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Hospital variation in survival trends for in-hospital cardiac arrest.

Girotra S, Cram P, Spertus JA, Nallamothu BK, Li Y, Jones PG, Chan PS, American Heart Association's Get With the Guidelines®‐Resuscitation Investigato - J Am Heart Assoc (2014)

Bottom Line: Improvement in survival varied markedly and ranged from 3% in the bottom hospital quartile to 11% in the top hospital quartile.Compared with minor teaching hospitals (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.06), hospital rate of survival improvement was greater at major teaching (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.10) and nonteaching hospitals (OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.09, P value for interaction=0.03).Future studies are needed to identify hospital processes that have led to the largest improvement in survival.

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Affiliation: University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (S.G.).

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Change in in‐hospital cardiac arrest survival rates from 2000–2003 to 2007–2010. The mean adjusted hospital survival rate increased from 18.1% in 2000–2003 (range 9.1% to 29.8%) to 21.4% in 2007–2010 (range 13.9% to 32.2%).
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fig03: Change in in‐hospital cardiac arrest survival rates from 2000–2003 to 2007–2010. The mean adjusted hospital survival rate increased from 18.1% in 2000–2003 (range 9.1% to 29.8%) to 21.4% in 2007–2010 (range 13.9% to 32.2%).

Mentions: After adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics, the mean relative improvement in in‐hospital cardiac arrest survival rates was 7% per year (adjusted OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.08, P<0.001; Table 3). Compared with a mean adjusted hospital survival rate of 18.1% during the 2000–2003 period, hospital survival rate increased to 21.4% in 2007–2010, which translated into a 3.3% absolute improvement in survival during this period (Figure 3). Notably, there was marked variation in annual survival improvement across sites (Figure 2B). Hospitals in the top quartile achieved a mean year‐over‐year adjusted survival increase of 11%, whereas the hospitals in the bottom quartile experienced only a mean annual improvement of survival of 3% (Table 3).


Hospital variation in survival trends for in-hospital cardiac arrest.

Girotra S, Cram P, Spertus JA, Nallamothu BK, Li Y, Jones PG, Chan PS, American Heart Association's Get With the Guidelines®‐Resuscitation Investigato - J Am Heart Assoc (2014)

Change in in‐hospital cardiac arrest survival rates from 2000–2003 to 2007–2010. The mean adjusted hospital survival rate increased from 18.1% in 2000–2003 (range 9.1% to 29.8%) to 21.4% in 2007–2010 (range 13.9% to 32.2%).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4309112&req=5

fig03: Change in in‐hospital cardiac arrest survival rates from 2000–2003 to 2007–2010. The mean adjusted hospital survival rate increased from 18.1% in 2000–2003 (range 9.1% to 29.8%) to 21.4% in 2007–2010 (range 13.9% to 32.2%).
Mentions: After adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics, the mean relative improvement in in‐hospital cardiac arrest survival rates was 7% per year (adjusted OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.08, P<0.001; Table 3). Compared with a mean adjusted hospital survival rate of 18.1% during the 2000–2003 period, hospital survival rate increased to 21.4% in 2007–2010, which translated into a 3.3% absolute improvement in survival during this period (Figure 3). Notably, there was marked variation in annual survival improvement across sites (Figure 2B). Hospitals in the top quartile achieved a mean year‐over‐year adjusted survival increase of 11%, whereas the hospitals in the bottom quartile experienced only a mean annual improvement of survival of 3% (Table 3).

Bottom Line: Improvement in survival varied markedly and ranged from 3% in the bottom hospital quartile to 11% in the top hospital quartile.Compared with minor teaching hospitals (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.06), hospital rate of survival improvement was greater at major teaching (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.10) and nonteaching hospitals (OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.09, P value for interaction=0.03).Future studies are needed to identify hospital processes that have led to the largest improvement in survival.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (S.G.).

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus