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Impulse magnetic stimulation facilitates synaptic regeneration in rats following sciatic nerve injury.

Zhivolupov SA, Odinak MM, Rashidov NA, Onischenko LS, Samartsev IN, Jurin AA - Neural Regen Res (2012)

Bottom Line: To evaluate the effects of impulse magnetic stimulation of the spinal cord on peripheral nerve regneration, we compressed a 3 mm segment located in the middle third of the hip using a sterilized artery forceps to induce ischemia.Electron microscopy results showed that in and below the injuryed segment, the inflammation and demyelination of neural tissue were alleviated, apoptotic cells were reduced, and injured Schwann cells and myelin fibers were repaired.These findings suggest that high-frequency impulse magnetic stimulation of spinal cord and corresponding spinal nerve roots promotes synaptic regeneration following sciatic nerve injury.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Military-Medical Academy, Saint-Petersburg, 194044, Lesnoy prospect 2, Russian Federation.

ABSTRACT
The current studies describing magnetic stimulation for treatment of nervous system diseases mainly focus on transcranial magnetic stimulation and rarely focus on spinal cord magnetic stimulation. Spinal cord magnetic stimulation has been confirmed to promote neural plasticity after injuries of spinal cord, brain and peripheral nerve. To evaluate the effects of impulse magnetic stimulation of the spinal cord on peripheral nerve regneration, we compressed a 3 mm segment located in the middle third of the hip using a sterilized artery forceps to induce ischemia. Then, all animals underwent impulse magnetic stimulation of the lumbar portion of spinal crod and spinal nerve roots daily for 1 month. Electron microscopy results showed that in and below the injuryed segment, the inflammation and demyelination of neural tissue were alleviated, apoptotic cells were reduced, and injured Schwann cells and myelin fibers were repaired. These findings suggest that high-frequency impulse magnetic stimulation of spinal cord and corresponding spinal nerve roots promotes synaptic regeneration following sciatic nerve injury.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Ultramicroscopic observation of sciatic nerve stained according to the methods of Van Gizon and Mallory at 1 month after sciatic nerve injury and impulse magnetic stimulation treatment (electron transmission microscopy; × 16 000). SC: Schwann cell; ÌF: myelin fiber; A: axon.
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Figure 3: Ultramicroscopic observation of sciatic nerve stained according to the methods of Van Gizon and Mallory at 1 month after sciatic nerve injury and impulse magnetic stimulation treatment (electron transmission microscopy; × 16 000). SC: Schwann cell; ÌF: myelin fiber; A: axon.

Mentions: In 1 month after the beginning of IMS treatment, the epineurium had a typical structure, whereas SC were poorly differentiated and had incomplete set of organelles. The epineurium was transparent and MFs were settled porously; the number of collagen fibers surrounding them was reduced. The MFs had moderately swollen myelin shell and axons with typical structure. The nodes of Ranvier were a bit modified (increased transparency of Schmidt-Lanterman clefts). Sections with exfoliated lamellas were observed in some MFs. The SCs had nuclei with normal sarcoplasm density, uniformly distributed chromatin and large compact nucleoli. The cytoplasm of SCs contained a large number of polysomes and tubules of granular endoplasmic reticulum representing intracellular reparation (Figure 3).


Impulse magnetic stimulation facilitates synaptic regeneration in rats following sciatic nerve injury.

Zhivolupov SA, Odinak MM, Rashidov NA, Onischenko LS, Samartsev IN, Jurin AA - Neural Regen Res (2012)

Ultramicroscopic observation of sciatic nerve stained according to the methods of Van Gizon and Mallory at 1 month after sciatic nerve injury and impulse magnetic stimulation treatment (electron transmission microscopy; × 16 000). SC: Schwann cell; ÌF: myelin fiber; A: axon.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4308799&req=5

Figure 3: Ultramicroscopic observation of sciatic nerve stained according to the methods of Van Gizon and Mallory at 1 month after sciatic nerve injury and impulse magnetic stimulation treatment (electron transmission microscopy; × 16 000). SC: Schwann cell; ÌF: myelin fiber; A: axon.
Mentions: In 1 month after the beginning of IMS treatment, the epineurium had a typical structure, whereas SC were poorly differentiated and had incomplete set of organelles. The epineurium was transparent and MFs were settled porously; the number of collagen fibers surrounding them was reduced. The MFs had moderately swollen myelin shell and axons with typical structure. The nodes of Ranvier were a bit modified (increased transparency of Schmidt-Lanterman clefts). Sections with exfoliated lamellas were observed in some MFs. The SCs had nuclei with normal sarcoplasm density, uniformly distributed chromatin and large compact nucleoli. The cytoplasm of SCs contained a large number of polysomes and tubules of granular endoplasmic reticulum representing intracellular reparation (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: To evaluate the effects of impulse magnetic stimulation of the spinal cord on peripheral nerve regneration, we compressed a 3 mm segment located in the middle third of the hip using a sterilized artery forceps to induce ischemia.Electron microscopy results showed that in and below the injuryed segment, the inflammation and demyelination of neural tissue were alleviated, apoptotic cells were reduced, and injured Schwann cells and myelin fibers were repaired.These findings suggest that high-frequency impulse magnetic stimulation of spinal cord and corresponding spinal nerve roots promotes synaptic regeneration following sciatic nerve injury.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Military-Medical Academy, Saint-Petersburg, 194044, Lesnoy prospect 2, Russian Federation.

ABSTRACT
The current studies describing magnetic stimulation for treatment of nervous system diseases mainly focus on transcranial magnetic stimulation and rarely focus on spinal cord magnetic stimulation. Spinal cord magnetic stimulation has been confirmed to promote neural plasticity after injuries of spinal cord, brain and peripheral nerve. To evaluate the effects of impulse magnetic stimulation of the spinal cord on peripheral nerve regneration, we compressed a 3 mm segment located in the middle third of the hip using a sterilized artery forceps to induce ischemia. Then, all animals underwent impulse magnetic stimulation of the lumbar portion of spinal crod and spinal nerve roots daily for 1 month. Electron microscopy results showed that in and below the injuryed segment, the inflammation and demyelination of neural tissue were alleviated, apoptotic cells were reduced, and injured Schwann cells and myelin fibers were repaired. These findings suggest that high-frequency impulse magnetic stimulation of spinal cord and corresponding spinal nerve roots promotes synaptic regeneration following sciatic nerve injury.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus