Limits...
Protective effect of a hydroethanolic extract from Bowdichia virgilioides on muscular damage and oxidative stress caused by strenuous resistance training in rats.

Dos Santos JL, Dantas RE, Lima CA, de Araújo SS, de Almeida EC, Marçal AC, Estevam Cdos S - J Int Soc Sports Nutr (2014)

Bottom Line: Treatment with B. virgilioides HEE or vehicle treatment was initiated after 25 days of RT (5 days; one dose per day).B. virgilioides HEE treatment reduced markers of oxidative stress caused by high-intensity RT.Further, HEE treatment during training significantly reduced the markers of tissue damage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Postgraduate program in Physical Education, Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE 49100-000 Brazil ; Federal University of Sergipe, Cidade Universitária Prof. José Aloísio de Campos, Department of Morphology, Av. Marechal Rondon s/n, Jardim Rosa Elze, São Cristóvão, Sergipe 49100-000 Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Natural antioxidants can reduce oxidative damage caused by high-intensity resistance training (RT). We investigated the in vitro antioxidant potential of hydroethanolic extract (HEE) from Bowdichia virgilioides on muscular damage and oxidative stress in rats subjected to high-intensity RT.

Methods: Thirty-two male Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: 1) control group (CG), oral administration (P.O.) of vehicle; 2) trained group (TG), vehicle-treated with RT; 3) B. virgilioides untrained group (BVG), treated with B. virgilioides HEE (200 mg/kg P.O.); and 4) trained B. virgilioides group (TBVG), treated with B. virgiliodes HEE (200 mg/kg P.O.). All animals were habituated to the training apparatus for 1 week. CT and TBVG animals were subjected to the training protocol, which consisted of three sets of 10 repetitions with 75% of the load established using the one-repetition maximum, for four weeks. CG and BVG animals were manipulated and fixed to the apparatus three times a week with no load. Treatment with B. virgilioides HEE or vehicle treatment was initiated after 25 days of RT (5 days; one dose per day). At the end of the experiments, plasmatic and gastrocnemius samples from all groups were obtained for the assessment of lipid peroxidation and creatine kinase activity.

Results: Compared to TG rats, TBVG rats showed decreases in plasma and gastrocnemius tissue lipid peroxidation by 55.68% (p <0.0001) and 66.61% (p <0.0012), respectively. Further, compared to TG rats TBVG rats showed decreases in plasma and gastrocnemius tissue oxidative stress by 62.83% (p <0.0005) and 54.97% (p <0.0197), respectively.

Conclusions: B. virgilioides HEE treatment reduced markers of oxidative stress caused by high-intensity RT. Further, HEE treatment during training significantly reduced the markers of tissue damage.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of HEE on plasma and muscular lipid peroxidation induced by high-intensity exercise. (A) refers to plasma samples and (B) to muscular tissue from all animal groups: trained group (TG), trained Bowdichia virgilioides group (TBVG), control group (CG), and B. virgilioides group (BVG), each consisting of eight animals. The values represent the mean ± SD. Different letters indicate significant differences between groups (p <0.05). The statistical differences were determined using one-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni post-hoc test. All experiments were performed in triplicate.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4308926&req=5

Fig5: Effect of HEE on plasma and muscular lipid peroxidation induced by high-intensity exercise. (A) refers to plasma samples and (B) to muscular tissue from all animal groups: trained group (TG), trained Bowdichia virgilioides group (TBVG), control group (CG), and B. virgilioides group (BVG), each consisting of eight animals. The values represent the mean ± SD. Different letters indicate significant differences between groups (p <0.05). The statistical differences were determined using one-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni post-hoc test. All experiments were performed in triplicate.

Mentions: To assess the effects of HEE in the body, we studied the effects of ingesting HEE in animals undergoing high-intensity RT. Oxidative stress markers were reduced in animals that ingested the B. virgilioides. As shown in Figure 5, we observed a significant reduction in plasma (55.68%, p <0.0001) and tissue (66.61%, p <0.0012) lipid peroxidation in TBVG rats as compared to TG rats. This finding indicates that B. virgilioides HEE effectively reduces oxidative stress in cellular lipid components.Figure 5


Protective effect of a hydroethanolic extract from Bowdichia virgilioides on muscular damage and oxidative stress caused by strenuous resistance training in rats.

Dos Santos JL, Dantas RE, Lima CA, de Araújo SS, de Almeida EC, Marçal AC, Estevam Cdos S - J Int Soc Sports Nutr (2014)

Effect of HEE on plasma and muscular lipid peroxidation induced by high-intensity exercise. (A) refers to plasma samples and (B) to muscular tissue from all animal groups: trained group (TG), trained Bowdichia virgilioides group (TBVG), control group (CG), and B. virgilioides group (BVG), each consisting of eight animals. The values represent the mean ± SD. Different letters indicate significant differences between groups (p <0.05). The statistical differences were determined using one-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni post-hoc test. All experiments were performed in triplicate.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4308926&req=5

Fig5: Effect of HEE on plasma and muscular lipid peroxidation induced by high-intensity exercise. (A) refers to plasma samples and (B) to muscular tissue from all animal groups: trained group (TG), trained Bowdichia virgilioides group (TBVG), control group (CG), and B. virgilioides group (BVG), each consisting of eight animals. The values represent the mean ± SD. Different letters indicate significant differences between groups (p <0.05). The statistical differences were determined using one-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni post-hoc test. All experiments were performed in triplicate.
Mentions: To assess the effects of HEE in the body, we studied the effects of ingesting HEE in animals undergoing high-intensity RT. Oxidative stress markers were reduced in animals that ingested the B. virgilioides. As shown in Figure 5, we observed a significant reduction in plasma (55.68%, p <0.0001) and tissue (66.61%, p <0.0012) lipid peroxidation in TBVG rats as compared to TG rats. This finding indicates that B. virgilioides HEE effectively reduces oxidative stress in cellular lipid components.Figure 5

Bottom Line: Treatment with B. virgilioides HEE or vehicle treatment was initiated after 25 days of RT (5 days; one dose per day).B. virgilioides HEE treatment reduced markers of oxidative stress caused by high-intensity RT.Further, HEE treatment during training significantly reduced the markers of tissue damage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Postgraduate program in Physical Education, Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE 49100-000 Brazil ; Federal University of Sergipe, Cidade Universitária Prof. José Aloísio de Campos, Department of Morphology, Av. Marechal Rondon s/n, Jardim Rosa Elze, São Cristóvão, Sergipe 49100-000 Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Natural antioxidants can reduce oxidative damage caused by high-intensity resistance training (RT). We investigated the in vitro antioxidant potential of hydroethanolic extract (HEE) from Bowdichia virgilioides on muscular damage and oxidative stress in rats subjected to high-intensity RT.

Methods: Thirty-two male Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: 1) control group (CG), oral administration (P.O.) of vehicle; 2) trained group (TG), vehicle-treated with RT; 3) B. virgilioides untrained group (BVG), treated with B. virgilioides HEE (200 mg/kg P.O.); and 4) trained B. virgilioides group (TBVG), treated with B. virgiliodes HEE (200 mg/kg P.O.). All animals were habituated to the training apparatus for 1 week. CT and TBVG animals were subjected to the training protocol, which consisted of three sets of 10 repetitions with 75% of the load established using the one-repetition maximum, for four weeks. CG and BVG animals were manipulated and fixed to the apparatus three times a week with no load. Treatment with B. virgilioides HEE or vehicle treatment was initiated after 25 days of RT (5 days; one dose per day). At the end of the experiments, plasmatic and gastrocnemius samples from all groups were obtained for the assessment of lipid peroxidation and creatine kinase activity.

Results: Compared to TG rats, TBVG rats showed decreases in plasma and gastrocnemius tissue lipid peroxidation by 55.68% (p <0.0001) and 66.61% (p <0.0012), respectively. Further, compared to TG rats TBVG rats showed decreases in plasma and gastrocnemius tissue oxidative stress by 62.83% (p <0.0005) and 54.97% (p <0.0197), respectively.

Conclusions: B. virgilioides HEE treatment reduced markers of oxidative stress caused by high-intensity RT. Further, HEE treatment during training significantly reduced the markers of tissue damage.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus