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Stable hydrogen production from ethanol through steam reforming reaction over nickel-containing smectite-derived catalyst.

Yoshida H, Yamaoka R, Arai M - Int J Mol Sci (2014)

Bottom Line: The former is initially active, but significant catalyst deactivation occurs during the reaction due to carbon deposition.Side reactions of the decomposition of CO and CH4 are the main reason for the catalyst deactivation, and these reactions can relatively be suppressed by the use of the Ni-containing smectite.The Ni-containing smectite-derived catalyst contains, after H2 reduction, stable and active Ni nanocrystallites, and as a result, it shows a stable and high catalytic performance for the steam reforming of ethanol, producing H2.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: . yoshida@chem.kumamoto-u.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
Hydrogen production through steam reforming of ethanol was investigated with conventional supported nickel catalysts and a Ni-containing smectite-derived catalyst. The former is initially active, but significant catalyst deactivation occurs during the reaction due to carbon deposition. Side reactions of the decomposition of CO and CH4 are the main reason for the catalyst deactivation, and these reactions can relatively be suppressed by the use of the Ni-containing smectite. The Ni-containing smectite-derived catalyst contains, after H2 reduction, stable and active Ni nanocrystallites, and as a result, it shows a stable and high catalytic performance for the steam reforming of ethanol, producing H2.

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XRD patterns of SM(Ni35) before reduction (a) and after reduction (b); SM after calcination (c); Ni35/SM before reduction (d) and after reduction (e).
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ijms-16-00350-f001: XRD patterns of SM(Ni35) before reduction (a) and after reduction (b); SM after calcination (c); Ni35/SM before reduction (d) and after reduction (e).

Mentions: The formation of Ni nanoparticles in SM(Ni35) was examined by XRD (Figure 1). Two peaks assigned to the Ni metal were seen for SM(Ni35) after reduction, whereas no peak was observed before reduction (Figure 1a,b), indicating that Ni species were contained in a framework of SM(Ni35) just after synthesis, and these moved to the surface during the reduction process, forming nanoparticles. On the other hand, sharp peaks assigned to NiO were observed for Ni35/SM before reduction (Figure 1d) and changed almost to Ni metal after reduction (Figure 1e) with no change in the Ni crystallite size. Therefore, there are different mechanisms for the formation of Ni nanoparticle on SM(Ni35) and in Ni35/SM. For SM(Ni35), Ni species in a framework moved to the surface during reduction, but a strong interaction between Ni and the framework inhibited the significant sintering of Ni species, resulting in the formation of small Ni nanoparticles. For Ni35/SM, the crystallite size of Ni was determined before the reduction process, which was likely to depend on the calcination conditions.


Stable hydrogen production from ethanol through steam reforming reaction over nickel-containing smectite-derived catalyst.

Yoshida H, Yamaoka R, Arai M - Int J Mol Sci (2014)

XRD patterns of SM(Ni35) before reduction (a) and after reduction (b); SM after calcination (c); Ni35/SM before reduction (d) and after reduction (e).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4307250&req=5

ijms-16-00350-f001: XRD patterns of SM(Ni35) before reduction (a) and after reduction (b); SM after calcination (c); Ni35/SM before reduction (d) and after reduction (e).
Mentions: The formation of Ni nanoparticles in SM(Ni35) was examined by XRD (Figure 1). Two peaks assigned to the Ni metal were seen for SM(Ni35) after reduction, whereas no peak was observed before reduction (Figure 1a,b), indicating that Ni species were contained in a framework of SM(Ni35) just after synthesis, and these moved to the surface during the reduction process, forming nanoparticles. On the other hand, sharp peaks assigned to NiO were observed for Ni35/SM before reduction (Figure 1d) and changed almost to Ni metal after reduction (Figure 1e) with no change in the Ni crystallite size. Therefore, there are different mechanisms for the formation of Ni nanoparticle on SM(Ni35) and in Ni35/SM. For SM(Ni35), Ni species in a framework moved to the surface during reduction, but a strong interaction between Ni and the framework inhibited the significant sintering of Ni species, resulting in the formation of small Ni nanoparticles. For Ni35/SM, the crystallite size of Ni was determined before the reduction process, which was likely to depend on the calcination conditions.

Bottom Line: The former is initially active, but significant catalyst deactivation occurs during the reaction due to carbon deposition.Side reactions of the decomposition of CO and CH4 are the main reason for the catalyst deactivation, and these reactions can relatively be suppressed by the use of the Ni-containing smectite.The Ni-containing smectite-derived catalyst contains, after H2 reduction, stable and active Ni nanocrystallites, and as a result, it shows a stable and high catalytic performance for the steam reforming of ethanol, producing H2.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: . yoshida@chem.kumamoto-u.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
Hydrogen production through steam reforming of ethanol was investigated with conventional supported nickel catalysts and a Ni-containing smectite-derived catalyst. The former is initially active, but significant catalyst deactivation occurs during the reaction due to carbon deposition. Side reactions of the decomposition of CO and CH4 are the main reason for the catalyst deactivation, and these reactions can relatively be suppressed by the use of the Ni-containing smectite. The Ni-containing smectite-derived catalyst contains, after H2 reduction, stable and active Ni nanocrystallites, and as a result, it shows a stable and high catalytic performance for the steam reforming of ethanol, producing H2.

Show MeSH