Limits...
Polyorchidism: two case reports and a review of the literature.

Artul S, Habib G - J Med Case Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: Patient 2 was an 11-year-old Arabic boy with an inguinal mass resulted to be an additional testicle in the inguinal canal.Notably, inguinal or scrotal masses should not always be considered as lymph nodes or tumors.Indeed, a radiologist should always keep polyorchidism in mind when such masses are encountered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Radiology Department, EMMS Hospital Nazareth, Bar Ilan University, Faculty of Medicine, P, O, Box 11, 16100 Nazareth, Israel. suheil_artul@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Polyorchidism is a very rare anomaly that is defined by the presence of more than two testes. Although its presentation is primarily as triorchidism, cases of four testes have also been reported in the literature.

Case presentation: In this report, we describe color Doppler ultrasound findings in two cases. Patient 1 was a 37-year-old Arabic man with a scrotal mass and a double testicle in the right hemiscrotum visualized by ultrasound. Patient 2 was an 11-year-old Arabic boy with an inguinal mass resulted to be an additional testicle in the inguinal canal. The echogenic texture and vascular flow of supernumerary testicles in question were similar to those of the normal testicles; however, their size was smaller. After 3 years of follow-up, the tertiary testes in the two patients remained stable in both size and echogenicity.

Conclusion: Ultrasound plays a crucial role in the evaluation of masses. Notably, inguinal or scrotal masses should not always be considered as lymph nodes or tumors. Indeed, a radiologist should always keep polyorchidism in mind when such masses are encountered.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Grayscale ultrasound of patient 2. Image shows a normal testis on each side of the scrotum (white arrows).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4307231&req=5

Fig2: Grayscale ultrasound of patient 2. Image shows a normal testis on each side of the scrotum (white arrows).

Mentions: An 11-year-old Arabic boy was referred electively to our ultrasound unit for evaluation of a painless mass in the right inguinal area that was incidentally detected by his father while they were bathing. A grayscale ultrasound showed a normal testicle on each side of the scrotum (FigureĀ 2).


Polyorchidism: two case reports and a review of the literature.

Artul S, Habib G - J Med Case Rep (2014)

Grayscale ultrasound of patient 2. Image shows a normal testis on each side of the scrotum (white arrows).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4307231&req=5

Fig2: Grayscale ultrasound of patient 2. Image shows a normal testis on each side of the scrotum (white arrows).
Mentions: An 11-year-old Arabic boy was referred electively to our ultrasound unit for evaluation of a painless mass in the right inguinal area that was incidentally detected by his father while they were bathing. A grayscale ultrasound showed a normal testicle on each side of the scrotum (FigureĀ 2).

Bottom Line: Patient 2 was an 11-year-old Arabic boy with an inguinal mass resulted to be an additional testicle in the inguinal canal.Notably, inguinal or scrotal masses should not always be considered as lymph nodes or tumors.Indeed, a radiologist should always keep polyorchidism in mind when such masses are encountered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Radiology Department, EMMS Hospital Nazareth, Bar Ilan University, Faculty of Medicine, P, O, Box 11, 16100 Nazareth, Israel. suheil_artul@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Polyorchidism is a very rare anomaly that is defined by the presence of more than two testes. Although its presentation is primarily as triorchidism, cases of four testes have also been reported in the literature.

Case presentation: In this report, we describe color Doppler ultrasound findings in two cases. Patient 1 was a 37-year-old Arabic man with a scrotal mass and a double testicle in the right hemiscrotum visualized by ultrasound. Patient 2 was an 11-year-old Arabic boy with an inguinal mass resulted to be an additional testicle in the inguinal canal. The echogenic texture and vascular flow of supernumerary testicles in question were similar to those of the normal testicles; however, their size was smaller. After 3 years of follow-up, the tertiary testes in the two patients remained stable in both size and echogenicity.

Conclusion: Ultrasound plays a crucial role in the evaluation of masses. Notably, inguinal or scrotal masses should not always be considered as lymph nodes or tumors. Indeed, a radiologist should always keep polyorchidism in mind when such masses are encountered.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus