Limits...
An exploratory study into the effects of extraordinary nature on emotions, mood, and prosociality.

Joye Y, Bolderdijk JW - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: However, little research has yet examined the psychological benefits of extraordinary, awe-evoking kinds of nature, such as spectacular mountain scenes or impressive waterfalls.Our analyses revealed that, compared to mundane nature and a neutral condition, watching awesome natural scenes and phenomena had some unique and pronounced emotional effects (e.g., feeling small and humble), triggered the most mood improvement, and led to a more prosocial SVO.We found that participants' willingness to donate did not differ significantly for any of the conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Marketing, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Groningen Groningen, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Environmental psychology research has demonstrated that exposure to mundane natural environments can be psychologically beneficial, and can, for instance, improve individuals' mood and concentration. However, little research has yet examined the psychological benefits of extraordinary, awe-evoking kinds of nature, such as spectacular mountain scenes or impressive waterfalls. In this study, we aimed to address the underrepresentation of such extraordinary nature in research on human-nature interactions. Specifically, we examined whether watching a picture slideshow of awesome as opposed to mundane nature differentially affected individuals' emotions, mood, social value orientation (SVO), and their willingness to donate something to others. Our analyses revealed that, compared to mundane nature and a neutral condition, watching awesome natural scenes and phenomena had some unique and pronounced emotional effects (e.g., feeling small and humble), triggered the most mood improvement, and led to a more prosocial SVO. We found that participants' willingness to donate did not differ significantly for any of the conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pre- and post-slideshow mood scores as a function of (slideshow) condition (error bars represent 95% confidence intervals).
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Figure 2: Pre- and post-slideshow mood scores as a function of (slideshow) condition (error bars represent 95% confidence intervals).

Mentions: There was also a significant time of mood measurement by slideshow condition interaction, F(2, 199) = 16.79, p < 0.001, η2p = 0.14, indicating that mood changes differed depending on slideshow condition (see Figure 2). Specifically, in the two nature conditions, there was a pre- to post-slideshow mood improvement [awesome nature: F(1, 69) = 49.95, p < 0.001, η2p = 0.42; mundane nature: F(1, 67) = 5.46, p = 0.022, η2p = 0.07] whereas mood scores stayed virtually the same over time in the neutral condition [F(1, 63) = 2.00, p = 0.162, η2p = 0.03]. A significant time of mood measurement by slideshow condition interaction still remained, when only the two nature conditions were considered F(1, 136) = 9.98, p = 0.002, η2p = 0.06. This interaction shows a steeper pre- to post-slideshow mood improvement in the awesome nature condition than in the mundane nature condition.


An exploratory study into the effects of extraordinary nature on emotions, mood, and prosociality.

Joye Y, Bolderdijk JW - Front Psychol (2015)

Pre- and post-slideshow mood scores as a function of (slideshow) condition (error bars represent 95% confidence intervals).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4309161&req=5

Figure 2: Pre- and post-slideshow mood scores as a function of (slideshow) condition (error bars represent 95% confidence intervals).
Mentions: There was also a significant time of mood measurement by slideshow condition interaction, F(2, 199) = 16.79, p < 0.001, η2p = 0.14, indicating that mood changes differed depending on slideshow condition (see Figure 2). Specifically, in the two nature conditions, there was a pre- to post-slideshow mood improvement [awesome nature: F(1, 69) = 49.95, p < 0.001, η2p = 0.42; mundane nature: F(1, 67) = 5.46, p = 0.022, η2p = 0.07] whereas mood scores stayed virtually the same over time in the neutral condition [F(1, 63) = 2.00, p = 0.162, η2p = 0.03]. A significant time of mood measurement by slideshow condition interaction still remained, when only the two nature conditions were considered F(1, 136) = 9.98, p = 0.002, η2p = 0.06. This interaction shows a steeper pre- to post-slideshow mood improvement in the awesome nature condition than in the mundane nature condition.

Bottom Line: However, little research has yet examined the psychological benefits of extraordinary, awe-evoking kinds of nature, such as spectacular mountain scenes or impressive waterfalls.Our analyses revealed that, compared to mundane nature and a neutral condition, watching awesome natural scenes and phenomena had some unique and pronounced emotional effects (e.g., feeling small and humble), triggered the most mood improvement, and led to a more prosocial SVO.We found that participants' willingness to donate did not differ significantly for any of the conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Marketing, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Groningen Groningen, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Environmental psychology research has demonstrated that exposure to mundane natural environments can be psychologically beneficial, and can, for instance, improve individuals' mood and concentration. However, little research has yet examined the psychological benefits of extraordinary, awe-evoking kinds of nature, such as spectacular mountain scenes or impressive waterfalls. In this study, we aimed to address the underrepresentation of such extraordinary nature in research on human-nature interactions. Specifically, we examined whether watching a picture slideshow of awesome as opposed to mundane nature differentially affected individuals' emotions, mood, social value orientation (SVO), and their willingness to donate something to others. Our analyses revealed that, compared to mundane nature and a neutral condition, watching awesome natural scenes and phenomena had some unique and pronounced emotional effects (e.g., feeling small and humble), triggered the most mood improvement, and led to a more prosocial SVO. We found that participants' willingness to donate did not differ significantly for any of the conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus