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Responses to oxidative and heavy metal stresses in cyanobacteria: recent advances.

Cassier-Chauvat C, Chauvat F - Int J Mol Sci (2014)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, in requiring high amounts of various metals for growth, cyanobacteria are also frequently affected by drastic changes in metal availabilities.They are often challenged by heavy metals, which are increasingly spread out in the environment through human activities, and constitute persistent pollutants because they cannot be degraded.Consequently, it is important to analyze the protection against oxidative and metal stresses in cyanobacteria because these ancient organisms have developed most of these processes, a large number of which have been conserved during evolution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UMR8221, CEA, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, Institut de Biologie et Technologie Saclay, Laboratoire de Biologie et Biotechnologie des Cyanobactéries, CEA-Saclay, Gif sur Yvette 91190, France. corinne.cassier-chauvat@cea.fr.

ABSTRACT
Cyanobacteria, the only known prokaryotes that perform oxygen-evolving photosynthesis, are receiving strong attention in basic and applied research. In using solar energy, water, CO2 and mineral salts to produce a large amount of biomass for the food chain, cyanobacteria constitute the first biological barrier against the entry of toxics into the food chain. In addition, cyanobacteria have the potential for the solar-driven carbon-neutral production of biofuels. However, cyanobacteria are often challenged by toxic reactive oxygen species generated under intense illumination, i.e., when their production of photosynthetic electrons exceeds what they need for the assimilation of inorganic nutrients. Furthermore, in requiring high amounts of various metals for growth, cyanobacteria are also frequently affected by drastic changes in metal availabilities. They are often challenged by heavy metals, which are increasingly spread out in the environment through human activities, and constitute persistent pollutants because they cannot be degraded. Consequently, it is important to analyze the protection against oxidative and metal stresses in cyanobacteria because these ancient organisms have developed most of these processes, a large number of which have been conserved during evolution. This review summarizes what is known regarding these mechanisms, emphasizing on their crosstalk.

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Schematic representation of the processes involved in metal homeostasis and detoxification (see text for abbreviations).
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ijms-16-00871-f002: Schematic representation of the processes involved in metal homeostasis and detoxification (see text for abbreviations).

Mentions: This review presents the current knowledge of the responses of cyanobacteria to heavy metals: transport, toxicity, perception and regulation of these processes; and their crosstalk with the defenses against oxidative stress (Figure 2).


Responses to oxidative and heavy metal stresses in cyanobacteria: recent advances.

Cassier-Chauvat C, Chauvat F - Int J Mol Sci (2014)

Schematic representation of the processes involved in metal homeostasis and detoxification (see text for abbreviations).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4307280&req=5

ijms-16-00871-f002: Schematic representation of the processes involved in metal homeostasis and detoxification (see text for abbreviations).
Mentions: This review presents the current knowledge of the responses of cyanobacteria to heavy metals: transport, toxicity, perception and regulation of these processes; and their crosstalk with the defenses against oxidative stress (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Furthermore, in requiring high amounts of various metals for growth, cyanobacteria are also frequently affected by drastic changes in metal availabilities.They are often challenged by heavy metals, which are increasingly spread out in the environment through human activities, and constitute persistent pollutants because they cannot be degraded.Consequently, it is important to analyze the protection against oxidative and metal stresses in cyanobacteria because these ancient organisms have developed most of these processes, a large number of which have been conserved during evolution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UMR8221, CEA, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, Institut de Biologie et Technologie Saclay, Laboratoire de Biologie et Biotechnologie des Cyanobactéries, CEA-Saclay, Gif sur Yvette 91190, France. corinne.cassier-chauvat@cea.fr.

ABSTRACT
Cyanobacteria, the only known prokaryotes that perform oxygen-evolving photosynthesis, are receiving strong attention in basic and applied research. In using solar energy, water, CO2 and mineral salts to produce a large amount of biomass for the food chain, cyanobacteria constitute the first biological barrier against the entry of toxics into the food chain. In addition, cyanobacteria have the potential for the solar-driven carbon-neutral production of biofuels. However, cyanobacteria are often challenged by toxic reactive oxygen species generated under intense illumination, i.e., when their production of photosynthetic electrons exceeds what they need for the assimilation of inorganic nutrients. Furthermore, in requiring high amounts of various metals for growth, cyanobacteria are also frequently affected by drastic changes in metal availabilities. They are often challenged by heavy metals, which are increasingly spread out in the environment through human activities, and constitute persistent pollutants because they cannot be degraded. Consequently, it is important to analyze the protection against oxidative and metal stresses in cyanobacteria because these ancient organisms have developed most of these processes, a large number of which have been conserved during evolution. This review summarizes what is known regarding these mechanisms, emphasizing on their crosstalk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus