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Glial scar size, inhibitor concentration, and growth of regenerating axons after spinal cord transection.

Zhu W, Sun Y, Chen X, Feng S - Neural Regen Res (2012)

Bottom Line: A mathematical model has been formulated in accordance with cell chemotaxis and relevant experimental data.The present study observed the effects of glial scar size and inhibitor concentration on regenerative axonal growth following spinal cord transection.When the average ratio was < 1.5, regenerating axons were able to grow and successfully contact target cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shanghai Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072, China.

ABSTRACT
A mathematical model has been formulated in accordance with cell chemotaxis and relevant experimental data. A three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann method was used for numerical simulation. The present study observed the effects of glial scar size and inhibitor concentration on regenerative axonal growth following spinal cord transection. The simulation test comprised two parts: (1) when release rates of growth inhibitor and promoter were constant, the effects of glial scar size on axonal growth rate were analyzed, and concentrations of inhibitor and promoters located at the moving growth cones were recorded. (2) When the glial scar size was constant, the effects of inhibitor and promoter release rates on axonal growth rate were analyzed, and inhibitor and promoter concentrations at the moving growth cones were recorded. Results demonstrated that (1) a larger glial scar and a higher release rate of inhibitor resulted in a reduced axonal growth rate. (2) The axonal growth rate depended on the ratio of inhibitor to promoter concentrations at the growth cones. When the average ratio was < 1.5, regenerating axons were able to grow and successfully contact target cells.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The relationship curve of mean growth velocity (Y-axis) to inhibitor release ratio (η2, X-axis) and glial scar diameter ratio (β) in an axon tract of Figure 2.Axonal growth velocity decreases with increased inhibitor release ratio η2. If the inhibitor release ratio η2 is identical, axon growth velocity is low when the glial scar diameter ratio (β) is large.
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Figure 6: The relationship curve of mean growth velocity (Y-axis) to inhibitor release ratio (η2, X-axis) and glial scar diameter ratio (β) in an axon tract of Figure 2.Axonal growth velocity decreases with increased inhibitor release ratio η2. If the inhibitor release ratio η2 is identical, axon growth velocity is low when the glial scar diameter ratio (β) is large.

Mentions: Figure 6 shows the relationship curve of mean growth velocity to the inhibitor release ratio (η2) and glial scar diameter ratio (β) in an axon tract of the image from Figure 2.


Glial scar size, inhibitor concentration, and growth of regenerating axons after spinal cord transection.

Zhu W, Sun Y, Chen X, Feng S - Neural Regen Res (2012)

The relationship curve of mean growth velocity (Y-axis) to inhibitor release ratio (η2, X-axis) and glial scar diameter ratio (β) in an axon tract of Figure 2.Axonal growth velocity decreases with increased inhibitor release ratio η2. If the inhibitor release ratio η2 is identical, axon growth velocity is low when the glial scar diameter ratio (β) is large.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4308747&req=5

Figure 6: The relationship curve of mean growth velocity (Y-axis) to inhibitor release ratio (η2, X-axis) and glial scar diameter ratio (β) in an axon tract of Figure 2.Axonal growth velocity decreases with increased inhibitor release ratio η2. If the inhibitor release ratio η2 is identical, axon growth velocity is low when the glial scar diameter ratio (β) is large.
Mentions: Figure 6 shows the relationship curve of mean growth velocity to the inhibitor release ratio (η2) and glial scar diameter ratio (β) in an axon tract of the image from Figure 2.

Bottom Line: A mathematical model has been formulated in accordance with cell chemotaxis and relevant experimental data.The present study observed the effects of glial scar size and inhibitor concentration on regenerative axonal growth following spinal cord transection.When the average ratio was < 1.5, regenerating axons were able to grow and successfully contact target cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shanghai Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072, China.

ABSTRACT
A mathematical model has been formulated in accordance with cell chemotaxis and relevant experimental data. A three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann method was used for numerical simulation. The present study observed the effects of glial scar size and inhibitor concentration on regenerative axonal growth following spinal cord transection. The simulation test comprised two parts: (1) when release rates of growth inhibitor and promoter were constant, the effects of glial scar size on axonal growth rate were analyzed, and concentrations of inhibitor and promoters located at the moving growth cones were recorded. (2) When the glial scar size was constant, the effects of inhibitor and promoter release rates on axonal growth rate were analyzed, and inhibitor and promoter concentrations at the moving growth cones were recorded. Results demonstrated that (1) a larger glial scar and a higher release rate of inhibitor resulted in a reduced axonal growth rate. (2) The axonal growth rate depended on the ratio of inhibitor to promoter concentrations at the growth cones. When the average ratio was < 1.5, regenerating axons were able to grow and successfully contact target cells.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus