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Pregabalin in childhood epilepsy: a clinical trial study.

Mollamohammadi M, Tonkaboni SH, Pirzadeh Z, Vahedian M - Iran J Child Neurol (2014)

Bottom Line: The prevalence of active epilepsy is about 0.5-1%, and approximately 70% of patients are cured with first anti-epileptic drugs and the remaining patients need multiple drugs.To the best of our knowledge, there is no research with this drug in childhood epilepsy.The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of pregabalin in the reduction of seizures for refractory epilepsy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pediatric Neurology Department, Hazrat Fatemeh Masoumeh Hospital, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The prevalence of active epilepsy is about 0.5-1%, and approximately 70% of patients are cured with first anti-epileptic drugs and the remaining patients need multiple drugs. Pregabalin as an add-on therapy has a postive effect on refractory seizures in adults. To the best of our knowledge, there is no research with this drug in childhood epilepsy. We use pregabalin in children with refractory seizures as an add-on therapy. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of pregabalin in the reduction of seizures for refractory epilepsy.

Material & methods: Forty patients with refractory seizures who were referred to Mofid Children's Hospital and Hazrat Masoumeh Hospital were selected. A questionnaire based on patient record forms, demographic data (age, gender,…), type of seizure, clinical signs, EEG record, imaging report, drugs that had been used, drugs currently being used, and the number of seizures before and after Pregabalin treatment was completed. We checked the number of seizures after one and four months.

Results: After one month, 26.8% of patients had more than a 50% reduction in seizures and 14.6% of these patients were seizure-free; 12.2% had a 25-50% reduction; and approximately 61% had less than a 25% reduction or no change in seizures. After the fourth month, 34.1% of patients had more than a 50% reduction in seizures and 24.4% of these patients were seizure-free. Additionally, 65.9% of patients had less than 50% reduction in seizures (9.8% between 25-50% and 56.1% less than 25% or without improvement).

Conclusion: We recommend Pregabalin as an add-on therapy for refractory seizures (except for myoclonic seizures) for children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of pregabalin on reduction of seizure
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Figure 1: Effect of pregabalin on reduction of seizure

Mentions: The results of ANOVA with repetitive measurements show a significant difference between the mean rate of seizures before and after intervention with Pregabalin (F=9.36, p=0.001) (Figure 1).


Pregabalin in childhood epilepsy: a clinical trial study.

Mollamohammadi M, Tonkaboni SH, Pirzadeh Z, Vahedian M - Iran J Child Neurol (2014)

Effect of pregabalin on reduction of seizure
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4307370&req=5

Figure 1: Effect of pregabalin on reduction of seizure
Mentions: The results of ANOVA with repetitive measurements show a significant difference between the mean rate of seizures before and after intervention with Pregabalin (F=9.36, p=0.001) (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: The prevalence of active epilepsy is about 0.5-1%, and approximately 70% of patients are cured with first anti-epileptic drugs and the remaining patients need multiple drugs.To the best of our knowledge, there is no research with this drug in childhood epilepsy.The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of pregabalin in the reduction of seizures for refractory epilepsy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pediatric Neurology Department, Hazrat Fatemeh Masoumeh Hospital, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The prevalence of active epilepsy is about 0.5-1%, and approximately 70% of patients are cured with first anti-epileptic drugs and the remaining patients need multiple drugs. Pregabalin as an add-on therapy has a postive effect on refractory seizures in adults. To the best of our knowledge, there is no research with this drug in childhood epilepsy. We use pregabalin in children with refractory seizures as an add-on therapy. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of pregabalin in the reduction of seizures for refractory epilepsy.

Material & methods: Forty patients with refractory seizures who were referred to Mofid Children's Hospital and Hazrat Masoumeh Hospital were selected. A questionnaire based on patient record forms, demographic data (age, gender,…), type of seizure, clinical signs, EEG record, imaging report, drugs that had been used, drugs currently being used, and the number of seizures before and after Pregabalin treatment was completed. We checked the number of seizures after one and four months.

Results: After one month, 26.8% of patients had more than a 50% reduction in seizures and 14.6% of these patients were seizure-free; 12.2% had a 25-50% reduction; and approximately 61% had less than a 25% reduction or no change in seizures. After the fourth month, 34.1% of patients had more than a 50% reduction in seizures and 24.4% of these patients were seizure-free. Additionally, 65.9% of patients had less than 50% reduction in seizures (9.8% between 25-50% and 56.1% less than 25% or without improvement).

Conclusion: We recommend Pregabalin as an add-on therapy for refractory seizures (except for myoclonic seizures) for children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus