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Intracranial Lesions with Low Signal Intensity on T2-weighted MR Images - Review of Pathologies.

Zimny A, Neska-Matuszewska M, Bladowska J, Sąsiadek MJ - Pol J Radiol (2015)

Bottom Line: In this article we presented intracranial pathological substances and lesions with low signal intensity on T2-weighted images.Eight groups of substances were discussed i.e. 1.Gadolinium-based contrast materials, 2. hemoglobin degradation products 3. melanin, 4. mucous- or protein-containing lesions, 5. highly cellular lesions, 6. lesions containing mineral substances such as: calcium, copper and iron, 7. turbulent and rapid blood or CSF flow 8. air-containing spaces.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Wrocław Medical University, Wrocław, Poland.

ABSTRACT
In this article we presented intracranial pathological substances and lesions with low signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Eight groups of substances were discussed i.e. 1. Gadolinium-based contrast materials, 2. hemoglobin degradation products 3. melanin, 4. mucous- or protein-containing lesions, 5. highly cellular lesions, 6. lesions containing mineral substances such as: calcium, copper and iron, 7. turbulent and rapid blood or CSF flow 8. air-containing spaces. Appropriate interpretation of signal intensity as well as analysis of lesion location and clinical symptoms enable a correct choice of a further diagnostic algorithm or, in many cases, final diagnosis based exclusively on an MRI examination.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fahr’s disease. Unenhanced CT image (A) shows typical bilateral calcifications in the region of basal ganglia. T2-weighted image (B) shows hypointense both globi pallidi, while T2* image (C) reveals larger areas of hypointensity due to a susceptibility artifact and a “blooming effect”.
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f14-poljradiol-80-40: Fahr’s disease. Unenhanced CT image (A) shows typical bilateral calcifications in the region of basal ganglia. T2-weighted image (B) shows hypointense both globi pallidi, while T2* image (C) reveals larger areas of hypointensity due to a susceptibility artifact and a “blooming effect”.

Mentions: Calcium-containing structures (cortical bone, calcifications) are typically hypointense on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images. Calcium has non-mobile protons bound to macromolecules which results in signal void most apparent on T2-weighted MR images. The most common non-tumorous location of calcium deposits and calcifications are basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. Fine calcifications within the basal ganglia are mostly incidental findings without clinical significance. The remarkable calcifications of the basal ganglia and cerebellum (dentate nucleus) have been traditionally called Fahr’s disease (Figure 14). This idiopathic disorder can appear at any stage of life causing dementia and the loss of routine motor skills [6,24].


Intracranial Lesions with Low Signal Intensity on T2-weighted MR Images - Review of Pathologies.

Zimny A, Neska-Matuszewska M, Bladowska J, Sąsiadek MJ - Pol J Radiol (2015)

Fahr’s disease. Unenhanced CT image (A) shows typical bilateral calcifications in the region of basal ganglia. T2-weighted image (B) shows hypointense both globi pallidi, while T2* image (C) reveals larger areas of hypointensity due to a susceptibility artifact and a “blooming effect”.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4307690&req=5

f14-poljradiol-80-40: Fahr’s disease. Unenhanced CT image (A) shows typical bilateral calcifications in the region of basal ganglia. T2-weighted image (B) shows hypointense both globi pallidi, while T2* image (C) reveals larger areas of hypointensity due to a susceptibility artifact and a “blooming effect”.
Mentions: Calcium-containing structures (cortical bone, calcifications) are typically hypointense on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images. Calcium has non-mobile protons bound to macromolecules which results in signal void most apparent on T2-weighted MR images. The most common non-tumorous location of calcium deposits and calcifications are basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. Fine calcifications within the basal ganglia are mostly incidental findings without clinical significance. The remarkable calcifications of the basal ganglia and cerebellum (dentate nucleus) have been traditionally called Fahr’s disease (Figure 14). This idiopathic disorder can appear at any stage of life causing dementia and the loss of routine motor skills [6,24].

Bottom Line: In this article we presented intracranial pathological substances and lesions with low signal intensity on T2-weighted images.Eight groups of substances were discussed i.e. 1.Gadolinium-based contrast materials, 2. hemoglobin degradation products 3. melanin, 4. mucous- or protein-containing lesions, 5. highly cellular lesions, 6. lesions containing mineral substances such as: calcium, copper and iron, 7. turbulent and rapid blood or CSF flow 8. air-containing spaces.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Wrocław Medical University, Wrocław, Poland.

ABSTRACT
In this article we presented intracranial pathological substances and lesions with low signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Eight groups of substances were discussed i.e. 1. Gadolinium-based contrast materials, 2. hemoglobin degradation products 3. melanin, 4. mucous- or protein-containing lesions, 5. highly cellular lesions, 6. lesions containing mineral substances such as: calcium, copper and iron, 7. turbulent and rapid blood or CSF flow 8. air-containing spaces. Appropriate interpretation of signal intensity as well as analysis of lesion location and clinical symptoms enable a correct choice of a further diagnostic algorithm or, in many cases, final diagnosis based exclusively on an MRI examination.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus