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Evaluation of perineal muscle strength in the first trimester of pregnancy.

Caroci Ade S, Riesco ML, Rocha BM, Ventura Lde J, Oliveira SG - Rev Lat Am Enfermagem (2015)

Bottom Line: to analyze the Pelvic Floor Muscle Strength (PFMS) of pregnant women with one or more vaginal or cesarean deliveries; to compare the PFMS of these with pregnant women with the PFMS of primiparous women. cross-sectional study with women up to 12 weeks pregnant, performed in Itapecerica da Serra, São Paulo state, from December 2012 to May 2013.From the perineometry, there was no statistically significant difference between the PFMS and age, type of delivery, parity, body mass index, and genitourinary tract symptoms, however, there was a statistically significant difference between the pregnant women with and without a history of episiotomy (p=0.04).In the palpation, none of the variables showed a statistically significant difference. pregnancy and childbirth can reduce the PFMS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Escola de Artes, Ciências e Humanidades, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: to analyze the Pelvic Floor Muscle Strength (PFMS) of pregnant women with one or more vaginal or cesarean deliveries; to compare the PFMS of these with pregnant women with the PFMS of primiparous women.

Methods: cross-sectional study with women up to 12 weeks pregnant, performed in Itapecerica da Serra, São Paulo state, from December 2012 to May 2013. The sample consisted of 110 pregnant women with one or more vaginal deliveries or cesarean sections and 110 primigravidae. The PFMS was evaluated by perineometry (Peritron(tm)) and vaginal digital palpation (modified Oxford scale).

Results: the average PFMS in pregnant women with a history of vaginal delivery or cesarean section was 33.4 (SD=21.2) cmH2O. From the Oxford scale, 75.4% of the pregnant women with previous vaginal or cesarean deliveries presented grade ≤ 2, and 5.5% grade ≥ 4; among the primiparae, 39.9% presented grade ≤ 2, and 50.9% grade ≥ 4, with a statistically significant difference (p<0.001). From the perineometry, there was no statistically significant difference between the PFMS and age, type of delivery, parity, body mass index, and genitourinary tract symptoms, however, there was a statistically significant difference between the pregnant women with and without a history of episiotomy (p=0.04). In the palpation, none of the variables showed a statistically significant difference.

Conclusion: pregnancy and childbirth can reduce the PFMS.

No MeSH data available.


Flowchart of the pregnant women that participated in the study. Itapecericada Serra, SP, Brazil. December 2012 to May 2013
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f01: Flowchart of the pregnant women that participated in the study. Itapecericada Serra, SP, Brazil. December 2012 to May 2013


Evaluation of perineal muscle strength in the first trimester of pregnancy.

Caroci Ade S, Riesco ML, Rocha BM, Ventura Lde J, Oliveira SG - Rev Lat Am Enfermagem (2015)

Flowchart of the pregnant women that participated in the study. Itapecericada Serra, SP, Brazil. December 2012 to May 2013
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4309222&req=5

f01: Flowchart of the pregnant women that participated in the study. Itapecericada Serra, SP, Brazil. December 2012 to May 2013
Bottom Line: to analyze the Pelvic Floor Muscle Strength (PFMS) of pregnant women with one or more vaginal or cesarean deliveries; to compare the PFMS of these with pregnant women with the PFMS of primiparous women. cross-sectional study with women up to 12 weeks pregnant, performed in Itapecerica da Serra, São Paulo state, from December 2012 to May 2013.From the perineometry, there was no statistically significant difference between the PFMS and age, type of delivery, parity, body mass index, and genitourinary tract symptoms, however, there was a statistically significant difference between the pregnant women with and without a history of episiotomy (p=0.04).In the palpation, none of the variables showed a statistically significant difference. pregnancy and childbirth can reduce the PFMS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Escola de Artes, Ciências e Humanidades, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: to analyze the Pelvic Floor Muscle Strength (PFMS) of pregnant women with one or more vaginal or cesarean deliveries; to compare the PFMS of these with pregnant women with the PFMS of primiparous women.

Methods: cross-sectional study with women up to 12 weeks pregnant, performed in Itapecerica da Serra, São Paulo state, from December 2012 to May 2013. The sample consisted of 110 pregnant women with one or more vaginal deliveries or cesarean sections and 110 primigravidae. The PFMS was evaluated by perineometry (Peritron(tm)) and vaginal digital palpation (modified Oxford scale).

Results: the average PFMS in pregnant women with a history of vaginal delivery or cesarean section was 33.4 (SD=21.2) cmH2O. From the Oxford scale, 75.4% of the pregnant women with previous vaginal or cesarean deliveries presented grade ≤ 2, and 5.5% grade ≥ 4; among the primiparae, 39.9% presented grade ≤ 2, and 50.9% grade ≥ 4, with a statistically significant difference (p<0.001). From the perineometry, there was no statistically significant difference between the PFMS and age, type of delivery, parity, body mass index, and genitourinary tract symptoms, however, there was a statistically significant difference between the pregnant women with and without a history of episiotomy (p=0.04). In the palpation, none of the variables showed a statistically significant difference.

Conclusion: pregnancy and childbirth can reduce the PFMS.

No MeSH data available.