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Proteomic analysis shows that stress response proteins are significantly up-regulated in resistant diploid wheat (Triticum monococcum) in response to attack by the grain aphid (Sitobion avenae).

Guan W, Ferry N, Edwards MG, Bell HA, Othman H, Gatehouse JA, Gatehouse AM - Mol. Breed. (2015)

Bottom Line: The present study was carried out to investigate the potential of a diploid wheat line (ACC20 PGR1755), reported as exhibiting resistance to S. avenae, to serve as a source of resistance genes.Proteomic analysis showed that approximately 200 protein spots were reproducibly detected in leaf extracts from both the resistant line and a comparable susceptible line (ACC5 PGR1735) using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and image comparison software.However, in the resistant line only, several stress response proteins (including NBS-LRR-like proteins) and oxidative stress response proteins were identified as up-regulated in response to aphid feeding, as well as proteins involved in DNA synthesis/replication/repair.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Newcastle Institute for Research on Sustainability, School of Biology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU UK.

ABSTRACT

The grain aphid Sitobion avenae (F.) is a major pest of wheat, acting as a virus vector as well as causing direct plant damage. Commonly grown wheat varieties in the UK have only limited resistance to this pest. The present study was carried out to investigate the potential of a diploid wheat line (ACC20 PGR1755), reported as exhibiting resistance to S. avenae, to serve as a source of resistance genes. The diploid wheat line was confirmed as partially resistant, substantially reducing the fecundity, longevity and growth rate of the aphid. Proteomic analysis showed that approximately 200 protein spots were reproducibly detected in leaf extracts from both the resistant line and a comparable susceptible line (ACC5 PGR1735) using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and image comparison software. Twenty-four spots were significantly up-regulated (>2-fold) in the resistant line after 24 h of aphid feeding (13 and 11 involved in local and systemic responses, respectively). Approximately 50 % of all differentially expressed protein spots were identified by a combination of database searching with MS and MS/MS data, revealing that the majority of proteins up-regulated by aphid infestation were involved in metabolic processes (including photosynthesis) and transcriptional regulation. However, in the resistant line only, several stress response proteins (including NBS-LRR-like proteins) and oxidative stress response proteins were identified as up-regulated in response to aphid feeding, as well as proteins involved in DNA synthesis/replication/repair. This study indicates that the resistant diploid line ACC20 PGR1755 may provide a valuable resource in breeding wheat for resistance to aphids.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Changes in diploid wheat leaf proteins following aphid infestation for 24 h (a) or for 8 days (b). Proteins identified were assigned to categories based on biological process GO terms, shown as number of total response in each category for each treatment. Proteins that could not be identified were not included. First character: R resistant line, S susceptible line. Second character: L local tissues, S systemic tissues
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Fig2: Changes in diploid wheat leaf proteins following aphid infestation for 24 h (a) or for 8 days (b). Proteins identified were assigned to categories based on biological process GO terms, shown as number of total response in each category for each treatment. Proteins that could not be identified were not included. First character: R resistant line, S susceptible line. Second character: L local tissues, S systemic tissues

Mentions: Identified up-regulated protein spots listed in Tables 1 and 2 are grouped by functional categories in Fig. 2a, b. The results clearly show that the majority of identified proteins that were differentially regulated in both the resistant (ACC20 PGR1755) and susceptible (ACC5 PGR1735) diploid line following aphid infestation were involved in photosynthesis or other metabolic processes or were classified as being uncharacterised/unknown. Other proteins identified in both lines were shown to be involved in: ATP synthesis, proteolysis, post-translational modification, immune response, nuclear mRNA splicing, mRNA and miRNA processing, chromosome organisation, cell division and cytokinesis (Tables 1, 2). However, there were notable differences in the response of these two lines, particularly in respect of the up-regulation of general and specific stress response proteins. Importantly, these results show that proteins known to be involved in the stress response and the defence response were clearly induced in the resistant line, but not the susceptible line, in response to aphid infestation (Fig. 3a, b) and that different proteins were up-regulated at different time points. Thus, both spatial and temporal effects were observed. For example, at 24 h (representing an early response), a heat stress TF and dehydrin were up-regulated as part of the local response, whereas NBS–LRR type resistant protein was up-regulated as part of the systemic response. At 8 days (late response), a different set of proteins (two putative stress-induced protein sti1, putative viral resistance protein, MEDsa GLB1 and HSP20-like chaperone) was up-regulated as part of the local response, whilst a NBS-containing resistance-like protein was up-regulated as part of the systemic response. Additionally, at 24 h post-infestation, transcription factors and proteins with roles in signalling were shown to be clearly induced in the resistant line; by day 8, proteins involved in protein synthesis were shown to be up-regulated in this line. Interestingly, DNA repair proteins were also up-regulated in the resistant line. These results also show that the majority of the up-regulated proteins (in terms of number) were induced locally rather than systemically (Fig. 2a, b).Fig. 2


Proteomic analysis shows that stress response proteins are significantly up-regulated in resistant diploid wheat (Triticum monococcum) in response to attack by the grain aphid (Sitobion avenae).

Guan W, Ferry N, Edwards MG, Bell HA, Othman H, Gatehouse JA, Gatehouse AM - Mol. Breed. (2015)

Changes in diploid wheat leaf proteins following aphid infestation for 24 h (a) or for 8 days (b). Proteins identified were assigned to categories based on biological process GO terms, shown as number of total response in each category for each treatment. Proteins that could not be identified were not included. First character: R resistant line, S susceptible line. Second character: L local tissues, S systemic tissues
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4308650&req=5

Fig2: Changes in diploid wheat leaf proteins following aphid infestation for 24 h (a) or for 8 days (b). Proteins identified were assigned to categories based on biological process GO terms, shown as number of total response in each category for each treatment. Proteins that could not be identified were not included. First character: R resistant line, S susceptible line. Second character: L local tissues, S systemic tissues
Mentions: Identified up-regulated protein spots listed in Tables 1 and 2 are grouped by functional categories in Fig. 2a, b. The results clearly show that the majority of identified proteins that were differentially regulated in both the resistant (ACC20 PGR1755) and susceptible (ACC5 PGR1735) diploid line following aphid infestation were involved in photosynthesis or other metabolic processes or were classified as being uncharacterised/unknown. Other proteins identified in both lines were shown to be involved in: ATP synthesis, proteolysis, post-translational modification, immune response, nuclear mRNA splicing, mRNA and miRNA processing, chromosome organisation, cell division and cytokinesis (Tables 1, 2). However, there were notable differences in the response of these two lines, particularly in respect of the up-regulation of general and specific stress response proteins. Importantly, these results show that proteins known to be involved in the stress response and the defence response were clearly induced in the resistant line, but not the susceptible line, in response to aphid infestation (Fig. 3a, b) and that different proteins were up-regulated at different time points. Thus, both spatial and temporal effects were observed. For example, at 24 h (representing an early response), a heat stress TF and dehydrin were up-regulated as part of the local response, whereas NBS–LRR type resistant protein was up-regulated as part of the systemic response. At 8 days (late response), a different set of proteins (two putative stress-induced protein sti1, putative viral resistance protein, MEDsa GLB1 and HSP20-like chaperone) was up-regulated as part of the local response, whilst a NBS-containing resistance-like protein was up-regulated as part of the systemic response. Additionally, at 24 h post-infestation, transcription factors and proteins with roles in signalling were shown to be clearly induced in the resistant line; by day 8, proteins involved in protein synthesis were shown to be up-regulated in this line. Interestingly, DNA repair proteins were also up-regulated in the resistant line. These results also show that the majority of the up-regulated proteins (in terms of number) were induced locally rather than systemically (Fig. 2a, b).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: The present study was carried out to investigate the potential of a diploid wheat line (ACC20 PGR1755), reported as exhibiting resistance to S. avenae, to serve as a source of resistance genes.Proteomic analysis showed that approximately 200 protein spots were reproducibly detected in leaf extracts from both the resistant line and a comparable susceptible line (ACC5 PGR1735) using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and image comparison software.However, in the resistant line only, several stress response proteins (including NBS-LRR-like proteins) and oxidative stress response proteins were identified as up-regulated in response to aphid feeding, as well as proteins involved in DNA synthesis/replication/repair.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Newcastle Institute for Research on Sustainability, School of Biology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU UK.

ABSTRACT

The grain aphid Sitobion avenae (F.) is a major pest of wheat, acting as a virus vector as well as causing direct plant damage. Commonly grown wheat varieties in the UK have only limited resistance to this pest. The present study was carried out to investigate the potential of a diploid wheat line (ACC20 PGR1755), reported as exhibiting resistance to S. avenae, to serve as a source of resistance genes. The diploid wheat line was confirmed as partially resistant, substantially reducing the fecundity, longevity and growth rate of the aphid. Proteomic analysis showed that approximately 200 protein spots were reproducibly detected in leaf extracts from both the resistant line and a comparable susceptible line (ACC5 PGR1735) using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and image comparison software. Twenty-four spots were significantly up-regulated (>2-fold) in the resistant line after 24 h of aphid feeding (13 and 11 involved in local and systemic responses, respectively). Approximately 50 % of all differentially expressed protein spots were identified by a combination of database searching with MS and MS/MS data, revealing that the majority of proteins up-regulated by aphid infestation were involved in metabolic processes (including photosynthesis) and transcriptional regulation. However, in the resistant line only, several stress response proteins (including NBS-LRR-like proteins) and oxidative stress response proteins were identified as up-regulated in response to aphid feeding, as well as proteins involved in DNA synthesis/replication/repair. This study indicates that the resistant diploid line ACC20 PGR1755 may provide a valuable resource in breeding wheat for resistance to aphids.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus