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Everybody wants it done but nobody wants to do it: an exploration of the barrier and enablers of critical components towards creating a clinical pathway for anxiety and depression in cancer.

Rankin NM, Butow PN, Thein T, Robinson T, Shaw JM, Price MA, Clover K, Shaw T, Grimison P - BMC Health Serv Res (2015)

Bottom Line: This study aimed to explore barriers to and enablers for future implementation of a draft clinical pathway for anxiety and depression in cancer patients in the Australian context.Five interrelated themes were identified: ownership; resources and responsibility; education and training; patient reluctance; and integration with health services beyond oncology.The five themes were perceived as both barriers and enablers and provide a basis for an implementation plan that includes strategies to overcome barriers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Translational Research Fellow, Sydney Catalyst, The University of Sydney, Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Level 6, 119-143 Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW, 2050, Australia. nicole.rankin@ctc.usyd.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study aimed to explore barriers to and enablers for future implementation of a draft clinical pathway for anxiety and depression in cancer patients in the Australian context.

Methods: Health professionals reviewed a draft clinical pathway and participated in qualitative interviews about the delivery of psychosocial care in their setting, individual components of the draft pathway, and barriers and enablers for its future implementation.

Results: Five interrelated themes were identified: ownership; resources and responsibility; education and training; patient reluctance; and integration with health services beyond oncology.

Conclusions: The five themes were perceived as both barriers and enablers and provide a basis for an implementation plan that includes strategies to overcome barriers. The next steps are to design and deliver the clinical pathway with specific implementation strategies that address team ownership, endorsement by leaders, education and training modules designed for health professionals and patients and identify ways to integrate the pathway into existing cancer services.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Intersecting qualitative themes identified in the analysis.
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Fig1: Intersecting qualitative themes identified in the analysis.

Mentions: The thematic analysis revealed five themes about the implementation of the clinical pathway, including: ownership; resources and responsibilities; education and training; patient reluctance to access support; and integration with health services beyond oncology. Figure 1 was developed by the authors to demonstrate the interconnectedness and overlap of the themes as they emerged from analysis of the participants’ quotes.Figure 1


Everybody wants it done but nobody wants to do it: an exploration of the barrier and enablers of critical components towards creating a clinical pathway for anxiety and depression in cancer.

Rankin NM, Butow PN, Thein T, Robinson T, Shaw JM, Price MA, Clover K, Shaw T, Grimison P - BMC Health Serv Res (2015)

Intersecting qualitative themes identified in the analysis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4307637&req=5

Fig1: Intersecting qualitative themes identified in the analysis.
Mentions: The thematic analysis revealed five themes about the implementation of the clinical pathway, including: ownership; resources and responsibilities; education and training; patient reluctance to access support; and integration with health services beyond oncology. Figure 1 was developed by the authors to demonstrate the interconnectedness and overlap of the themes as they emerged from analysis of the participants’ quotes.Figure 1

Bottom Line: This study aimed to explore barriers to and enablers for future implementation of a draft clinical pathway for anxiety and depression in cancer patients in the Australian context.Five interrelated themes were identified: ownership; resources and responsibility; education and training; patient reluctance; and integration with health services beyond oncology.The five themes were perceived as both barriers and enablers and provide a basis for an implementation plan that includes strategies to overcome barriers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Translational Research Fellow, Sydney Catalyst, The University of Sydney, Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Level 6, 119-143 Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW, 2050, Australia. nicole.rankin@ctc.usyd.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study aimed to explore barriers to and enablers for future implementation of a draft clinical pathway for anxiety and depression in cancer patients in the Australian context.

Methods: Health professionals reviewed a draft clinical pathway and participated in qualitative interviews about the delivery of psychosocial care in their setting, individual components of the draft pathway, and barriers and enablers for its future implementation.

Results: Five interrelated themes were identified: ownership; resources and responsibility; education and training; patient reluctance; and integration with health services beyond oncology.

Conclusions: The five themes were perceived as both barriers and enablers and provide a basis for an implementation plan that includes strategies to overcome barriers. The next steps are to design and deliver the clinical pathway with specific implementation strategies that address team ownership, endorsement by leaders, education and training modules designed for health professionals and patients and identify ways to integrate the pathway into existing cancer services.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus