended to protect patients have increased noise within the unit, the level of distraction and interruptions in the workflow, leading to a false sense of security.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Boxplot concerning the volume of the alarms of the multi-parametricmonitors under observation. DS - Day Shift NS - Night Shift. Alarmvolume: a median 75 with an IQR of 60 - 90 during the DS and a median of 90with an IQR of 60 - 90 in the NS.
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f01: Boxplot concerning the volume of the alarms of the multi-parametricmonitors under observation. DS - Day Shift NS - Night Shift. Alarmvolume: a median 75 with an IQR of 60 - 90 during the DS and a median of 90with an IQR of 60 - 90 in the NS.

Mentions: This study's results show that the alarms of monitors under observation were set at alow volume (Figure 1). The monitors' volumes wereadjusted from 0 to 255 dB, i.e., the staff can adjust the monitors to a very low volume,which may become inaudible due to the total number of alarms going off within the unitcombined with other environmental noise.


Clinical Alarms in intensive care: implications of alarm fatigue for the safety of patients.

Bridi AC, Louro TQ, da Silva RC - Rev Lat Am Enfermagem (2014)

Boxplot concerning the volume of the alarms of the multi-parametricmonitors under observation. DS - Day Shift NS - Night Shift. Alarmvolume: a median 75 with an IQR of 60 - 90 during the DS and a median of 90with an IQR of 60 - 90 in the NS.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4309240&req=5

f01: Boxplot concerning the volume of the alarms of the multi-parametricmonitors under observation. DS - Day Shift NS - Night Shift. Alarmvolume: a median 75 with an IQR of 60 - 90 during the DS and a median of 90with an IQR of 60 - 90 in the NS.
Mentions: This study's results show that the alarms of monitors under observation were set at alow volume (Figure 1). The monitors' volumes wereadjusted from 0 to 255 dB, i.e., the staff can adjust the monitors to a very low volume,which may become inaudible due to the total number of alarms going off within the unitcombined with other environmental noise.

Bottom Line: to identify the number of electro-medical pieces of equipment in a coronary care unit, characterize their types, and analyze implications for the safety of patients from the perspective of alarm fatigue. this quantitative, observational, descriptive, non-participatory study was conducted in a coronary care unit of a cardiology hospital with 170 beds. a total of 426 alarms were recorded in 40 hours of observation: 227 were triggered by multi-parametric monitors and 199 were triggered by other equipment (infusion pumps, dialysis pumps, mechanical ventilators, and intra-aortic balloons); that is an average of 10.6 alarms per hour. the results reinforce the importance of properly configuring physiological variables, the volume and parameters of alarms of multi-parametric monitors within the routine of intensive care units.The alarms of equipment intended to protect patients have increased noise within the unit, the level of distraction and interruptions in the workflow, leading to a false sense of security.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: to identify the number of electro-medical pieces of equipment in a coronary care unit, characterize their types, and analyze implications for the safety of patients from the perspective of alarm fatigue.

Method: this quantitative, observational, descriptive, non-participatory study was conducted in a coronary care unit of a cardiology hospital with 170 beds.

Results: a total of 426 alarms were recorded in 40 hours of observation: 227 were triggered by multi-parametric monitors and 199 were triggered by other equipment (infusion pumps, dialysis pumps, mechanical ventilators, and intra-aortic balloons); that is an average of 10.6 alarms per hour.

Conclusion: the results reinforce the importance of properly configuring physiological variables, the volume and parameters of alarms of multi-parametric monitors within the routine of intensive care units. The alarms of equipment intended to protect patients have increased noise within the unit, the level of distraction and interruptions in the workflow, leading to a false sense of security.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus