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Community perceptions, attitude, practices and treatment seeking behaviour for schistosomiasis in L. Victoria islands in Uganda.

Kabatereine N, Fleming F, Thuo W, Tinkitina B, Tukahebwa EM, Fenwick A - BMC Res Notes (2014)

Bottom Line: Our results showed that there are numerous challenges that must be overcome to achieve effective control of schistosomiasis in the islands.Furthermore, sanitation is appalling, no clean water and community knowledge about schistosomiasis is low even among biomedical staff.The government should provide adequate trained health workers and stock praziquantel in all island health facilities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Vector Control Division, Ministry of Health Uganda, Kampala, Uganda. tinkitina@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Over 200,000 people, most of them infected with Schistosoma mansoni inhabit 150 islands in Lake Victoria in Uganda. Although a programme to control the disease has been ongoing since 2003, its implementation in islands is inadequate due to high transport costs on water. In 2011 and 2012, the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases (GNNTD) through Schistosomiasis Control Initiative (SCI) provided financial support to ease treatment delivery on the islands and over the period, therapeutic coverage has been increasing. We conducted a study with an objective to assess community awareness of existence of the disease, its signs, symptoms, causes and transmission as well as attitude, practice and health seeking behavior.

Methods: This was a cross sectional descriptive study which used pre-tested interviewer administered questionnaire among purposively selected individuals in schools, health facilities and communities. Frequency distribution tables, graphs and cross tabulations were the main forms of data presentation.

Results: Our results showed that there are numerous challenges that must be overcome to achieve effective control of schistosomiasis in the islands. Many people especially young men are constantly on the move from island to island in search for richer fishing grounds and such groups are commonly known to miss treatment by mass chemotherapy. Unfortunately case management in health facilities is very poor; health facilities are few and understaffed mainly with unskilled personnel who are overburdened by other illnesses such as malaria and HIV and the supply of praziquantel in health facilities is inadequate. Furthermore, sanitation is appalling, no clean water and community knowledge about schistosomiasis is low even among biomedical staff.

Conclusion: Rather than elimination, our results indicate that the programme should continue to target morbidity control beyond the 2020s until preventive measures have been instituted. The government should provide adequate trained health workers and stock praziquantel in all island health facilities.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

To show that those Drug Distributors who were trained were each offered a T-shirt by RTI- ENVISION.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig4: To show that those Drug Distributors who were trained were each offered a T-shirt by RTI- ENVISION.

Mentions: However, they had a few concerns including long and costly distance to health facilities, lack of transport funds and demand for bribes by healthcare workers. Since most treatment for schistosomiasis is mainly offered through MDAs, the major threat to the programme is sustained voluntarism of drug distributors. Usually CMDs start dropping out of service as soon as they realize that they will not be paid for their work[27]. However, in this study, it was encouraging to note that CMDs were willing to continue distributing treatments even though they were not paid. During the 2012 MDA, NTD/RTI provided a T-shirt to each drug distributor (FigureĀ 4) which further encouraged their resolve to continue drug distribution.Figure 4


Community perceptions, attitude, practices and treatment seeking behaviour for schistosomiasis in L. Victoria islands in Uganda.

Kabatereine N, Fleming F, Thuo W, Tinkitina B, Tukahebwa EM, Fenwick A - BMC Res Notes (2014)

To show that those Drug Distributors who were trained were each offered a T-shirt by RTI- ENVISION.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4307169&req=5

Fig4: To show that those Drug Distributors who were trained were each offered a T-shirt by RTI- ENVISION.
Mentions: However, they had a few concerns including long and costly distance to health facilities, lack of transport funds and demand for bribes by healthcare workers. Since most treatment for schistosomiasis is mainly offered through MDAs, the major threat to the programme is sustained voluntarism of drug distributors. Usually CMDs start dropping out of service as soon as they realize that they will not be paid for their work[27]. However, in this study, it was encouraging to note that CMDs were willing to continue distributing treatments even though they were not paid. During the 2012 MDA, NTD/RTI provided a T-shirt to each drug distributor (FigureĀ 4) which further encouraged their resolve to continue drug distribution.Figure 4

Bottom Line: Our results showed that there are numerous challenges that must be overcome to achieve effective control of schistosomiasis in the islands.Furthermore, sanitation is appalling, no clean water and community knowledge about schistosomiasis is low even among biomedical staff.The government should provide adequate trained health workers and stock praziquantel in all island health facilities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Vector Control Division, Ministry of Health Uganda, Kampala, Uganda. tinkitina@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Over 200,000 people, most of them infected with Schistosoma mansoni inhabit 150 islands in Lake Victoria in Uganda. Although a programme to control the disease has been ongoing since 2003, its implementation in islands is inadequate due to high transport costs on water. In 2011 and 2012, the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases (GNNTD) through Schistosomiasis Control Initiative (SCI) provided financial support to ease treatment delivery on the islands and over the period, therapeutic coverage has been increasing. We conducted a study with an objective to assess community awareness of existence of the disease, its signs, symptoms, causes and transmission as well as attitude, practice and health seeking behavior.

Methods: This was a cross sectional descriptive study which used pre-tested interviewer administered questionnaire among purposively selected individuals in schools, health facilities and communities. Frequency distribution tables, graphs and cross tabulations were the main forms of data presentation.

Results: Our results showed that there are numerous challenges that must be overcome to achieve effective control of schistosomiasis in the islands. Many people especially young men are constantly on the move from island to island in search for richer fishing grounds and such groups are commonly known to miss treatment by mass chemotherapy. Unfortunately case management in health facilities is very poor; health facilities are few and understaffed mainly with unskilled personnel who are overburdened by other illnesses such as malaria and HIV and the supply of praziquantel in health facilities is inadequate. Furthermore, sanitation is appalling, no clean water and community knowledge about schistosomiasis is low even among biomedical staff.

Conclusion: Rather than elimination, our results indicate that the programme should continue to target morbidity control beyond the 2020s until preventive measures have been instituted. The government should provide adequate trained health workers and stock praziquantel in all island health facilities.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus