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Cellulosic ethanol production by natural bacterial consortia is enhanced by Pseudoxanthomonas taiwanensis.

Du R, Yan J, Li S, Zhang L, Zhang S, Li J, Zhao G, Qi P - Biotechnol Biofuels (2015)

Bottom Line: In the present study, we analyzed 16 different natural bacterial consortia from a variety of habitats in China and found that the HP consortium exhibited relatively high ethanol production (2.06 g/L ethanol titer from 7 g/L α-cellulose at 55°C in 6 days).The ethanol conversion ratio reached 78%, with ethanol titers up to 2.5 g/L.In the present study, we found a natural bacterial consortium with outstanding ethanol production performance, and revealed an efficient method with potentially broad applicability for further improving the ethanol production of natural bacterial consortia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of New Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 China ; Beijing Engineering Research Center for Biofuels, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Natural bacterial consortia are considered a promising solution for one-step production of ethanol from lignocellulose because of their adaptation to a wide range of natural lignocellulosic substrates and their capacity for efficient cellulose degradation. However, their low ethanol conversion efficiency has greatly limited the development and application of natural bacterial consortia.

Results: In the present study, we analyzed 16 different natural bacterial consortia from a variety of habitats in China and found that the HP consortium exhibited relatively high ethanol production (2.06 g/L ethanol titer from 7 g/L α-cellulose at 55°C in 6 days). Further studies showed that Pseudoxanthomonas taiwanensis played an important role in the high ethanol productivity of HP and that this strain effectively boosted the ethanol production of various other natural bacterial consortia. Finally, we developed a new consortium, termed HPP, by optimizing the proportion of P. taiwanensis in the HP consortium to achieve the highest ethanol production reported for natural consortia. The ethanol conversion ratio reached 78%, with ethanol titers up to 2.5 g/L.

Conclusions: In the present study, we found a natural bacterial consortium with outstanding ethanol production performance, and revealed an efficient method with potentially broad applicability for further improving the ethanol production of natural bacterial consortia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

P. taiwanensisincreases ethanol production by various consortia. (A) IS, SW, and SS differed significantly in their community structure, as shown by PCR-DGGE analysis. (B) Principal component analysis (PCA) of the PCR-DGGE data in A. PC1 and PC2 explained 57.0% and 43.0% of the total variance, respectively. (C) Enhancing the ethanol production of consortia using P. taiwanensis. Fermentation was conducted at 55°C for 7 days with the original consortia as controls. Samples were collected each day to measure ethanol titers, and the highest titers are shown. The error bars represent the SD (n = 3).
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Fig3: P. taiwanensisincreases ethanol production by various consortia. (A) IS, SW, and SS differed significantly in their community structure, as shown by PCR-DGGE analysis. (B) Principal component analysis (PCA) of the PCR-DGGE data in A. PC1 and PC2 explained 57.0% and 43.0% of the total variance, respectively. (C) Enhancing the ethanol production of consortia using P. taiwanensis. Fermentation was conducted at 55°C for 7 days with the original consortia as controls. Samples were collected each day to measure ethanol titers, and the highest titers are shown. The error bars represent the SD (n = 3).

Mentions: To investigate whether co-fermentation with P. taiwanensis would boost the ethanol productivity of various other native consortia, we selected three other consortia from widely differing habitats, including IS isolate from steppe soils in Inner Mongolia, SW isolated from wheat straw in Shandong province, China, and SS isolated from sorghum stalks in Shandong province, China. The PCR-DGGE and PCA analyses shown in Figure 3A and B confirmed that the three consortia were significantly different in their bacterial community structures. These consortia were each co-fermented with P. taiwanensis at a biomass proportion of 8.5:1. After co-fermentation in anaerobic bottles at 55°C, the ethanol titers were evaluated; addition of P. taiwanensis promoted the ethanol productivity of all consortia. Compared to the controls, ethanol production was increased by 28.5% for IS, 44.8% for SW, and 29.3% for SS (Figure 3C). These results suggest that co-fermentation with P. taiwanensis is an effective method with potentially broad applicability for increasing the cellulosic ethanol production of native consortia.Figure 3


Cellulosic ethanol production by natural bacterial consortia is enhanced by Pseudoxanthomonas taiwanensis.

