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The microbiotest battery as an important component in the assessment of snowmelt toxicity in urban watercourses--preliminary studies.

Szklarek S, Stolarska M, Wagner I, Mankiewicz-Boczek J - Environ Monit Assess (2015)

Bottom Line: The most toxic snowmelt samples were found to be high acute hazard (class IV), while the remaining samples were rated as slight acute hazard (class II).L. sativum (in the Phytotox test) was the most sensitive test organism, giving 27 % of all toxic responses, followed by S. capricornutum with 23 % of all responses.T. thermophila was the least sensitive, with only 2 % of all toxic responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: European Regional Centre for Ecohydrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, 3, Tylna Str., 90-364, Lodz, Poland, sebszklarek@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the study was to use a battery of biotests composed of producers (Selenastrum capricornutum, Sorghum saccharatum, Lepidium sativum, and Sinapis alba), consumers (Thamnocephalus platyurus), and decomposers (Tetrahymena thermophila) to evaluate the toxicity of snowmelt and winter storm water samples. The toxicity of the samples collected in the winter period December to February (2010-2011), in one of the largest agglomerations in Poland, the city of Lodz, was compared to that of storm water samples taken under similar conditions in June. The most toxic snowmelt samples were found to be high acute hazard (class IV), while the remaining samples were rated as slight acute hazard (class II). L. sativum (in the Phytotox test) was the most sensitive test organism, giving 27 % of all toxic responses, followed by S. capricornutum with 23 % of all responses. T. thermophila was the least sensitive, with only 2 % of all toxic responses. The greatest range of toxicity was demonstrated by samples from the single family house catchment: no acute hazard (class I) to high acute hazard (class IV).

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Precipitation and air temperature conditions over the study period. PP sum of daily precipitation and T water temperature; the date of sample collection is given in the boxes
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Fig2: Precipitation and air temperature conditions over the study period. PP sum of daily precipitation and T water temperature; the date of sample collection is given in the boxes

Mentions: Snowmelt and winter rain water was collected from five measurement points on the outlets of the storm water sewage system during three sampling periods (Fig. 2). Water samples from the first period (5th December 2011) came from winter rain, with a daily total of 13 mm, after 43 days of a meteorologically dry period. The second set of snowmelt water samples, taken during January 2012, was obtained from a total capacity of melting snow of approximately 47-mm cover. The third set of water samples, taken in February 2012, represents the snowmelt derived from 3-day fresh snow cover with a depth of 13.2 mm. As an additional point of reference for the toxic effect and level of contamination during winter, water samples were also taken from a late spring rainfall event: the rainfall capacity was 10.2 mm and it occurred after two dry weather weeks. Samples from point SFH-1 were taken only during the third (February) and late spring terms. All samples were collected manually at the beginning of snowmelt or rain period, when the probability of the first flash effect was the highest.Fig. 2


The microbiotest battery as an important component in the assessment of snowmelt toxicity in urban watercourses--preliminary studies.

Szklarek S, Stolarska M, Wagner I, Mankiewicz-Boczek J - Environ Monit Assess (2015)

Precipitation and air temperature conditions over the study period. PP sum of daily precipitation and T water temperature; the date of sample collection is given in the boxes
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4308638&req=5

Fig2: Precipitation and air temperature conditions over the study period. PP sum of daily precipitation and T water temperature; the date of sample collection is given in the boxes
Mentions: Snowmelt and winter rain water was collected from five measurement points on the outlets of the storm water sewage system during three sampling periods (Fig. 2). Water samples from the first period (5th December 2011) came from winter rain, with a daily total of 13 mm, after 43 days of a meteorologically dry period. The second set of snowmelt water samples, taken during January 2012, was obtained from a total capacity of melting snow of approximately 47-mm cover. The third set of water samples, taken in February 2012, represents the snowmelt derived from 3-day fresh snow cover with a depth of 13.2 mm. As an additional point of reference for the toxic effect and level of contamination during winter, water samples were also taken from a late spring rainfall event: the rainfall capacity was 10.2 mm and it occurred after two dry weather weeks. Samples from point SFH-1 were taken only during the third (February) and late spring terms. All samples were collected manually at the beginning of snowmelt or rain period, when the probability of the first flash effect was the highest.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: The most toxic snowmelt samples were found to be high acute hazard (class IV), while the remaining samples were rated as slight acute hazard (class II).L. sativum (in the Phytotox test) was the most sensitive test organism, giving 27 % of all toxic responses, followed by S. capricornutum with 23 % of all responses.T. thermophila was the least sensitive, with only 2 % of all toxic responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: European Regional Centre for Ecohydrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, 3, Tylna Str., 90-364, Lodz, Poland, sebszklarek@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the study was to use a battery of biotests composed of producers (Selenastrum capricornutum, Sorghum saccharatum, Lepidium sativum, and Sinapis alba), consumers (Thamnocephalus platyurus), and decomposers (Tetrahymena thermophila) to evaluate the toxicity of snowmelt and winter storm water samples. The toxicity of the samples collected in the winter period December to February (2010-2011), in one of the largest agglomerations in Poland, the city of Lodz, was compared to that of storm water samples taken under similar conditions in June. The most toxic snowmelt samples were found to be high acute hazard (class IV), while the remaining samples were rated as slight acute hazard (class II). L. sativum (in the Phytotox test) was the most sensitive test organism, giving 27 % of all toxic responses, followed by S. capricornutum with 23 % of all responses. T. thermophila was the least sensitive, with only 2 % of all toxic responses. The greatest range of toxicity was demonstrated by samples from the single family house catchment: no acute hazard (class I) to high acute hazard (class IV).

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus