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Workplace violence against homecare workers and its relationship with workers health outcomes: a cross-sectional study.

Hanson GC, Perrin NA, Moss H, Laharnar N, Glass N - BMC Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Exposure was associated with greater stress (p < .001), depression (p < .001), sleep problems (p < .001), and burnout (p < .001).Confidence in addressing workplace aggression buffered homecare workers against negative work and health outcomes.To ensure homecare worker safety and positive health outcomes in the provision of services, it is critical to develop and implement preventive safety training programs with policies and procedures that support homecare workers who experience harassment and violence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Data and Analysis Center, Center for Health Research, Portland, Oregon, USA. ginger.c.hanson@kpchr.org.

ABSTRACT

Background: Consumer-driven homecare models support aging and disabled individuals to live independently through the services of homecare workers. Although these models have benefits, including autonomy and control over services, little evidence exists about challenges homecare workers may face when providing services, including workplace violence and the negative outcomes associated with workplace violence. This study investigates the prevalence of workplace violence among homecare workers and examines the relationship between these experiences and homecare worker stress, burnout, depression, and sleep.

Methods: We recruited female homecare workers in Oregon, the first US state to implement a consumer driven homecare model, to complete an on-line or telephone survey with peer interviewers. The survey asked about demographics and included measures to assess workplace violence, fear, stress, burnout, depression and sleep problems.

Results: Homecare workers (n = 1,214) reported past-year incidents of verbal aggression (50.3% of respondents), workplace aggression (26.9%), workplace violence (23.6%), sexual harassment (25.7%), and sexual aggression (12.8%). Exposure was associated with greater stress (p < .001), depression (p < .001), sleep problems (p < .001), and burnout (p < .001). Confidence in addressing workplace aggression buffered homecare workers against negative work and health outcomes.

Conclusions: To ensure homecare worker safety and positive health outcomes in the provision of services, it is critical to develop and implement preventive safety training programs with policies and procedures that support homecare workers who experience harassment and violence.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Theoretical model of the relationships between forms of workplace aggression work and health outcomes.
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Fig1: Theoretical model of the relationships between forms of workplace aggression work and health outcomes.

Mentions: This study examines sexual harassment and workplace violence prevalence in a consumer-driven homecare model, where the potential outcomes for homecare workers who experience harassment and/or violence are not fully understood. We examined the prevalence of different types of workplace violence and sexual harassment as defined above, and the association of workplace violence, sexual harassment, and fear of violence or harassment on homecare worker’s work and health outcomes. Prevalence estimates are critical to supporting efforts of homecare workers and their advocates, such as labor unions, to develop training programs and policies to prevent sexual harassment and workplace violence. We also examined workers’ confidence in preventing and responding to sexual harassment and workplace violence as a moderator of the relationship between these experiences and negative work (e.g. burnout) and health (e.g. depression) outcomes, see Figure 1. This information is also important to developing homecare worker programs to reduce the negative outcomes often associated with experiencing harassment and violence.Figure 1


Workplace violence against homecare workers and its relationship with workers health outcomes: a cross-sectional study.

Hanson GC, Perrin NA, Moss H, Laharnar N, Glass N - BMC Public Health (2015)

Theoretical model of the relationships between forms of workplace aggression work and health outcomes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4308913&req=5

Fig1: Theoretical model of the relationships between forms of workplace aggression work and health outcomes.
Mentions: This study examines sexual harassment and workplace violence prevalence in a consumer-driven homecare model, where the potential outcomes for homecare workers who experience harassment and/or violence are not fully understood. We examined the prevalence of different types of workplace violence and sexual harassment as defined above, and the association of workplace violence, sexual harassment, and fear of violence or harassment on homecare worker’s work and health outcomes. Prevalence estimates are critical to supporting efforts of homecare workers and their advocates, such as labor unions, to develop training programs and policies to prevent sexual harassment and workplace violence. We also examined workers’ confidence in preventing and responding to sexual harassment and workplace violence as a moderator of the relationship between these experiences and negative work (e.g. burnout) and health (e.g. depression) outcomes, see Figure 1. This information is also important to developing homecare worker programs to reduce the negative outcomes often associated with experiencing harassment and violence.Figure 1

Bottom Line: Exposure was associated with greater stress (p < .001), depression (p < .001), sleep problems (p < .001), and burnout (p < .001).Confidence in addressing workplace aggression buffered homecare workers against negative work and health outcomes.To ensure homecare worker safety and positive health outcomes in the provision of services, it is critical to develop and implement preventive safety training programs with policies and procedures that support homecare workers who experience harassment and violence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Data and Analysis Center, Center for Health Research, Portland, Oregon, USA. ginger.c.hanson@kpchr.org.

ABSTRACT

Background: Consumer-driven homecare models support aging and disabled individuals to live independently through the services of homecare workers. Although these models have benefits, including autonomy and control over services, little evidence exists about challenges homecare workers may face when providing services, including workplace violence and the negative outcomes associated with workplace violence. This study investigates the prevalence of workplace violence among homecare workers and examines the relationship between these experiences and homecare worker stress, burnout, depression, and sleep.

Methods: We recruited female homecare workers in Oregon, the first US state to implement a consumer driven homecare model, to complete an on-line or telephone survey with peer interviewers. The survey asked about demographics and included measures to assess workplace violence, fear, stress, burnout, depression and sleep problems.

Results: Homecare workers (n = 1,214) reported past-year incidents of verbal aggression (50.3% of respondents), workplace aggression (26.9%), workplace violence (23.6%), sexual harassment (25.7%), and sexual aggression (12.8%). Exposure was associated with greater stress (p < .001), depression (p < .001), sleep problems (p < .001), and burnout (p < .001). Confidence in addressing workplace aggression buffered homecare workers against negative work and health outcomes.

Conclusions: To ensure homecare worker safety and positive health outcomes in the provision of services, it is critical to develop and implement preventive safety training programs with policies and procedures that support homecare workers who experience harassment and violence.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus