Limits...
Pollinator limitation on reproductive success in Iris tuberosa.

Pellegrino G - AoB Plants (2014)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, the increase in plant size and floral display did not increase the frequency of pollinator visitations and so did not increase the fruit set.Thus, despite the widespread effects of flowering plant size on pollinator attraction and plant reproduction in other species, these effects are lacking in I. tuberosa.These results suggest that sexual reproduction of I. tuberosa is fairly limited by pollinators and not by resource limitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Ecology and Earth Science, University of Calabria, I-87036 Rende, Italy giuseppe.pellegrino@unical.it.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Location of four populations: Cassano (1), Corato (2), Acquarola (3) and Lucignano (4) of I. tuberosa in central-southern Italy.
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PLU089F1: Location of four populations: Cassano (1), Corato (2), Acquarola (3) and Lucignano (4) of I. tuberosa in central-southern Italy.

Mentions: Iris tuberosa is a native species of Mediterranean regions including Southern Europe, the Balkans and Northern Africa (Mathew 1987). In Italy, where I conducted fieldwork, the species occurs mainly in the country's central and southern regions where it grows in dry, usually rocky places, in olive groves, and among hedges (Pignatti 1982). Flowers of I. tuberosa are hermaphroditic and trimerous, thus consisting of two whorls of petal-like members (a brownish outer and a greenish inner series of tepals), with three stamens inserted opposite to the outer tepals and an inferior ovary of three united carpels sharing a common style. Information regarding its reproduction system is rather scarce. Although I. tuberosa ovaries contain over 100 ovules, each produces capsules with only a few mature seeds (9–12 seeds), which are randomly distributed along the placentas, due to the low germination rate and the low number of pollen tubes which reach the ovary (Grilli Caiola and Brandizzi 1997; Grilli Caiola et al. 2000). Observations were conducted during the flowering period of I. tuberosa in March–May of 2012 and 2013 in four sites called Cassano, Corato, Acquarola and Lucignano in central-southern Italy (Fig. 1). To minimize the effects of soil and vegetation types on measurements, I chose sites of matched vegetation types. All sites consist of calcareous, dry grasslands (Festuco-Brometalia); Spartium junceum L., Cytisus sessilifolius L. and Cistus incanus L. are the frequent shrubs and Festuca circummediterranea Patzke, Bromus erectus Huds. and Dactylis glomerata L. are the dominant herbs.Figure 1.


Pollinator limitation on reproductive success in Iris tuberosa.

Pellegrino G - AoB Plants (2014)

Location of four populations: Cassano (1), Corato (2), Acquarola (3) and Lucignano (4) of I. tuberosa in central-southern Italy.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4307841&req=5

PLU089F1: Location of four populations: Cassano (1), Corato (2), Acquarola (3) and Lucignano (4) of I. tuberosa in central-southern Italy.
Mentions: Iris tuberosa is a native species of Mediterranean regions including Southern Europe, the Balkans and Northern Africa (Mathew 1987). In Italy, where I conducted fieldwork, the species occurs mainly in the country's central and southern regions where it grows in dry, usually rocky places, in olive groves, and among hedges (Pignatti 1982). Flowers of I. tuberosa are hermaphroditic and trimerous, thus consisting of two whorls of petal-like members (a brownish outer and a greenish inner series of tepals), with three stamens inserted opposite to the outer tepals and an inferior ovary of three united carpels sharing a common style. Information regarding its reproduction system is rather scarce. Although I. tuberosa ovaries contain over 100 ovules, each produces capsules with only a few mature seeds (9–12 seeds), which are randomly distributed along the placentas, due to the low germination rate and the low number of pollen tubes which reach the ovary (Grilli Caiola and Brandizzi 1997; Grilli Caiola et al. 2000). Observations were conducted during the flowering period of I. tuberosa in March–May of 2012 and 2013 in four sites called Cassano, Corato, Acquarola and Lucignano in central-southern Italy (Fig. 1). To minimize the effects of soil and vegetation types on measurements, I chose sites of matched vegetation types. All sites consist of calcareous, dry grasslands (Festuco-Brometalia); Spartium junceum L., Cytisus sessilifolius L. and Cistus incanus L. are the frequent shrubs and Festuca circummediterranea Patzke, Bromus erectus Huds. and Dactylis glomerata L. are the dominant herbs.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Furthermore, the increase in plant size and floral display did not increase the frequency of pollinator visitations and so did not increase the fruit set.Thus, despite the widespread effects of flowering plant size on pollinator attraction and plant reproduction in other species, these effects are lacking in I. tuberosa.These results suggest that sexual reproduction of I. tuberosa is fairly limited by pollinators and not by resource limitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Ecology and Earth Science, University of Calabria, I-87036 Rende, Italy giuseppe.pellegrino@unical.it.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus