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Genomic instability in complicated and uncomplicated Egyptian schistosomiasis haematobium patients.

Abd El-Aal AA, Bayoumy IR, Basyoni MM, Abd El-Aal AA, Emran AM, Abd El-Tawab MS, Badawi MA, Zalat RM, Diab TM - Mol Cytogenet (2015)

Bottom Line: In the acute uncomplicated group, nuclear-DNA of urinary epithelial cells was found diploid with mean nuclear-DNA content of 2.2 ± 0.16SD.The difference between nuclear DNA-contents in acute and chronic cases was significant (P = 0.0001).DNA morphometry was valuable in detection of gross genetic changes in urothelial tissues.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Parasitology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.

ABSTRACT

Background: Exploration of genetic changes during active Schistosoma infection is important for anticipation and prevention of chronic sequelae. This study aimed to explore the genomic instability in chromosomal and cellular kinetics in Egyptians suffering from uncomplicated active schistosomiasis haematobium infection in addition to chronic schistosomiasis haematobium cases complicated by bilharzial-associated bladder cancer (BAC).

Results: This study was conducted on 46 schistosomiasis haemotobium cases, 22 were active (Viable S. haematobium eggs in urine samples as detected by microscopy) and 24 were chronic complicated with bladder cancer. Three cytogenetic techniques were applied; the first was quantitative nuclear-morphocytometry by means of which the Feulgen-stained nuclei were analyzed for parameters including shape, size, integrated optical-density and nuclear area. The second was Fluorescent In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) for specific p53gene-locus of chromosome 17 and the third technique was karyotyping. Concerning chronic complicated cases, the mean ± SD of DNA-content in urinary bladder tissue sections was 3.18 ± 0.65. Five samples (20.83%) of bladder tissue sections of chronic complicated cases showed diploid nuclei, 6 urinary bladder tissue samples (25%) were tetraploid, while 13 bladder samples (54.16%) were aneuploid. Epithelial cells of urine samples demonstrated aneuploidy (mean ± SD = 3.74 ± 0.36).Nuclear contents showed high proliferative DNA index in all urinary epithelial cells. In the acute uncomplicated group, nuclear-DNA of urinary epithelial cells was found diploid with mean nuclear-DNA content of 2.2 ± 0.16SD. Half of these diploid smears had a high proliferation index. The difference between nuclear DNA-contents in acute and chronic cases was significant (P = 0.0001). FISH technique for specific p53gene-locus and karyotyping were done on urinary bladder tissue specimens and peripheral blood monocytes of 8 chronic cases respectively. Three samples (37.5%) with invasive BAC had a deletion of the p53 gene. Karyotyping showed three cases out of the 8 chronic schistosomiasis haematobium patients with chromosomal fragmentations.

Conclusions: DNA morphometry was valuable in detection of gross genetic changes in urothelial tissues. It is an important prognostic factor in established schistosomiasis haematobium induced bladder malignancy. It has the great advantage of being applicable on urine cells making it suitable for the prediction of a tendency towards genetic instability in active schistosomiasis haematobium patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Combo-blot showing the histograms of Feulgen stained samples. (A) Relative distribution of DNA ploidy pattern among cells of the reference normal sample. (B) Urine smear from a chronic S. haematobium patient showing aneuploidy with high proliferation (green) blotted against the histogram of the reference sample (blue). (C) Epithelial cells of bilharzial induced bladder carcinoma revealing diploidy with a high proliferation pattern (green) blotted against the histogram of the reference sample (blue) (D) Feulgen stained tissue section from a chronic S. haematobium patient with bilharzial induced carcinoma showing aneuploidy with a high proliferation pattern (green) blotted against the histogram of the reference sample (blue).
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Fig2: Combo-blot showing the histograms of Feulgen stained samples. (A) Relative distribution of DNA ploidy pattern among cells of the reference normal sample. (B) Urine smear from a chronic S. haematobium patient showing aneuploidy with high proliferation (green) blotted against the histogram of the reference sample (blue). (C) Epithelial cells of bilharzial induced bladder carcinoma revealing diploidy with a high proliferation pattern (green) blotted against the histogram of the reference sample (blue) (D) Feulgen stained tissue section from a chronic S. haematobium patient with bilharzial induced carcinoma showing aneuploidy with a high proliferation pattern (green) blotted against the histogram of the reference sample (blue).

Mentions: While, in the acute uncomplicated group, nuclear DNA of urinary epithelial cells was found to be diploid with mean nuclear DNA content of 2.2 ± 0.16. Half of these diploid smears were found to have a high proliferation index. The difference between the mean DNA content of epithelial cell nuclei in acute and chronic cases was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.0001) (Table 5). The nuclear DNA contents of the cells were measured relative to the nuclear content of normal diploid nuclei from a reference control registered on the image analyzing soft-ware system using the Leica Qwin 500 Image Analyzer (LEICA Imaging Systems Ltd, Cambridge, England,). The mean DNA content of these reference nuclei (1.96) was taken as a reference value for the mean DNA content of the present study group (Figure 2, Combo-blot showing the histograms).Table 5


Genomic instability in complicated and uncomplicated Egyptian schistosomiasis haematobium patients.

Abd El-Aal AA, Bayoumy IR, Basyoni MM, Abd El-Aal AA, Emran AM, Abd El-Tawab MS, Badawi MA, Zalat RM, Diab TM - Mol Cytogenet (2015)

Combo-blot showing the histograms of Feulgen stained samples. (A) Relative distribution of DNA ploidy pattern among cells of the reference normal sample. (B) Urine smear from a chronic S. haematobium patient showing aneuploidy with high proliferation (green) blotted against the histogram of the reference sample (blue). (C) Epithelial cells of bilharzial induced bladder carcinoma revealing diploidy with a high proliferation pattern (green) blotted against the histogram of the reference sample (blue) (D) Feulgen stained tissue section from a chronic S. haematobium patient with bilharzial induced carcinoma showing aneuploidy with a high proliferation pattern (green) blotted against the histogram of the reference sample (blue).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4307227&req=5

Fig2: Combo-blot showing the histograms of Feulgen stained samples. (A) Relative distribution of DNA ploidy pattern among cells of the reference normal sample. (B) Urine smear from a chronic S. haematobium patient showing aneuploidy with high proliferation (green) blotted against the histogram of the reference sample (blue). (C) Epithelial cells of bilharzial induced bladder carcinoma revealing diploidy with a high proliferation pattern (green) blotted against the histogram of the reference sample (blue) (D) Feulgen stained tissue section from a chronic S. haematobium patient with bilharzial induced carcinoma showing aneuploidy with a high proliferation pattern (green) blotted against the histogram of the reference sample (blue).
Mentions: While, in the acute uncomplicated group, nuclear DNA of urinary epithelial cells was found to be diploid with mean nuclear DNA content of 2.2 ± 0.16. Half of these diploid smears were found to have a high proliferation index. The difference between the mean DNA content of epithelial cell nuclei in acute and chronic cases was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.0001) (Table 5). The nuclear DNA contents of the cells were measured relative to the nuclear content of normal diploid nuclei from a reference control registered on the image analyzing soft-ware system using the Leica Qwin 500 Image Analyzer (LEICA Imaging Systems Ltd, Cambridge, England,). The mean DNA content of these reference nuclei (1.96) was taken as a reference value for the mean DNA content of the present study group (Figure 2, Combo-blot showing the histograms).Table 5

Bottom Line: In the acute uncomplicated group, nuclear-DNA of urinary epithelial cells was found diploid with mean nuclear-DNA content of 2.2 ± 0.16SD.The difference between nuclear DNA-contents in acute and chronic cases was significant (P = 0.0001).DNA morphometry was valuable in detection of gross genetic changes in urothelial tissues.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Parasitology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.

ABSTRACT

Background: Exploration of genetic changes during active Schistosoma infection is important for anticipation and prevention of chronic sequelae. This study aimed to explore the genomic instability in chromosomal and cellular kinetics in Egyptians suffering from uncomplicated active schistosomiasis haematobium infection in addition to chronic schistosomiasis haematobium cases complicated by bilharzial-associated bladder cancer (BAC).

Results: This study was conducted on 46 schistosomiasis haemotobium cases, 22 were active (Viable S. haematobium eggs in urine samples as detected by microscopy) and 24 were chronic complicated with bladder cancer. Three cytogenetic techniques were applied; the first was quantitative nuclear-morphocytometry by means of which the Feulgen-stained nuclei were analyzed for parameters including shape, size, integrated optical-density and nuclear area. The second was Fluorescent In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) for specific p53gene-locus of chromosome 17 and the third technique was karyotyping. Concerning chronic complicated cases, the mean ± SD of DNA-content in urinary bladder tissue sections was 3.18 ± 0.65. Five samples (20.83%) of bladder tissue sections of chronic complicated cases showed diploid nuclei, 6 urinary bladder tissue samples (25%) were tetraploid, while 13 bladder samples (54.16%) were aneuploid. Epithelial cells of urine samples demonstrated aneuploidy (mean ± SD = 3.74 ± 0.36).Nuclear contents showed high proliferative DNA index in all urinary epithelial cells. In the acute uncomplicated group, nuclear-DNA of urinary epithelial cells was found diploid with mean nuclear-DNA content of 2.2 ± 0.16SD. Half of these diploid smears had a high proliferation index. The difference between nuclear DNA-contents in acute and chronic cases was significant (P = 0.0001). FISH technique for specific p53gene-locus and karyotyping were done on urinary bladder tissue specimens and peripheral blood monocytes of 8 chronic cases respectively. Three samples (37.5%) with invasive BAC had a deletion of the p53 gene. Karyotyping showed three cases out of the 8 chronic schistosomiasis haematobium patients with chromosomal fragmentations.

Conclusions: DNA morphometry was valuable in detection of gross genetic changes in urothelial tissues. It is an important prognostic factor in established schistosomiasis haematobium induced bladder malignancy. It has the great advantage of being applicable on urine cells making it suitable for the prediction of a tendency towards genetic instability in active schistosomiasis haematobium patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus