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The microbiotest battery as an important component in the assessment of snowmelt toxicity in urban watercourses--preliminary studies.

Szklarek S, Stolarska M, Wagner I, Mankiewicz-Boczek J - Environ Monit Assess (2015)

Bottom Line: The most toxic snowmelt samples were found to be high acute hazard (class IV), while the remaining samples were rated as slight acute hazard (class II).L. sativum (in the Phytotox test) was the most sensitive test organism, giving 27 % of all toxic responses, followed by S. capricornutum with 23 % of all responses.T. thermophila was the least sensitive, with only 2 % of all toxic responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: European Regional Centre for Ecohydrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, 3, Tylna Str., 90-364, Lodz, Poland, sebszklarek@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the study was to use a battery of biotests composed of producers (Selenastrum capricornutum, Sorghum saccharatum, Lepidium sativum, and Sinapis alba), consumers (Thamnocephalus platyurus), and decomposers (Tetrahymena thermophila) to evaluate the toxicity of snowmelt and winter storm water samples. The toxicity of the samples collected in the winter period December to February (2010-2011), in one of the largest agglomerations in Poland, the city of Lodz, was compared to that of storm water samples taken under similar conditions in June. The most toxic snowmelt samples were found to be high acute hazard (class IV), while the remaining samples were rated as slight acute hazard (class II). L. sativum (in the Phytotox test) was the most sensitive test organism, giving 27 % of all toxic responses, followed by S. capricornutum with 23 % of all responses. T. thermophila was the least sensitive, with only 2 % of all toxic responses. The greatest range of toxicity was demonstrated by samples from the single family house catchment: no acute hazard (class I) to high acute hazard (class IV).

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The locations of the measurement points and the key characteristics of Lodz city infrastructure and development zoning. 1 measurement points; 2 extent of combined sewage system; 3 build-up areas; 4 forest areas; 5 green spaces (parks); 6 garden plots; 7 water reservoirs; 8 river network; 9 administrative borders of the city
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Fig1: The locations of the measurement points and the key characteristics of Lodz city infrastructure and development zoning. 1 measurement points; 2 extent of combined sewage system; 3 build-up areas; 4 forest areas; 5 green spaces (parks); 6 garden plots; 7 water reservoirs; 8 river network; 9 administrative borders of the city

Mentions: The city of Lodz has the third largest population index of urban centers in Poland, with 728.9 thousand inhabitants and an area of 293.3 km2 (GUS 2012). The city is located on the main watershed of the Oder and Vistula. The study was conducted at five outlets of the separated storm water sewer system discharging directly to four of the rivers of Lodz (Fig. 1). The five measurement points were located at outlets of storm water catchments which were chosen to represent different extents of drained area and land development types. Sampling points at outlets IND-1 and IND-2 correspond to predominantly industrial areas. Storm water catchments SNF-1 and SNF-2 are located in areas with single family houses, while BF-1 represents an area with blocks of flats as the predominant form of land development.Fig. 1


The microbiotest battery as an important component in the assessment of snowmelt toxicity in urban watercourses--preliminary studies.

Szklarek S, Stolarska M, Wagner I, Mankiewicz-Boczek J - Environ Monit Assess (2015)

The locations of the measurement points and the key characteristics of Lodz city infrastructure and development zoning. 1 measurement points; 2 extent of combined sewage system; 3 build-up areas; 4 forest areas; 5 green spaces (parks); 6 garden plots; 7 water reservoirs; 8 river network; 9 administrative borders of the city
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4308638&req=5

Fig1: The locations of the measurement points and the key characteristics of Lodz city infrastructure and development zoning. 1 measurement points; 2 extent of combined sewage system; 3 build-up areas; 4 forest areas; 5 green spaces (parks); 6 garden plots; 7 water reservoirs; 8 river network; 9 administrative borders of the city
Mentions: The city of Lodz has the third largest population index of urban centers in Poland, with 728.9 thousand inhabitants and an area of 293.3 km2 (GUS 2012). The city is located on the main watershed of the Oder and Vistula. The study was conducted at five outlets of the separated storm water sewer system discharging directly to four of the rivers of Lodz (Fig. 1). The five measurement points were located at outlets of storm water catchments which were chosen to represent different extents of drained area and land development types. Sampling points at outlets IND-1 and IND-2 correspond to predominantly industrial areas. Storm water catchments SNF-1 and SNF-2 are located in areas with single family houses, while BF-1 represents an area with blocks of flats as the predominant form of land development.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The most toxic snowmelt samples were found to be high acute hazard (class IV), while the remaining samples were rated as slight acute hazard (class II).L. sativum (in the Phytotox test) was the most sensitive test organism, giving 27 % of all toxic responses, followed by S. capricornutum with 23 % of all responses.T. thermophila was the least sensitive, with only 2 % of all toxic responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: European Regional Centre for Ecohydrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, 3, Tylna Str., 90-364, Lodz, Poland, sebszklarek@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the study was to use a battery of biotests composed of producers (Selenastrum capricornutum, Sorghum saccharatum, Lepidium sativum, and Sinapis alba), consumers (Thamnocephalus platyurus), and decomposers (Tetrahymena thermophila) to evaluate the toxicity of snowmelt and winter storm water samples. The toxicity of the samples collected in the winter period December to February (2010-2011), in one of the largest agglomerations in Poland, the city of Lodz, was compared to that of storm water samples taken under similar conditions in June. The most toxic snowmelt samples were found to be high acute hazard (class IV), while the remaining samples were rated as slight acute hazard (class II). L. sativum (in the Phytotox test) was the most sensitive test organism, giving 27 % of all toxic responses, followed by S. capricornutum with 23 % of all responses. T. thermophila was the least sensitive, with only 2 % of all toxic responses. The greatest range of toxicity was demonstrated by samples from the single family house catchment: no acute hazard (class I) to high acute hazard (class IV).

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus