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Authentication of beef versus horse meat using 60 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy.

Jakes W, Gerdova A, Defernez M, Watson AD, McCallum C, Limer E, Colquhoun IJ, Williamson DC, Kemsley EK - Food Chem (2014)

Bottom Line: Principal component analysis gave a two-dimensional "authentic" beef region (p=0.001) against which further spectra could be compared.The outcomes indicated that storing samples by freezing does not adversely affect the analysis.We conclude that 60 MHz (1)H NMR represents a feasible high-throughput approach for screening raw meat.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Analytical Sciences Unit, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK.

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1H 60 MHz NMR spectra (Lab 2 training data) for beef (upper trace) and horse (lower trace), displaced vertically for clarity and normalised to the glyceride peak area. Rectangles highlight four regions of interest.
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f0005: 1H 60 MHz NMR spectra (Lab 2 training data) for beef (upper trace) and horse (lower trace), displaced vertically for clarity and normalised to the glyceride peak area. Rectangles highlight four regions of interest.

Mentions: An exemplary collection of spectra (Training Set, Lab 2 data) is shown in Fig. 1. For clarity, the groups of spectra from the two meat species are vertically offset with respect to one another. In broad terms, these are typical 60 1H MHz spectra of triglycerides that contain a range of long-chain fatty acids with differing amounts of unsaturation. Some of the key spectral regions are indicated, based on the assignment given for 60 MHz 1H NMR of triglycerides by Parker et al. (2014). It can be seen that there is more variation amongst the spectra from horse samples compared with those from beef and, furthermore, that some of the former are considerably noisier and thus are distinguished more easily in the overlaid spectra of Fig. 1. This is likely a consequence of the generally lower fat content of horse compared to beef.


Authentication of beef versus horse meat using 60 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy.

Jakes W, Gerdova A, Defernez M, Watson AD, McCallum C, Limer E, Colquhoun IJ, Williamson DC, Kemsley EK - Food Chem (2014)

1H 60 MHz NMR spectra (Lab 2 training data) for beef (upper trace) and horse (lower trace), displaced vertically for clarity and normalised to the glyceride peak area. Rectangles highlight four regions of interest.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4308633&req=5

f0005: 1H 60 MHz NMR spectra (Lab 2 training data) for beef (upper trace) and horse (lower trace), displaced vertically for clarity and normalised to the glyceride peak area. Rectangles highlight four regions of interest.
Mentions: An exemplary collection of spectra (Training Set, Lab 2 data) is shown in Fig. 1. For clarity, the groups of spectra from the two meat species are vertically offset with respect to one another. In broad terms, these are typical 60 1H MHz spectra of triglycerides that contain a range of long-chain fatty acids with differing amounts of unsaturation. Some of the key spectral regions are indicated, based on the assignment given for 60 MHz 1H NMR of triglycerides by Parker et al. (2014). It can be seen that there is more variation amongst the spectra from horse samples compared with those from beef and, furthermore, that some of the former are considerably noisier and thus are distinguished more easily in the overlaid spectra of Fig. 1. This is likely a consequence of the generally lower fat content of horse compared to beef.

Bottom Line: Principal component analysis gave a two-dimensional "authentic" beef region (p=0.001) against which further spectra could be compared.The outcomes indicated that storing samples by freezing does not adversely affect the analysis.We conclude that 60 MHz (1)H NMR represents a feasible high-throughput approach for screening raw meat.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Analytical Sciences Unit, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK.

Show MeSH