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The association between social position and self-rated health in 10 deprived neighbourhoods.

Bak CK, Andersen PT, Dokkedal U - BMC Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Of the net sample of 7,293 individuals, 1,464 refused to participate, 885 were not at home, and 373 did not participate for other reasons, resulting in an average response rate of 62.7%.The analysis shows that the number of life resources is significantly associated with having poor/very poor self-rated health for both genders.The results show a strong association between residents' number of life resources and their self-rated health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Science and Technology, Unit of Epidemiology and Public Health, Niels Jernes Vej 14, 9220, Aalborg, Denmark. ckb@hst.aau.dk.

ABSTRACT

Background: A number of studies have shown that poor self-rated health is more prevalent among people in poor, socially disadvantaged positions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between self-rated health and social position in 10 deprived neighbourhoods.

Methods: A stratified random sample of 7,934 households was selected. Of these, 641 were excluded from the study because the residents had moved, died, or were otherwise unavailable. Of the net sample of 7,293 individuals, 1,464 refused to participate, 885 were not at home, and 373 did not participate for other reasons, resulting in an average response rate of 62.7%. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate the associations between the number of life resources and the odds of self-rated health and also between the type of neighbourhood and the odds of self-rated health.

Results: The analysis shows that the number of life resources is significantly associated with having poor/very poor self-rated health for both genders. The results clearly suggest that the more life resources that an individual has, the lower the risk is of that individual reporting poor/very poor health.

Conclusions: The results show a strong association between residents' number of life resources and their self-rated health. In particular, residents in deprived rural neighbourhoods have much better self-rated health than do residents in deprived urban neighbourhoods, but further studies are needed to explain these urban/rural differences and to determine how they influence health.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Sampling scheme and participation in the study. FigureĀ 1 illustrates the sampling of participants in the study. The target group was defined as individuals above the age of 17 living in the neighbourhoods. For the current study, a stratified random sample of 7,934 households was selected. Of the 7,934 households, 641 were excluded from the study, as the residents had moved, died, or were otherwise unavailable. One person from each of the remaining households was selected, and quota sampling with respect to gender and age was used as the sampling procedure. Of the net sample of 7,293 individuals, 1,464 refused to participate, 885 were not at home, and 373 did not participate for other reasons, resulting in an average response rate of 62.7%.
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Fig1: Sampling scheme and participation in the study. FigureĀ 1 illustrates the sampling of participants in the study. The target group was defined as individuals above the age of 17 living in the neighbourhoods. For the current study, a stratified random sample of 7,934 households was selected. Of the 7,934 households, 641 were excluded from the study, as the residents had moved, died, or were otherwise unavailable. One person from each of the remaining households was selected, and quota sampling with respect to gender and age was used as the sampling procedure. Of the net sample of 7,293 individuals, 1,464 refused to participate, 885 were not at home, and 373 did not participate for other reasons, resulting in an average response rate of 62.7%.

Mentions: The target group was defined as individuals older than age 17 living in the studied neighbourhoods. For the present study, a stratified random sample of 7,934 households was selected (FigureĀ 1). Of the 7,934 households, 641 were excluded from the study, as the residents had moved, died, or were otherwise unavailable. One person from each of the remaining households was selected, and a quota sampling procedure with respect to gender and age was used. Of the 7,293 remaining individuals, 1,464 refused to participate, 885 were not at home, and 373 did not participate for other reasons (we do not have specific information about the reasons), resulting in an average response rate of 62.7%.Figure 1


The association between social position and self-rated health in 10 deprived neighbourhoods.

Bak CK, Andersen PT, Dokkedal U - BMC Public Health (2015)

Sampling scheme and participation in the study. FigureĀ 1 illustrates the sampling of participants in the study. The target group was defined as individuals above the age of 17 living in the neighbourhoods. For the current study, a stratified random sample of 7,934 households was selected. Of the 7,934 households, 641 were excluded from the study, as the residents had moved, died, or were otherwise unavailable. One person from each of the remaining households was selected, and quota sampling with respect to gender and age was used as the sampling procedure. Of the net sample of 7,293 individuals, 1,464 refused to participate, 885 were not at home, and 373 did not participate for other reasons, resulting in an average response rate of 62.7%.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4308888&req=5

Fig1: Sampling scheme and participation in the study. FigureĀ 1 illustrates the sampling of participants in the study. The target group was defined as individuals above the age of 17 living in the neighbourhoods. For the current study, a stratified random sample of 7,934 households was selected. Of the 7,934 households, 641 were excluded from the study, as the residents had moved, died, or were otherwise unavailable. One person from each of the remaining households was selected, and quota sampling with respect to gender and age was used as the sampling procedure. Of the net sample of 7,293 individuals, 1,464 refused to participate, 885 were not at home, and 373 did not participate for other reasons, resulting in an average response rate of 62.7%.
Mentions: The target group was defined as individuals older than age 17 living in the studied neighbourhoods. For the present study, a stratified random sample of 7,934 households was selected (FigureĀ 1). Of the 7,934 households, 641 were excluded from the study, as the residents had moved, died, or were otherwise unavailable. One person from each of the remaining households was selected, and a quota sampling procedure with respect to gender and age was used. Of the 7,293 remaining individuals, 1,464 refused to participate, 885 were not at home, and 373 did not participate for other reasons (we do not have specific information about the reasons), resulting in an average response rate of 62.7%.Figure 1

Bottom Line: Of the net sample of 7,293 individuals, 1,464 refused to participate, 885 were not at home, and 373 did not participate for other reasons, resulting in an average response rate of 62.7%.The analysis shows that the number of life resources is significantly associated with having poor/very poor self-rated health for both genders.The results show a strong association between residents' number of life resources and their self-rated health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Science and Technology, Unit of Epidemiology and Public Health, Niels Jernes Vej 14, 9220, Aalborg, Denmark. ckb@hst.aau.dk.

ABSTRACT

Background: A number of studies have shown that poor self-rated health is more prevalent among people in poor, socially disadvantaged positions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between self-rated health and social position in 10 deprived neighbourhoods.

Methods: A stratified random sample of 7,934 households was selected. Of these, 641 were excluded from the study because the residents had moved, died, or were otherwise unavailable. Of the net sample of 7,293 individuals, 1,464 refused to participate, 885 were not at home, and 373 did not participate for other reasons, resulting in an average response rate of 62.7%. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate the associations between the number of life resources and the odds of self-rated health and also between the type of neighbourhood and the odds of self-rated health.

Results: The analysis shows that the number of life resources is significantly associated with having poor/very poor self-rated health for both genders. The results clearly suggest that the more life resources that an individual has, the lower the risk is of that individual reporting poor/very poor health.

Conclusions: The results show a strong association between residents' number of life resources and their self-rated health. In particular, residents in deprived rural neighbourhoods have much better self-rated health than do residents in deprived urban neighbourhoods, but further studies are needed to explain these urban/rural differences and to determine how they influence health.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus