Limits...
An exploratory study into the effects of extraordinary nature on emotions, mood, and prosociality.

Joye Y, Bolderdijk JW - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: However, little research has yet examined the psychological benefits of extraordinary, awe-evoking kinds of nature, such as spectacular mountain scenes or impressive waterfalls.Our analyses revealed that, compared to mundane nature and a neutral condition, watching awesome natural scenes and phenomena had some unique and pronounced emotional effects (e.g., feeling small and humble), triggered the most mood improvement, and led to a more prosocial SVO.We found that participants' willingness to donate did not differ significantly for any of the conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Marketing, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Groningen Groningen, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Environmental psychology research has demonstrated that exposure to mundane natural environments can be psychologically beneficial, and can, for instance, improve individuals' mood and concentration. However, little research has yet examined the psychological benefits of extraordinary, awe-evoking kinds of nature, such as spectacular mountain scenes or impressive waterfalls. In this study, we aimed to address the underrepresentation of such extraordinary nature in research on human-nature interactions. Specifically, we examined whether watching a picture slideshow of awesome as opposed to mundane nature differentially affected individuals' emotions, mood, social value orientation (SVO), and their willingness to donate something to others. Our analyses revealed that, compared to mundane nature and a neutral condition, watching awesome natural scenes and phenomena had some unique and pronounced emotional effects (e.g., feeling small and humble), triggered the most mood improvement, and led to a more prosocial SVO. We found that participants' willingness to donate did not differ significantly for any of the conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pictures of the awesome nature (left; credit: John Vetterli), mundane nature (middle), and neutral (right) condition. Note that due to reasons of copyright, the image of awesome nature and the control condition are not the ones used in the actual study. They are however highly similar to the original images.
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Figure 1: Pictures of the awesome nature (left; credit: John Vetterli), mundane nature (middle), and neutral (right) condition. Note that due to reasons of copyright, the image of awesome nature and the control condition are not the ones used in the actual study. They are however highly similar to the original images.

Mentions: The stimuli of this study were three different slideshows, each consisting of 14 different color photographs. Image resolution was kept relatively low (i.e., maximum 800 by 800 pixels) to ensure that the entire image would be fully displayed on the (computer) screen of all participants. The three slideshows depicted either neutral pictures (i.e., the “neutral” condition) or pictures of one of two nature types, namely “awesome nature” and “mundane nature” (see Figure 1 for sample pictures of these two nature conditions and the neutral condition)4. Using photographs of environments as experimental stimuli is highly common in environmental psychology research.


An exploratory study into the effects of extraordinary nature on emotions, mood, and prosociality.

Joye Y, Bolderdijk JW - Front Psychol (2015)

Pictures of the awesome nature (left; credit: John Vetterli), mundane nature (middle), and neutral (right) condition. Note that due to reasons of copyright, the image of awesome nature and the control condition are not the ones used in the actual study. They are however highly similar to the original images.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4309161&req=5

Figure 1: Pictures of the awesome nature (left; credit: John Vetterli), mundane nature (middle), and neutral (right) condition. Note that due to reasons of copyright, the image of awesome nature and the control condition are not the ones used in the actual study. They are however highly similar to the original images.
Mentions: The stimuli of this study were three different slideshows, each consisting of 14 different color photographs. Image resolution was kept relatively low (i.e., maximum 800 by 800 pixels) to ensure that the entire image would be fully displayed on the (computer) screen of all participants. The three slideshows depicted either neutral pictures (i.e., the “neutral” condition) or pictures of one of two nature types, namely “awesome nature” and “mundane nature” (see Figure 1 for sample pictures of these two nature conditions and the neutral condition)4. Using photographs of environments as experimental stimuli is highly common in environmental psychology research.

Bottom Line: However, little research has yet examined the psychological benefits of extraordinary, awe-evoking kinds of nature, such as spectacular mountain scenes or impressive waterfalls.Our analyses revealed that, compared to mundane nature and a neutral condition, watching awesome natural scenes and phenomena had some unique and pronounced emotional effects (e.g., feeling small and humble), triggered the most mood improvement, and led to a more prosocial SVO.We found that participants' willingness to donate did not differ significantly for any of the conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Marketing, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Groningen Groningen, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Environmental psychology research has demonstrated that exposure to mundane natural environments can be psychologically beneficial, and can, for instance, improve individuals' mood and concentration. However, little research has yet examined the psychological benefits of extraordinary, awe-evoking kinds of nature, such as spectacular mountain scenes or impressive waterfalls. In this study, we aimed to address the underrepresentation of such extraordinary nature in research on human-nature interactions. Specifically, we examined whether watching a picture slideshow of awesome as opposed to mundane nature differentially affected individuals' emotions, mood, social value orientation (SVO), and their willingness to donate something to others. Our analyses revealed that, compared to mundane nature and a neutral condition, watching awesome natural scenes and phenomena had some unique and pronounced emotional effects (e.g., feeling small and humble), triggered the most mood improvement, and led to a more prosocial SVO. We found that participants' willingness to donate did not differ significantly for any of the conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus