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Intracranial Lesions with Low Signal Intensity on T2-weighted MR Images - Review of Pathologies.

Zimny A, Neska-Matuszewska M, Bladowska J, Sąsiadek MJ - Pol J Radiol (2015)

Bottom Line: In this article we presented intracranial pathological substances and lesions with low signal intensity on T2-weighted images.Eight groups of substances were discussed i.e. 1.Gadolinium-based contrast materials, 2. hemoglobin degradation products 3. melanin, 4. mucous- or protein-containing lesions, 5. highly cellular lesions, 6. lesions containing mineral substances such as: calcium, copper and iron, 7. turbulent and rapid blood or CSF flow 8. air-containing spaces.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Wrocław Medical University, Wrocław, Poland.

ABSTRACT
In this article we presented intracranial pathological substances and lesions with low signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Eight groups of substances were discussed i.e. 1. Gadolinium-based contrast materials, 2. hemoglobin degradation products 3. melanin, 4. mucous- or protein-containing lesions, 5. highly cellular lesions, 6. lesions containing mineral substances such as: calcium, copper and iron, 7. turbulent and rapid blood or CSF flow 8. air-containing spaces. Appropriate interpretation of signal intensity as well as analysis of lesion location and clinical symptoms enable a correct choice of a further diagnostic algorithm or, in many cases, final diagnosis based exclusively on an MRI examination.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cavernoma and developmental venous anomaly within the left cerebellar hemisphere. T2-weighted image (A) shows hypointense oval cavernoma and bands of superficial hemosiderosis due to chronic bleeding which are better depicted on SWI (B). Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image (C) reveals coexisting developmental venous anomaly.
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f7-poljradiol-80-40: Cavernoma and developmental venous anomaly within the left cerebellar hemisphere. T2-weighted image (A) shows hypointense oval cavernoma and bands of superficial hemosiderosis due to chronic bleeding which are better depicted on SWI (B). Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image (C) reveals coexisting developmental venous anomaly.

Mentions: Cavernous vascular malformations (cavernous angiomas) produce a very typical T2-appearance called “salt and pepper “ or “popcorn ball” (Figure 6). They are hamartous dysplasias characterized by abnormally dilated vascular channels lined by a single layer of endothelium surrounded by hemosiderin deposits and gliosis. Intracranial cavernomas are commonly located in the supratentorial region, brain stem, basal ganglia, and cerebellar hemispheres. T2-weighted images show cavernomas as lesions with low-intensity margins containing hemosiderin and high-intensity central areas indicating gliosis or acute bleeding [8]. Cavernomas are found as single or multiple lesions. They can appear after radiotherapy and are reported in up to 33% of patients with developmental venous anomalies (DVA) as coexisting lesions. In such cases cavernomas are responsible for incidences of bleeding, not DVAs [9] (Figure 7).


Intracranial Lesions with Low Signal Intensity on T2-weighted MR Images - Review of Pathologies.

Zimny A, Neska-Matuszewska M, Bladowska J, Sąsiadek MJ - Pol J Radiol (2015)

Cavernoma and developmental venous anomaly within the left cerebellar hemisphere. T2-weighted image (A) shows hypointense oval cavernoma and bands of superficial hemosiderosis due to chronic bleeding which are better depicted on SWI (B). Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image (C) reveals coexisting developmental venous anomaly.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4307690&req=5

f7-poljradiol-80-40: Cavernoma and developmental venous anomaly within the left cerebellar hemisphere. T2-weighted image (A) shows hypointense oval cavernoma and bands of superficial hemosiderosis due to chronic bleeding which are better depicted on SWI (B). Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image (C) reveals coexisting developmental venous anomaly.
Mentions: Cavernous vascular malformations (cavernous angiomas) produce a very typical T2-appearance called “salt and pepper “ or “popcorn ball” (Figure 6). They are hamartous dysplasias characterized by abnormally dilated vascular channels lined by a single layer of endothelium surrounded by hemosiderin deposits and gliosis. Intracranial cavernomas are commonly located in the supratentorial region, brain stem, basal ganglia, and cerebellar hemispheres. T2-weighted images show cavernomas as lesions with low-intensity margins containing hemosiderin and high-intensity central areas indicating gliosis or acute bleeding [8]. Cavernomas are found as single or multiple lesions. They can appear after radiotherapy and are reported in up to 33% of patients with developmental venous anomalies (DVA) as coexisting lesions. In such cases cavernomas are responsible for incidences of bleeding, not DVAs [9] (Figure 7).

Bottom Line: In this article we presented intracranial pathological substances and lesions with low signal intensity on T2-weighted images.Eight groups of substances were discussed i.e. 1.Gadolinium-based contrast materials, 2. hemoglobin degradation products 3. melanin, 4. mucous- or protein-containing lesions, 5. highly cellular lesions, 6. lesions containing mineral substances such as: calcium, copper and iron, 7. turbulent and rapid blood or CSF flow 8. air-containing spaces.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Wrocław Medical University, Wrocław, Poland.

ABSTRACT
In this article we presented intracranial pathological substances and lesions with low signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Eight groups of substances were discussed i.e. 1. Gadolinium-based contrast materials, 2. hemoglobin degradation products 3. melanin, 4. mucous- or protein-containing lesions, 5. highly cellular lesions, 6. lesions containing mineral substances such as: calcium, copper and iron, 7. turbulent and rapid blood or CSF flow 8. air-containing spaces. Appropriate interpretation of signal intensity as well as analysis of lesion location and clinical symptoms enable a correct choice of a further diagnostic algorithm or, in many cases, final diagnosis based exclusively on an MRI examination.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus