Limits...
Lipid metabolism, apoptosis and cancer therapy.

Huang C, Freter C - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Lipid metabolism is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, and generates a variety of bioactive lipid molecules.These bioactive lipid molecules known as signaling molecules, such as fatty acid, eicosanoids, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, lysophophatidic acid, ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and cholesterol, are involved in the activation or regulation of different signaling pathways.Bioactive lipid molecules promote apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by modulating mitochondrial membrane permeability and activating different enzymes including caspases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine and Cancer Center, Saint Louis University, 3655 Vista Avenue, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA. chunfahuang@slu.edu.

ABSTRACT
Lipid metabolism is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, and generates a variety of bioactive lipid molecules. These bioactive lipid molecules known as signaling molecules, such as fatty acid, eicosanoids, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, lysophophatidic acid, ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and cholesterol, are involved in the activation or regulation of different signaling pathways. Lipid metabolism participates in the regulation of many cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, survival, apoptosis, inflammation, motility, membrane homeostasis, chemotherapy response, and drug resistance. Bioactive lipid molecules promote apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by modulating mitochondrial membrane permeability and activating different enzymes including caspases. In this review, we discuss recent data in the fields of lipid metabolism, lipid-mediated apoptosis, and cancer therapy. In conclusion, understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of lipid metabolism and the function of different lipid molecules could provide the basis for cancer cell death rationale, discover novel and potential targets, and develop new anticancer drugs for cancer therapy.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Sphingolipid metabolism. Ceramide is a key intermediator in sphingolipid metabolism. The enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism are ceramidase (Case), ceramide kinase (CK), ceramide-1-phophosphate phosphatase (CPP), ceramide synthase (CS), dihydroceramide desaturase (DD), galactosylceramide synthase (GalCS), galactocer (GalC), glucosylceramide synthase (GCS), glucosylceramidase (Gcase), sphingomyelinase (Smase), and sphingomyelin synthase (SMS). Many of these products play an important role in cell signaling which regulates a variety of cellular functions. SMS converts phosphatidylcholine (PC) and ceramide to sphingomyelin and diacylglycerol which brings two major classes of lipids in cell metabolism and signaling.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4307283&req=5

ijms-16-00924-f002: Sphingolipid metabolism. Ceramide is a key intermediator in sphingolipid metabolism. The enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism are ceramidase (Case), ceramide kinase (CK), ceramide-1-phophosphate phosphatase (CPP), ceramide synthase (CS), dihydroceramide desaturase (DD), galactosylceramide synthase (GalCS), galactocer (GalC), glucosylceramide synthase (GCS), glucosylceramidase (Gcase), sphingomyelinase (Smase), and sphingomyelin synthase (SMS). Many of these products play an important role in cell signaling which regulates a variety of cellular functions. SMS converts phosphatidylcholine (PC) and ceramide to sphingomyelin and diacylglycerol which brings two major classes of lipids in cell metabolism and signaling.

Mentions: Sphingolipids, including the sphingomyelins and glycosphingolipids, are de novo synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) from nonsphingolipid precursors [14]. Sphingomyelins can be hydrolyzed by sphingomyelinases to produce ceramides and phosphocholine. The conversion of sphingosine to sphingosine-1-phosphate, sphingosine to ceramide, ceramide to ceramide-1-phosphate, and ceramide to glucosylceramide is catalyzed by different enzymes (Figure 2). Sphingolipids are also structural components of cell membrane, and the products of sphingolipid metabolism such as ceramide, ceramide-1-phosphate, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and glucosylceramide act as bioactive lipid molecules in apoptotic and drug-resistant signaling.


Lipid metabolism, apoptosis and cancer therapy.

Huang C, Freter C - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

Sphingolipid metabolism. Ceramide is a key intermediator in sphingolipid metabolism. The enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism are ceramidase (Case), ceramide kinase (CK), ceramide-1-phophosphate phosphatase (CPP), ceramide synthase (CS), dihydroceramide desaturase (DD), galactosylceramide synthase (GalCS), galactocer (GalC), glucosylceramide synthase (GCS), glucosylceramidase (Gcase), sphingomyelinase (Smase), and sphingomyelin synthase (SMS). Many of these products play an important role in cell signaling which regulates a variety of cellular functions. SMS converts phosphatidylcholine (PC) and ceramide to sphingomyelin and diacylglycerol which brings two major classes of lipids in cell metabolism and signaling.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4307283&req=5

ijms-16-00924-f002: Sphingolipid metabolism. Ceramide is a key intermediator in sphingolipid metabolism. The enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism are ceramidase (Case), ceramide kinase (CK), ceramide-1-phophosphate phosphatase (CPP), ceramide synthase (CS), dihydroceramide desaturase (DD), galactosylceramide synthase (GalCS), galactocer (GalC), glucosylceramide synthase (GCS), glucosylceramidase (Gcase), sphingomyelinase (Smase), and sphingomyelin synthase (SMS). Many of these products play an important role in cell signaling which regulates a variety of cellular functions. SMS converts phosphatidylcholine (PC) and ceramide to sphingomyelin and diacylglycerol which brings two major classes of lipids in cell metabolism and signaling.
Mentions: Sphingolipids, including the sphingomyelins and glycosphingolipids, are de novo synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) from nonsphingolipid precursors [14]. Sphingomyelins can be hydrolyzed by sphingomyelinases to produce ceramides and phosphocholine. The conversion of sphingosine to sphingosine-1-phosphate, sphingosine to ceramide, ceramide to ceramide-1-phosphate, and ceramide to glucosylceramide is catalyzed by different enzymes (Figure 2). Sphingolipids are also structural components of cell membrane, and the products of sphingolipid metabolism such as ceramide, ceramide-1-phosphate, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and glucosylceramide act as bioactive lipid molecules in apoptotic and drug-resistant signaling.

Bottom Line: Lipid metabolism is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, and generates a variety of bioactive lipid molecules.These bioactive lipid molecules known as signaling molecules, such as fatty acid, eicosanoids, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, lysophophatidic acid, ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and cholesterol, are involved in the activation or regulation of different signaling pathways.Bioactive lipid molecules promote apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by modulating mitochondrial membrane permeability and activating different enzymes including caspases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine and Cancer Center, Saint Louis University, 3655 Vista Avenue, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA. chunfahuang@slu.edu.

ABSTRACT
Lipid metabolism is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, and generates a variety of bioactive lipid molecules. These bioactive lipid molecules known as signaling molecules, such as fatty acid, eicosanoids, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, lysophophatidic acid, ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and cholesterol, are involved in the activation or regulation of different signaling pathways. Lipid metabolism participates in the regulation of many cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, survival, apoptosis, inflammation, motility, membrane homeostasis, chemotherapy response, and drug resistance. Bioactive lipid molecules promote apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by modulating mitochondrial membrane permeability and activating different enzymes including caspases. In this review, we discuss recent data in the fields of lipid metabolism, lipid-mediated apoptosis, and cancer therapy. In conclusion, understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of lipid metabolism and the function of different lipid molecules could provide the basis for cancer cell death rationale, discover novel and potential targets, and develop new anticancer drugs for cancer therapy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus