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Plain cigarette packs do not exert Pavlovian to instrumental transfer of control over tobacco-seeking.

Hogarth L, Maynard OM, Munafò MR - Addiction (2014)

Bottom Line: Both experiments found that branded packs primed a greater percentage of tobacco-seeking (overall mean = 62%) than plain packs (overall mean = 53%) and the no-stimulus condition (overall mean = 52%; Ps ≤ 0.01, ŋp (2) s ≥ 0.16), and that there was no difference in percentage tobacco-seeking between plain packs and the no-stimulus condition (Ps ≥ 0.17, ŋp (2) s ≤ 0.04).Plain tobacco packs showed an overall 9% reduction in the priming of a tobacco choice response compared to branded tobacco packs.Plain packaging may reduce smoking in current smokers by degrading cue-elicited tobacco-seeking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK; School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

No MeSH data available.


Examples of the cigarette pack stimuli presented on-screen prior to choice between the tobacco- versus chocolate-seeking response in the Pavlovian to instrumental transfer (PIT) test: (a) plain pack; (b) branded pack
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fig01: Examples of the cigarette pack stimuli presented on-screen prior to choice between the tobacco- versus chocolate-seeking response in the Pavlovian to instrumental transfer (PIT) test: (a) plain pack; (b) branded pack

Mentions: Experiment 1 used the previously described PIT procedure to test whether plain cigarette pack stimuli would show reduced control over tobacco-seeking than branded pack stimuli. Smokers were first trained on a concurrent choice task in which one response earned tobacco points for a branded cigarette pack, whereas the alternative response earned chocolate points. In the PIT test that followed, choice between the two responses was tested in extinction during presentation of either an image of a plain pack (Fig. 1a, from 5,6) or a branded UK pack (Fig. 1b). Blank no-stimulus trials were intermixed randomly. It was expected that whereas branded pack stimuli would augment the tobacco-seeking response relative to no-stimulus trials consistent with previous data 11–13,15, plain pack stimuli may show reduced capacity to elicit the tobacco-seeking, demonstrating their degraded discriminative control.


Plain cigarette packs do not exert Pavlovian to instrumental transfer of control over tobacco-seeking.

Hogarth L, Maynard OM, Munafò MR - Addiction (2014)

Examples of the cigarette pack stimuli presented on-screen prior to choice between the tobacco- versus chocolate-seeking response in the Pavlovian to instrumental transfer (PIT) test: (a) plain pack; (b) branded pack
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4309177&req=5

fig01: Examples of the cigarette pack stimuli presented on-screen prior to choice between the tobacco- versus chocolate-seeking response in the Pavlovian to instrumental transfer (PIT) test: (a) plain pack; (b) branded pack
Mentions: Experiment 1 used the previously described PIT procedure to test whether plain cigarette pack stimuli would show reduced control over tobacco-seeking than branded pack stimuli. Smokers were first trained on a concurrent choice task in which one response earned tobacco points for a branded cigarette pack, whereas the alternative response earned chocolate points. In the PIT test that followed, choice between the two responses was tested in extinction during presentation of either an image of a plain pack (Fig. 1a, from 5,6) or a branded UK pack (Fig. 1b). Blank no-stimulus trials were intermixed randomly. It was expected that whereas branded pack stimuli would augment the tobacco-seeking response relative to no-stimulus trials consistent with previous data 11–13,15, plain pack stimuli may show reduced capacity to elicit the tobacco-seeking, demonstrating their degraded discriminative control.

Bottom Line: Both experiments found that branded packs primed a greater percentage of tobacco-seeking (overall mean = 62%) than plain packs (overall mean = 53%) and the no-stimulus condition (overall mean = 52%; Ps ≤ 0.01, ŋp (2) s ≥ 0.16), and that there was no difference in percentage tobacco-seeking between plain packs and the no-stimulus condition (Ps ≥ 0.17, ŋp (2) s ≤ 0.04).Plain tobacco packs showed an overall 9% reduction in the priming of a tobacco choice response compared to branded tobacco packs.Plain packaging may reduce smoking in current smokers by degrading cue-elicited tobacco-seeking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK; School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

No MeSH data available.