Limits...
Pollinator limitation on reproductive success in Iris tuberosa.

Pellegrino G - AoB Plants (2014)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, the increase in plant size and floral display did not increase the frequency of pollinator visitations and so did not increase the fruit set.Thus, despite the widespread effects of flowering plant size on pollinator attraction and plant reproduction in other species, these effects are lacking in I. tuberosa.These results suggest that sexual reproduction of I. tuberosa is fairly limited by pollinators and not by resource limitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Ecology and Earth Science, University of Calabria, I-87036 Rende, Italy giuseppe.pellegrino@unical.it.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pollinator species in four populations (blue scale bars, Cassano; red scale bars, Corato; green scale bars, Acquarola; yellow scale bars = Lucignano) and total (black scale bars) of I. tuberosa (ns: not significant; ***P < 0.001).
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PLU089F3: Pollinator species in four populations (blue scale bars, Cassano; red scale bars, Corato; green scale bars, Acquarola; yellow scale bars = Lucignano) and total (black scale bars) of I. tuberosa (ns: not significant; ***P < 0.001).

Mentions: A total of 722 insects were observed in I. tuberosa flowers. All the insects collected on I. tuberosa flowers were found mainly between 1000 and 1200 h and between 1400 and 1600 h on sunny days (Fig. 2). Nine species were recognized as effective pollinators belonging to five genera of Hymenoptera (Andrena, Anthophora, Colletes, Lasioglossum and Xylocopa). Hymenopteran bees are considered the principal pollinating agents of Iris species. Consistent with this, I. tuberosa were exclusively pollinated by hymenopteran species. Among them, Andrena was the dominant genus representing >65 % (504/722) of I. tuberosa pollinators (Fig. 3). In particular, the main pollinators were Andrena nigroaenea, A. flavipes, A. bicolor, A. creberrima and A. morio (Fig. 3). Of the 622 insects (78 %) 565 were males. There were no significant differences between the populations with regard to the number of pollinators (F1,3 = 1.37, P = 0.15 by ANOVA). No pollinator was ever observed moving from one unit to another unit within the same flower. Indeed, the most frequent behaviour for all bees was to visit only one floral unit of a flower and then move to another flower. In all sites, the frequencies of pollinators were not significantly different between ‘tall’ and ‘short’ plants (F1,3 = 0.81, P = 0.38 by ANOVA).Figure 2.


Pollinator limitation on reproductive success in Iris tuberosa.

Pellegrino G - AoB Plants (2014)

Pollinator species in four populations (blue scale bars, Cassano; red scale bars, Corato; green scale bars, Acquarola; yellow scale bars = Lucignano) and total (black scale bars) of I. tuberosa (ns: not significant; ***P < 0.001).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4307841&req=5

PLU089F3: Pollinator species in four populations (blue scale bars, Cassano; red scale bars, Corato; green scale bars, Acquarola; yellow scale bars = Lucignano) and total (black scale bars) of I. tuberosa (ns: not significant; ***P < 0.001).
Mentions: A total of 722 insects were observed in I. tuberosa flowers. All the insects collected on I. tuberosa flowers were found mainly between 1000 and 1200 h and between 1400 and 1600 h on sunny days (Fig. 2). Nine species were recognized as effective pollinators belonging to five genera of Hymenoptera (Andrena, Anthophora, Colletes, Lasioglossum and Xylocopa). Hymenopteran bees are considered the principal pollinating agents of Iris species. Consistent with this, I. tuberosa were exclusively pollinated by hymenopteran species. Among them, Andrena was the dominant genus representing >65 % (504/722) of I. tuberosa pollinators (Fig. 3). In particular, the main pollinators were Andrena nigroaenea, A. flavipes, A. bicolor, A. creberrima and A. morio (Fig. 3). Of the 622 insects (78 %) 565 were males. There were no significant differences between the populations with regard to the number of pollinators (F1,3 = 1.37, P = 0.15 by ANOVA). No pollinator was ever observed moving from one unit to another unit within the same flower. Indeed, the most frequent behaviour for all bees was to visit only one floral unit of a flower and then move to another flower. In all sites, the frequencies of pollinators were not significantly different between ‘tall’ and ‘short’ plants (F1,3 = 0.81, P = 0.38 by ANOVA).Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Furthermore, the increase in plant size and floral display did not increase the frequency of pollinator visitations and so did not increase the fruit set.Thus, despite the widespread effects of flowering plant size on pollinator attraction and plant reproduction in other species, these effects are lacking in I. tuberosa.These results suggest that sexual reproduction of I. tuberosa is fairly limited by pollinators and not by resource limitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Ecology and Earth Science, University of Calabria, I-87036 Rende, Italy giuseppe.pellegrino@unical.it.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus