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Production and targeting of monovalent quantum dots.

Seo D, Farlow J, Southard K, Jun YW, Gartner ZJ - J Vis Exp (2014)

Bottom Line: The multivalent nature of commercial quantum dots (QDs) and the difficulties associated with producing monovalent dots have limited their applications in biology, where clustering and the spatial organization of biomolecules is often the object of study.Production of mQDs in this manner can be accomplished at small and large scale, with commercial reagents, and in minimal steps.These mQDs can be specifically directed to biological targets by hybridization to a complementary single stranded targeting DNA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology, University of California, San Francisco; Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley; Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

ABSTRACT
The multivalent nature of commercial quantum dots (QDs) and the difficulties associated with producing monovalent dots have limited their applications in biology, where clustering and the spatial organization of biomolecules is often the object of study. We describe here a protocol to produce monovalent quantum dots (mQDs) that can be accomplished in most biological research laboratories via a simple mixing of CdSe/ZnS core/shell QDs with phosphorothioate DNA (ptDNA) of defined length. After a single ptDNA strand has wrapped the QD, additional strands are excluded from the surface. Production of mQDs in this manner can be accomplished at small and large scale, with commercial reagents, and in minimal steps. These mQDs can be specifically directed to biological targets by hybridization to a complementary single stranded targeting DNA. We demonstrate the use of these mQDs as imaging probes by labeling SNAP-tagged Notch receptors on live mammalian cells, targeted by mQDs bearing a benzylguanine moiety.

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Production and targeting of monovalent quantum dots.

Seo D, Farlow J, Southard K, Jun YW, Gartner ZJ - J Vis Exp (2014)

© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4309134&req=5

Bottom Line: The multivalent nature of commercial quantum dots (QDs) and the difficulties associated with producing monovalent dots have limited their applications in biology, where clustering and the spatial organization of biomolecules is often the object of study.Production of mQDs in this manner can be accomplished at small and large scale, with commercial reagents, and in minimal steps.These mQDs can be specifically directed to biological targets by hybridization to a complementary single stranded targeting DNA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology, University of California, San Francisco; Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley; Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

ABSTRACT
The multivalent nature of commercial quantum dots (QDs) and the difficulties associated with producing monovalent dots have limited their applications in biology, where clustering and the spatial organization of biomolecules is often the object of study. We describe here a protocol to produce monovalent quantum dots (mQDs) that can be accomplished in most biological research laboratories via a simple mixing of CdSe/ZnS core/shell QDs with phosphorothioate DNA (ptDNA) of defined length. After a single ptDNA strand has wrapped the QD, additional strands are excluded from the surface. Production of mQDs in this manner can be accomplished at small and large scale, with commercial reagents, and in minimal steps. These mQDs can be specifically directed to biological targets by hybridization to a complementary single stranded targeting DNA. We demonstrate the use of these mQDs as imaging probes by labeling SNAP-tagged Notch receptors on live mammalian cells, targeted by mQDs bearing a benzylguanine moiety.

Show MeSH