Du R, Yan J, Li S, Zhang L, Zhang S, Li J, Zhao G, Qi P - Biotechnol Biofuels (2015)

P. taiwanensisincreases ethanol production by various consortia. (A) IS, SW, and SS differed significantly in their community structure, as shown by PCR-DGGE analysis. (B) Principal component analysis (PCA) of the PCR-DGGE data in A. PC1 and PC2 explained 57.0% and 43.0% of the total variance, respectively. (C) Enhancing the ethanol production of consortia using P. taiwanensis. Fermentation was conducted at 55°C for 7 days with the original consortia as controls. Samples were collected each day to measure ethanol titers, and the highest titers are shown. The error bars represent the SD (n = 3).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4308921&req=5

Fig3: P. taiwanensisincreases ethanol production by various consortia. (A) IS, SW, and SS differed significantly in their community structure, as shown by PCR-DGGE analysis. (B) Principal component analysis (PCA) of the PCR-DGGE data in A. PC1 and PC2 explained 57.0% and 43.0% of the total variance, respectively. (C) Enhancing the ethanol production of consortia using P. taiwanensis. Fermentation was conducted at 55°C for 7 days with the original consortia as controls. Samples were collected each day to measure ethanol titers, and the highest titers are shown. The error bars represent the SD (n = 3).
Mentions: To investigate whether co-fermentation with P. taiwanensis would boost the ethanol productivity of various other native consortia, we selected three other consortia from widely differing habitats, including IS isolate from steppe soils in Inner Mongolia, SW isolated from wheat straw in Shandong province, China, and SS isolated from sorghum stalks in Shandong province, China. The PCR-DGGE and PCA analyses shown in Figure 3A and B confirmed that the three consortia were significantly different in their bacterial community structures. These consortia were each co-fermented with P. taiwanensis at a biomass proportion of 8.5:1. After co-fermentation in anaerobic bottles at 55°C, the ethanol titers were evaluated; addition of P. taiwanensis promoted the ethanol productivity of all consortia. Compared to the controls, ethanol production was increased by 28.5% for IS, 44.8% for SW, and 29.3% for SS (Figure 3C). These results suggest that co-fermentation with P. taiwanensis is an effective method with potentially broad applicability for increasing the cellulosic ethanol production of native consortia.Figure 3

Bottom Line: In the present study, we analyzed 16 different natural bacterial consortia from a variety of habitats in China and found that the HP consortium exhibited relatively high ethanol production (2.06 g/L ethanol titer from 7 g/L α-cellulose at 55°C in 6 days).The ethanol conversion ratio reached 78%, with ethanol titers up to 2.5 g/L.In the present study, we found a natural bacterial consortium with outstanding ethanol production performance, and revealed an efficient method with potentially broad applicability for further improving the ethanol production of natural bacterial consortia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of New Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 China ; Beijing Engineering Research Center for Biofuels, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Natural bacterial consortia are considered a promising solution for one-step production of ethanol from lignocellulose because of their adaptation to a wide range of natural lignocellulosic substrates and their capacity for efficient cellulose degradation. However, their low ethanol conversion efficiency has greatly limited the development and application of natural bacterial consortia.

Results: In the present study, we analyzed 16 different natural bacterial consortia from a variety of habitats in China and found that the HP consortium exhibited relatively high ethanol production (2.06 g/L ethanol titer from 7 g/L α-cellulose at 55°C in 6 days). Further studies showed that Pseudoxanthomonas taiwanensis played an important role in the high ethanol productivity of HP and that this strain effectively boosted the ethanol production of various other natural bacterial consortia. Finally, we developed a new consortium, termed HPP, by optimizing the proportion of P. taiwanensis in the HP consortium to achieve the highest ethanol production reported for natural consortia. The ethanol conversion ratio reached 78%, with ethanol titers up to 2.5 g/L.

Conclusions: In the present study, we found a natural bacterial consortium with outstanding ethanol production performance, and revealed an efficient method with potentially broad applicability for further improving the ethanol production of natural bacterial consortia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus