Limits...
Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of pyeongwisan on LPS-stimulated murine macrophages and mouse models of acetic acid-induced writhing response and xylene-induced ear edema.

Oh YC, Jeong YH, Cho WK, Ha JH, Gu MJ, Ma JY - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: However, its effects on inflammation-related diseases are unknown.We demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects and inhibitory mechanism in macrophages as well as inhibitory activity of PW in vivo for the first time.Our results suggest the potential value of PW as an inflammatory therapeutic agent developed from a natural substance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Korean Medicine (KM)-Based Herbal Drug Development Group, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, 461-24, Jeonmin-dong, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-811, Korea. ulivuli@kiom.re.kr.

ABSTRACT
Pyeongwisan (PW) is an herbal medication used in traditional East Asian medicine to treat anorexia, abdominal distension, borborygmus and diarrhea caused by gastric catarrh, atony and dilatation. However, its effects on inflammation-related diseases are unknown. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of PW on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in macrophages and on local inflammation in vivo. We investigated the biological effects of PW on the production of inflammatory mediators, pro-inflammatory cytokines and related products as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Additionally, we evaluated the analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response and the inhibitory activity on xylene-induced ear edema in mice. PW showed anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In addition, PW strongly suppressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a NO synthesis enzyme, induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and inhibited NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation. Also, PW suppressed TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β cytokine production in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophage cells. Furthermore, PW showed an analgesic effect on the writhing response and an inhibitory effect on mice ear edema. We demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects and inhibitory mechanism in macrophages as well as inhibitory activity of PW in vivo for the first time. Our results suggest the potential value of PW as an inflammatory therapeutic agent developed from a natural substance.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) The analgesic effect and (B) the anti-inflammatory effect of PW in male ICR mice. Each value represents the mean ± SE (n = 8). (A) The number of abdominal writhes was counted over 5–35 min after acetic acid intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. *p < 0.01 and **p < 0.001 as compared with the vehicle control + acetic acid group; (B) The weight of ear edema was measured 30 min after xylene application. **p < 0.001 when compared with the vehicle control + xylene group. Indo; Indomethacin (10 mg/kg).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4307301&req=5

ijms-16-01232-f006: (A) The analgesic effect and (B) the anti-inflammatory effect of PW in male ICR mice. Each value represents the mean ± SE (n = 8). (A) The number of abdominal writhes was counted over 5–35 min after acetic acid intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. *p < 0.01 and **p < 0.001 as compared with the vehicle control + acetic acid group; (B) The weight of ear edema was measured 30 min after xylene application. **p < 0.001 when compared with the vehicle control + xylene group. Indo; Indomethacin (10 mg/kg).

Mentions: The anti-nociceptive activity of PW was assessed through experimental models of pain stimuli using the writhing test. The writhing response defined in abdominal writhing behavior was induced by acetic acid intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, and indomethacin served as the analgesic positive control. An injection of acetic acid produced 77 ± 16.48 writhes in the vehicle control group. Treatment with indomethacin (10 mg/kg) resulted in a 69% inhibition in writhing when compared with the vehicle group. The oral administration of different doses of PW (117, 234 or 351 mg/kg) resulted in a significant reduction in the abdominal writhing responses after acetic acid injection (Figure 6A). A PW concentration of 351 mg/kg showed the maximal inhibition (62%), and the PW 50% effective dose (ED50) was 287.3 mg/kg.


Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of pyeongwisan on LPS-stimulated murine macrophages and mouse models of acetic acid-induced writhing response and xylene-induced ear edema.

Oh YC, Jeong YH, Cho WK, Ha JH, Gu MJ, Ma JY - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

(A) The analgesic effect and (B) the anti-inflammatory effect of PW in male ICR mice. Each value represents the mean ± SE (n = 8). (A) The number of abdominal writhes was counted over 5–35 min after acetic acid intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. *p < 0.01 and **p < 0.001 as compared with the vehicle control + acetic acid group; (B) The weight of ear edema was measured 30 min after xylene application. **p < 0.001 when compared with the vehicle control + xylene group. Indo; Indomethacin (10 mg/kg).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4307301&req=5

ijms-16-01232-f006: (A) The analgesic effect and (B) the anti-inflammatory effect of PW in male ICR mice. Each value represents the mean ± SE (n = 8). (A) The number of abdominal writhes was counted over 5–35 min after acetic acid intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. *p < 0.01 and **p < 0.001 as compared with the vehicle control + acetic acid group; (B) The weight of ear edema was measured 30 min after xylene application. **p < 0.001 when compared with the vehicle control + xylene group. Indo; Indomethacin (10 mg/kg).
Mentions: The anti-nociceptive activity of PW was assessed through experimental models of pain stimuli using the writhing test. The writhing response defined in abdominal writhing behavior was induced by acetic acid intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, and indomethacin served as the analgesic positive control. An injection of acetic acid produced 77 ± 16.48 writhes in the vehicle control group. Treatment with indomethacin (10 mg/kg) resulted in a 69% inhibition in writhing when compared with the vehicle group. The oral administration of different doses of PW (117, 234 or 351 mg/kg) resulted in a significant reduction in the abdominal writhing responses after acetic acid injection (Figure 6A). A PW concentration of 351 mg/kg showed the maximal inhibition (62%), and the PW 50% effective dose (ED50) was 287.3 mg/kg.

Bottom Line: However, its effects on inflammation-related diseases are unknown.We demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects and inhibitory mechanism in macrophages as well as inhibitory activity of PW in vivo for the first time.Our results suggest the potential value of PW as an inflammatory therapeutic agent developed from a natural substance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Korean Medicine (KM)-Based Herbal Drug Development Group, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, 461-24, Jeonmin-dong, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-811, Korea. ulivuli@kiom.re.kr.

ABSTRACT
Pyeongwisan (PW) is an herbal medication used in traditional East Asian medicine to treat anorexia, abdominal distension, borborygmus and diarrhea caused by gastric catarrh, atony and dilatation. However, its effects on inflammation-related diseases are unknown. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of PW on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in macrophages and on local inflammation in vivo. We investigated the biological effects of PW on the production of inflammatory mediators, pro-inflammatory cytokines and related products as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Additionally, we evaluated the analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response and the inhibitory activity on xylene-induced ear edema in mice. PW showed anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In addition, PW strongly suppressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a NO synthesis enzyme, induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and inhibited NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation. Also, PW suppressed TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β cytokine production in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophage cells. Furthermore, PW showed an analgesic effect on the writhing response and an inhibitory effect on mice ear edema. We demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects and inhibitory mechanism in macrophages as well as inhibitory activity of PW in vivo for the first time. Our results suggest the potential value of PW as an inflammatory therapeutic agent developed from a natural substance.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus